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Believe this to be a Winton. Can anyone confirm? Last thing I could find on it's where a bouts was In 1985, the Winton House Car was sold to the Imperial Palace Auto Collection in Las Vegas.  Hopefully it's being well kept somewhere still.

 

Scan-246.jpg

Edited by 30DodgePanel (see edit history)
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7 hours ago, 30DodgePanel said:

Bryn Mawr....

 

Scotland ? Would be interested to know what type of vehicle this is if anyone knows..

 

 

Image may contain: outdoor

 

Pennsylvania??

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4 minutes ago, nzcarnerd said:

 

An Overland closest to camera. A Siddeley-Deasy in the background.

 

7 hours ago, 30DodgePanel said:

289b42f48e989b6754547f79687962d6.jpg

Typifies this thread , great interesting period photo , thanks

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5 hours ago, Colin Spong said:

Thornycroft J Type Lorry as supplied to the British Armed Forces in World War 1.

Thornycroft with Trade Plate (2).jpg

thornycrofts, interesting, they had a huge works here in Southampton and actually worked for them as a contractor in the sixties ,but they were building warships then.

Edited by Pilgrim65 (see edit history)
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7 hours ago, nzcarnerd said:

 

Pennsylvania??

 

Sure is.... 

Good call ! 

 

https://mainlinehealth.org/locations/bryn-mawr-hospital/about/125-years

Just NW of Ardmore PA off hwy 30... So ironic as I was recently doing some research on a early DB dealership in that area too.

Edited by 30DodgePanel (see edit history)
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28 minutes ago, John_Mereness said:

1930 Marlborough Town Car by Brewster | Rolls royce, Rolls royce ...

Elegant proportions on this Rolls-Royce Brewster Marlborough town car, though a tad overboard on the cane-work...

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24 minutes ago, John_Mereness said:

Auburn, Cord, Duesenberg

 

116261919_1592437870924294_2244863607180166638_o.jpg?_nc_cat=103&_nc_sid=730e14&_nc_ohc=GKE69n3BEuYAX9XPSgQ&_nc_ht=scontent.fluk1-1.fna&oh=c49858fb622495d5b394accb94322a0d&oe=5F4CE0DC

 

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Is this Patty Allisons colorization work ? Incredible to see these old photos with hues. 

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Regarding the Bryn Mawr Hospital  cab over engine panel/ambulance(?) I am guessing but isn't this a 2 cylinder Autocar?

Reminded me of the Autocar hotel bus that Austin Clark had that was a 1920 and we used to use to go to lunch in after a long morning session at one

of Austin's Iron Range Days at his auto museum looking for parts 40 years ago. On the way back from lunch we would always pay our respects to actor Gary Cooper who is buried in

a cemetery just down the road from the auto museum . We would drive into the cemetery ( about 25 of us loaded into the bus) and Austin would pause for a moment and the rest of

the people in the cemetery couldn't figure out what was going on.

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In 1916, Adeline and Augusta Van Buren became the first women to travel across America on solo motorcycles. They made it despite being frequently arrested for wearing pants. 

 

307AED19-26AA-4FB2-B9E7-E11C4143377D.jpeg

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7 minutes ago, 30DodgePanel said:

 

It is... 

Not sure on year, I was thinking 1910 or 11 personally. 

 

Just from the pictures in The Standard Catalog it look as if 1911 was the first year for the fender 'eyebrows' and the 1912 looks much the same. Could be either.

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Posted (edited)

1930 Beverly Barnes - 8 cylinder at the London Motor Show. 11 foot 2 inch wheelbase.

A lot of the time when cars were photographed at the London Motor Show a white cloth was held up behind the car , this allowed easier publication of the photograph without a lot of editing by the magazine staff to eliminate distracting activity or other cars behind the prime subject. To the extreme right in this photo you can make out a guy wearing  a hat and vest , holding the cloth up with his right hand .

Beverly Barnes001.jpg

Edited by Walt G
typo (see edit history)
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1938 Packard 120 with ambulance coachwork. The location is Australia House in The Strand, London during wartime, probably around 1942.

The writing on the Packard states "Presented By Royal Automobile Club Victoria Australia, RACV  Patriotic Appeal". The Packard itself did

not come from Australia as it was registered in Yorkshire, England in 1938. British Empire countries raised funds for the war effort and paid

for ambulances and sometimes aircraft.  Due to the massive losses of vehicles in the evacuation from Dunkirk in 1940 the government bought

many hundreds of cars for conversion into ambulances, fire tenders and tea wagons. Many patriotic owners gave their cars to the war effort .

American cars were favoured as they were big, tough and could withstand continued abuse. This Packard has a very neat body compared

with most conversions which were simply cars with the rear body hacked off behind the front doors and a crude wooden box body fitted.

Those cars that survived the war often enjoyed. a third metamorphosis into "woodies" and light rucks.

Car 47.jpg

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3 minutes ago, Colin Spong said:

American cars were favoured as they were big, tough and could withstand continued abuse. This Packard has a very neat body compared

with most conversions which were simply cars with the rear body hacked off behind the front doors and a crude wooden box body fitted.

Those cars that survived the war often enjoyed. a third metamorphosis into "woodies" and light rucks.

Car 47.jpg

I assume too it had to do with parts supplies - they could fry other fish verses manufacture parts for British vehicles while purchasing parts from US.   And, not sure how Lend-Lease imp[acted as to vehicles, but there were probably some advantages for a short time in 1941.  

Sidenote:  I know the woman who had bought my RR PI Springfield new, bought the last unfinished RR PIII for 100K (Inskips finished the car) - that was I assume a "mercy buy" to funnel money into the country as apparently we were not able to privately donate to their effort. 

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Parts for American cars in England depending upon the popularity of the make could be reasonably obtainable. The Packard, Buick and to a certain extent Lincoln dealers in England were well equipped and there was a regular flow of cars across the Atlantic Ocean ( including parts) in the holds of luxury passenger ocean liners. Buicks were made in Canada as well so that allowed many with RHD to land on English soil with less taxation. Chrysler had a plant in Kew near London that made cars as well. The advertisements and listings of what American based cars were represented at London Motor shows give a great reading of what was going on and what was sold.

More obscure automotive commentary from long island ! 🥺. Thanks so much to my long time friend Colin Spong for his continued support of this thread with some amazing period photographs and detailed information.

And again I would be remiss if I didn't say thank you to all of you, who have supported this thread, by photo contributions, comments ( humorous, factual, not so factual , far out, and snide - I kinda like some of the snide ones) Special thanks always to AACA for putting up with a bunch of faded old photographs ( and some of you are thinking I am sure - yeah - from a faded old historian type  on long island) WG

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  • gwells changed the title to Period images to relieve some of the stress

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