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Period Images to Relieve some of the Stress

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

Posted (edited)
38 minutes ago, nzcarnerd said:

 

The registration plate is West Sussex from about 1938-39.  The car is a circa 1929 Bentley 4 1/2 litre. Probably the fastest fire engine in England during WW2.

 

From what I have found so far this car may not have survived.

Vintage Wolseley, Ferraris, 'Lady of the Lake' highlight museum news

This image is taken from a book I edited some years ago, 'Motor Mania' by Richard Sutton published by Collins and Brown (1996). The vertical crease is from the book's gutter. The original caption described the car as a 4.5 in use with the City of Chichester Auxiliary Fire Service during World War II.

(The image was supplied by Quadrant Picture Library which no longer exists.)

 

The license appears to have survived and is on a Bentley - these cars evolve though.

This car - updated
Chassis No. 54
Engine No. KM3097
Registration No. CPX 775

"My chassis 54 has been in the Fry family since 1933, and although I've been driving it for 20 years. I've only just bought it (Feb 2019)! 

Now that I've got all the paperwork, history and photographs, I note that some of the details previously submitted are incorrect. I'm also struggling to see where Clare Hay got some of her details re the first owner - W W Richards, March 1922. I'm certain that the first owner was J H Clay, who competed at Shelsley Walsh in the car in Sept 1922 and '23, and 24'.

 

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CPX 775, Bentley 4½ Litre (West Sussex) License plate of the Great ...

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)

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Maybe that's what inspired the quote attributed to Ettore Bugatti:  "Bentley makes the world's fastest lorries."

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3 hours ago, John_Mereness said:

https://mohistory.org/collections/item/N39770  AUTOMOBILE EXHIBITION, PACKARD MOTOR CAR CO. (1904 WORLD'S FAIR).

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Cool.......”Old Pacific” on the  left. You can see it today at The Henry Ford”.

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41 minutes ago, oldcarfudd said:

Maybe that's what inspired the quote attributed to Ettore Bugatti:  "Bentley makes the world's fastest lorries."


 

Having driven all of the Bentlys , and a dozen Bugatti’s, I’ll take the WO’s.

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1 hour ago, John_Mereness said:

Vintage Wolseley, Ferraris, 'Lady of the Lake' highlight museum news

This image is taken from a book I edited some years ago, 'Motor Mania' by Richard Sutton published by Collins and Brown (1996). The vertical crease is from the book's gutter. The original caption described the car as a 4.5 in use with the City of Chichester Auxiliary Fire Service during World War II.

(The image was supplied by Quadrant Picture Library which no longer exists.)

 

The license appears to have survived and is on a Bentley - these cars evolve though.

This car - updated
Chassis No. 54
Engine No. KM3097
Registration No. CPX 775

"My chassis 54 has been in the Fry family since 1933, and although I've been driving it for 20 years. I've only just bought it (Feb 2019)! 

Now that I've got all the paperwork, history and photographs, I note that some of the details previously submitted are incorrect. I'm also struggling to see where Clare Hay got some of her details re the first owner - W W Richards, March 1922. I'm certain that the first owner was J H Clay, who competed at Shelsley Walsh in the car in Sept 1922 and '23, and 24'.

 

image.jpeg.6dff59ab01ba0c7fdb3211d00fe677c5.jpeg

CPX 775, Bentley 4½ Litre (West Sussex) License plate of the Great ...

 Has to be later than 1922. Maybe that info was for another - 3 litre - car.

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AJ......it’s too new for me.

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Still runs and drive great.......and all original.

2F7E63B2-5746-41D1-ABCB-C97E9469C6CF.png

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President Harding's July 27, 1923, address at Husky Stadium in Seattle WA, in which he discussed Alaskan oil among other topics, was the last speech of his presidency. He died of pneumonia a few days later in San Francisco.

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1 hour ago, edinmass said:

AJ......it’s too new for me.

 

It was a trick question anyways.   It's a souped up Lincoln,  but the taillights had me thinking Pierce Arrow.

 

Lincoln roadster custom built for Charles Luciano. The model was named Lucey as her owner's nickname was lucky.

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4 hours ago, John_Mereness said:

AUBURN 851 AMBULANCE  Photo of Keith Cox seated the driver's seat of a 1930s era car in front of a business called Dexmann. There is a placard in the front window of the car that also reads Dexmann. The auto is quite long and is a hearse. Dexmann Funeral Home; found from other photos from the Cox Family Collection, that show the same subject from different angles, including the inside back of the hearse.

 Print, Photographic : v019-01802

 

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I believe Auburn made their own hearse bodies in 1936.

 

Craig

36_Auburn.jpg

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In 1929, the Seattle Automobile Dealers Association joined with groups in Los Angeles, Chicago, and New York to host a travelling auto show. The group brought more than a million dollars worth of cars to the Hec Edmondson Pavilion at the University of Washington.

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6 hours ago, John_Mereness said:

 

A wonderfully detailed and sharp photo of a 1934 Plymouth DeLuxe (engineering code PE) with a number of options (dual trumpet horns, bumper guards, passenger side wiper, etc.). License plate brackets front and rear but no license tags so I am assuming this is a brand new car at the time of the photo.

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Posted (edited)

A Fiat 501 2-door sedan with assymetrically placed doors photograped 1924 in Roslagen, Sweden. Very unusual with disk-wheels on a vintage Fiat, they were reserved for their taxi-cabs. I think the car belonged to Gustaf L. M. Ericsson, son of the Swedish telephone Pioneer.

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Edited by Casper Friederich (see edit history)
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Posted (edited)
12 hours ago, 8E45E said:

I believe Auburn made their own hearse bodies in 1936.

 

Craig

36_Auburn.jpg

Central Manufacturing made the 1934-1936 bodies - it was a business under the  E.L. Cord umbrella (and Limousine Body Company was also under the umbrella).  I have heard Auburn referred to as component built cars, but they owned a fair amount of the component part company's so have never think of it that way.   An Ambulance/hearse is basically a stretched sedan.  

 

As a sidenote:  All of the bodies had steel body sill structure (sort of an "i-beam" affair) and all steel cowl construction too.  The Phaeton (their "state of the art car") was all steel body construction car (with some wood for upholstery tacking), while the closed cars and the coupes/convertible coupes had a certain amount of wood construction.   Unfortunately, they used "Poplar" for their wood and its longevity proved limited with even slight abuse. 

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)

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Philipson's ad for Cord on the back cover of Bonniers Månadsmagasin in 1930. Interesting as the front-wheel drive American is absent from the list of car models in the Royal Swedish Automobileclub's almanach/handbook for that year, eventhough Rolls-Royce and Isotta-Fraschini are listed

IMG_20200609_210134.jpg

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14 hours ago, 8E45E said:

I believe Auburn made their own hearse bodies in 1936.

 

Craig

36_Auburn.jpg

I have worked on this car. Underneath the upholstery, inside the driver's door is a baggie containing some of the cremains of an unknown person who never wanted to be separated from this car. Out of respect for that person we elected to leave them right there. 

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25 minutes ago, ericmac said:

I have worked on this car. Underneath the upholstery, inside the driver's door is a baggie containing some of the cremains of an unknown person who never wanted to be separated from this car. Out of respect for that person we elected to leave them right there. 

I recall being over at a friends house while they were moving in and someone pulled an urn out of the fireplace and proclaimed it a cool brass jar, then they opened it up and proclaimed it an ashtray, and then saw there was a little piece of paper and reached in and pulled that out -  "oh, ....  - and none of us could get a word in edge wise fast enough to stop them. 

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