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Period images to relieve some of the stress


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1 hour ago, 58L-Y8 said:

Condensing the image  and reducing the contrast seems to help show the details.  I'd opine it was a European coach-built Packard by the descending belt-line and top with landau irons with a 1940-'41 radiator grille grafted onto the wider shell, maybe a 1935 Eight. 

PACKARD Bird estate auction 1962.jpg


Could it be the Sergio Franchi Packard? About thr right time and place.

 

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, Casper Friederich said:

1923-24 6/24 PS, perhaps a former open tourer rebodied. The latter 6/25 had plainer headlights. 

The clothes the couple is wearing has a more 30s feeling, too.

 

Agreed.   And I like it.

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A 1907 ad for the Adams automobile used a term "Pedals To Push".  There is an article about the Adams vehicle in a publication titled Motor Traction, May 9, 1908, page 478, titled "The Adams Pedals-to-Push Cab."  The article describes the system as:  ...."the transmission gear is epicyclic, and the changes are controlled by pedals actuating the necessary brakes and clutches to bring the required gears into action. ... operated as it is by brakes and clutches ... provides three speeds forward and reverse ... power is taken by propeller shaft to the rear live axle."  The description of the Adams transmission suggests it is somewhat similar to but different than the Ford Model-T transmission, that uses foot pedals to operate bands in a planetary transmission.

07 Adams Clymer Scrapbook Foreign Car Vol. 1 p100.JPG

Adams taxicab with pedals to push control Motor Traction May 9 1908 p478.JPG

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12 hours ago, LCK81403 said:

A 1907 ad for the Adams automobile used a term "Pedals To Push".  There is an article about the Adams vehicle in a publication titled Motor Traction, May 9, 1908, page 478, titled "The Adams Pedals-to-Push Cab."  The article describes the system as:  ...."the transmission gear is epicyclic, and the changes are controlled by pedals actuating the necessary brakes and clutches to bring the required gears into action. ... operated as it is by brakes and clutches ... provides three speeds forward and reverse ... power is taken by propeller shaft to the rear live axle."  The description of the Adams transmission suggests it is somewhat similar to but different than the Ford Model-T transmission, that uses foot pedals to operate bands in a planetary transmission.

07 Adams Clymer Scrapbook Foreign Car Vol. 1 p100.JPG

Adams taxicab with pedals to push control Motor Traction May 9 1908 p478.JPG

Based on the American Hewitt, according to Bill Boddy who wrote twice about the "pedals to push" Adams in his Motorsport Magazine, in September 1958 and August 1990 issues.

BTW Hewitt was swallowed up by Mack Trucks, mr. R. Hewitt remaining as a consulting engineer for the new company.

https://www.motorsportmagazine.com/archive/article/september-1958/51/fragments-forgotten-makes

https://www.motorsportmagazine.com/archive/article/august-1990/72/forgotten-makes-no93-the-pedals-to-push-adams

Edited by Casper Friederich (see edit history)
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A 1939 Mercedes-Benz at 248 MPH had to be scary -- on 1930's rubber technology -- on bias ply tires.  Whew!  And there does not appear to be much airflow through a radiator.

39 Mercedes-Benz racer Clymer Scrapbook Foreign Car Vol. 1 p222.JPG

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11 hours ago, Casper Friederich said:

Two Austria-Hungarian K.A.N.s before WWI. The car at right appears to be smaller, so it certainly is of the single cylinder model.

kan (2).png

Just found out that this body style was  labelled Prinz Heinrich  by the factory, but I strongly doubt it ever participated in that competition.

Königgrätzer (2).jpg

Edited by Casper Friederich (see edit history)
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  • gwells changed the title to Period images to relieve some of the stress

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