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23 minutes ago, Tph479 said:

1932 Packard 900. I assume prototype. What design feature shows up on later custom body jobs?

 

A full-length, over-the-cowl hood!

'32 Packard 900 Light Eight sedan prototype.png

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On 7/26/2020 at 11:37 AM, twin6 said:

T cigars.jpg

stretch t.jpg

 

 

A couple of interesting model Ts. The second one is particularly interesting. It appears to be right hand driven, unless the photo has been flipped. Zooming in as close as detail and my computer skills would allow, the hub caps were not conclusive. However, then I noticed I could just barely make out the oil petcock used to check oil level. From this angle, that can only be seen from the right hand side of the car. Photo is correct. I had previously noticed the fork mounted electric headlamps, and louvered hood. Being an after-market body, it was probably originally sold as a chassis only, and could have been with or without fenders. Headlamps could be Ford factory, or after-market. Some chassis were sold with the earlier style firewall until 1917. Side oil lamps are clearly 1915, horn could be correct for Canadian cars, 1915 or earlier. Canadian cars did have the fork mounted electric headlamps in 1915, USA built Ts never had the fork mounted electric lamps from Ford's factory, although some did get them as after-market items. Spark and throttle levers and quadrant appear to be early '15 (an otherwise unusual combination).

The car appears to be a Canadian built, right hand driven, chassis with after-market body. 

Pay particular attention to the curved rear fender. The '15/'16 rear fender curved around the wheel, unlike the earlier models that (mostly) had rear fenders that went back flat on the back/top. Unlike the much more common '17 through '25 rear fenders which have a "crown" or "compound curve", the '15/'16 is a "flat curve" (no compound curve or crown). Most people believe that 1915 was the first year for Ford to use the flat curved rear fender. But that is not correct. Then when prompted, they will recall the 1911 torpedo roadster (and open roadster) which had curved fenders with longer sweeps on both front and rear. (Beating the 1915 by a bit over four years.)

However, the other model T that had a flat curved rear fender along with the standard flat front fender is the "open" or "mother-in-law" or "business" roadster for 1912 (beating the '15 for first by fully three years). That is what the upper photo is (probably the business roadster). While at a glance, the rear fender appears just like the 1915/'16 rear fender, the inner skirt is quite different. The commercial box is interesting, and they were manufactured by numerous companies in many styles. The car is an early 1912. Zooming in, I can clearly see the early style two-piece firewall which was being replaced by the one-piece style along about December of 1911 and January of '12.

 

Details, details.

Edited by wayne sheldon
Stupid mistake! Good to be able to correct it. (see edit history)
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1 minute ago, 58L-Y8 said:

Locomobile 90

Thanks, I knew I was looking at something I should know what it was.   Very late in the Locomobile game - a shame they could not hang on longer. 

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3 minutes ago, John_Mereness said:

Thanks, I knew I was looking at something I should know what it was.   Very late in the Locomobile game - a shame they could not hang on longer. 

It might also be a 1928 Locomobile 8-80 or 1929 Model 80, 86 or 88 on a 130" wheelbase, Lycoming 298.6 ci 4HL or HDL.  A four passenger Collegiate Coupe is listed in the Standard Catalog by Clark and Kimes.   At 1,112 cars for 1928 and 327 for 1929, one wonders how they kept the light on as long as they did. 

 

If Billy Durant could just have focused his interest on auto-making...

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Spotted a request by AACA Forum Member Nielpick and he would like to find period photos of his Aston Martin (and its twins of same year/style) - 1936 Aston Martin MK II 1.5 Litre Sports Saloon 

 

Registration No: BWM 243
Chassis No: F5-585-L

 

They key will be the registration number: BWM 243

 

Here are some 1950's or 1960's photos:

This 1936 Aston Martin Mark II Has Been In Storage For Half A ...

 

Rusting 1936 Aston Martin bought for just £300 is set to sell for ...

 

CLASSICS COMING TO AUCTION : 1936 Aston Martin MK II 1.5 Litre ...

 

Rusting 1936 Aston Martin bought for just £300 is set to sell for ...

 

'BWM 243' was sold new on January 31, 1936 by Watson & Co Ltd of Oldham Street, Liverpool to a Mr W F M Mather of Birkdale, Lancs. As today, it featured Green bodywork teamed with Green leather upholstery. As early as March of the same year it was sold to an R L Bowes of Fairmile, Cobham, courtesy of Winter Garden Garages, London. Almost exactly a year later it once again changed hands, this time to the benefit of a Captain G Fane of London EC3. 

There is then a break in the records until July 11 1953, when the car was acquired by a Mr Philip Kenyon of Liverpool for the princely sum of £350 - the bill of sale is included among the paperwork that accompanies this fascinating car. Mr Kenyon was apparently a brilliant self-taught electrical engineer who worked on the development of the first radar systems. Whilst that was his day job, during WWII he was also a member of the Radio Secret Service and most nights he would listen for and write down German morse code which was, the family understands now, sent on to Bletchley Park for decryption. Mr Kenyon would regularly be accused of being a "fifth columnist" himself by his neighbours due to the very large flag pole at the bottom of his garden which he employed as a mast. He neighbours wondered why the police took no action when they reported him for being a spy. 

He employed the Aston as family transport for himself, his wife and their two daughters, and it remained in such use until the late '60's when a handbrake cable broke and the owner decided it was no longer a practical mode of family transport The car was then retired to the garage alongside his house. The paperwork included with the sale also includes what possibly are the last insurance certificate and last Ministry of Transport Test Certificate dated 14 May 1967 and 7 May 1965 respectively. An "Instruction Book" dated 1 May 1953 and "Registration Book" from 1961 is also included. 

At his death in 1997, ownership of 'BWM 243' passed to his elder daughter, by then Mrs Ann Marks, who, recognising how the car had deteriorated in what had not been the most waterproof of buildings, had it moved to drier, warmer storage at her own premises, which is where it has remained until now. Mrs Marks passed away in October 2016, at which point title switched to her husband, Neil, in whose name the car is currently registered. 
 

 
 
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19 hours ago, 58L-Y8 said:

This Mt. Washington view warrants a better look.  It appears to be a right hand drive Pierce-Arrow.

 

Mt. Washington Carriage Road - June 28, 1926.jpg

 

Maybe the photo was printed back to front before it became a postcard?

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21 minutes ago, George Cole said:

1961 Buick with rotating seats.

1961-buick.jpg

And the 1967-'68 Imperial 'Mobile Director' actually made production!!

 

Craig

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Several pages back a photo was posted and the car make, model, and year was not provided.  Is this a 1910 or 1911 Locomobile, possibly a Model M?

5003483538_83ddb47495_b.jpg

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On 7/27/2020 at 7:56 AM, 58L-Y8 said:

This Mt. Washington view warrants a better look.  It appears to be a right hand drive Pierce-Arrow.

 

Mt. Washington Carriage Road - June 28, 1926.jpg

 

 

11 hours ago, nzcarnerd said:

 

Maybe the photo was printed back to front before it became a postcard?

 

 

The smooth style of the fenders makes the car several years old at the dated time of the photograph. Beyond that, the car appears to have cowl lamps. Unless those were added after the car was built, Pierce Arrow dropped that feature by 1919 if I recall correctly. Those electric cowl lamps were built into the wide flaring of the cowl from 1914 into 1918. In 1922, the cowl was made more streamlined in keeping with changing styles (most cars had adopted a more streamlined cowl several years earlier.  Since Pierce was one of the late ones switching to left hand driven in the USA, not making that change until 1921 (Stutz was about the same time, I don't recall the year for certain). Being about eight to ten years old in 1926, this car would have been right hand driven.

 

A wonderful photograph!

Many Pierce Arrows were used for stage services at or around expensive resort areas. They were so tough and well built, reliable and would run for such a long time under grueling conditions, that despite their high initial cost, such businesses found them economical. There were a few such services in the Mount Washington area (being on the West coast my entire life I am not very familiar with those services there, but have read of them a few times), and this car may be from one such stage service. There appears to be a "medallion" of some sort near the top of the radiator (bottom of the shell's top panel). That could be the stage service's medallion.

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Interesting and curious photograph of the 1929 series 137 Franklin dual cowl phaeton - has a rear bumper but no front bumper, and no rear license plate , can't see if there is a front license plate. the car pictured above it is a 1930 Franklin series 14 five passenger "Pirate" touring car.  I have ridden in the front seat of a Pirate like this and driven one as well, not constructed for anyone 6 feet tall with long legs.

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5 hours ago, Walt G said:

Interesting and curious photograph of the 1929 series 137 Franklin dual cowl phaeton - has a rear bumper but no front bumper, and no rear license plate , can't see if there is a front license plate. the car pictured above it is a 1930 Franklin series 14 five passenger "Pirate" touring car.  I have ridden in the front seat of a Pirate like this and driven one as well, not constructed for anyone 6 feet tall with long legs.

 

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Just looking at this for the first time today. Makes me very pleased to see that people like it and it is making them feel good.  With so many negative things happening everyday in the world we live in  I hope a lot of people get some relief from coming here to see something they can count on to put them in a good mood and have a happy place. I think it has accomplished what the title of the thread states.

It is not only a "feel good" but also is a strong imprint of vehicle history, that is what AACA is all about! We all owe AACA a huge debt of gratitude for picking up the tab that the posting of all these photographs is costing the club . YOUR CLUB DUES AT WORK  - preservation and sharing of the Period Images. Without all of you participating this would not be what it now has become. Thanks to all of you who contribute images, comments , and just being here to share in it all.  I obviously have a great interest in pre WWII era vehicles ( love the post war too) but the past several years the focus on the older vehicles has dropped off some and with what you see here I felt may get "newbies" interested , understand and appreciate  the pre WWII era plus make long time members/collectors sit back and think "wow - never seen that one before". We are a community of car people, historians and preservationists who love history . 😏

What sums it up best for me is a statement I have quoted here before , as stated by Oliver Norval Hardy to his friend Arthur Stanley Jefferson " Here's another fine mess you have gotten us into"  ( yes, those two are Laurel & Hardy)   Have a great day my friends!  Once again , thank you for being here.

Walt

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1 hour ago, Walt G said:

  I obviously have a great interest in pre WWII era vehicles ( love the post war too) but the past several years the focus on the older vehicles has dropped off some and with what you see here I felt may get "newbies" interested , understand and appreciate  the pre WWII era plus make long time members/collectors sit back and think "wow - never seen that one before". We are a community of car people, historians and preservationists who love history . 😏

I was away from the site for 3 years, from illness, and it is great to see a re-focus on prewars of the classic years.   I have never heard of the Delling before, it looks like it's built like a tank as far as strength!

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F&J - Glad you are back here to take in all the interesting stuff on the Forums!  Just so much stuff and so informative. It has made me appreciate some things more that I had marginal interest in before.

I know what it is like to be away from things due to health issues first hand.

Yes, my primary interest is in pre war cars/trucks but that is what was "old" when I first got into the car interest back in the early 1960s - the cars that are collected and appreciated today were new in the showroom when I started!  WOW a 1969 Dodge Charger is collectible and an antique - I recall my parents buying one new!  I like all cars ( mostly) but focus on what is more rapidly disappearing every year just due to age. This is especially true of the accurate  history. It is why I started this thread and why I spend most of my attention on and write articles about the pre war era.

The Delling image came from a real photo postcard that was issued by that company when the cars were new.

Perhaps I should change my name to "Pre war Walt" !!😂

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The middle of the three Packards posted above by twin6 is quite interesting. One of the interesting details on the car is that the dummy landau bar is mounted in what we (at least some of us?) consider to be a wrong way. As I have stated before on other threads, it doesn't really matter on the dummy irons. They were purely decoration, and since they didn't actually fold, which way the hinge-pin faced didn't really make much difference. However, very rarely do I see original era photographs showing the dummy bars mounted in an other than "correct" direction. And this is one of those rare photographs.

Landau irons mounted incorrectly in modern restorations is sort of a pet peeve of mine. All the thousands of original era photographs and original sales brochures showing them correctly, and a few people do it wrong, and a hundred other people copy the wrong way instead of looking at all the information showing the "right" way. The Packard in the top photo is the right way. Of course, they appear to be "live" irons, and therefore it would matter.

Edited by wayne sheldon
Additional thought. (see edit history)
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  • gwells changed the title to Period images to relieve some of the stress

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