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Period images to relieve some of the stress


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John's photos of all those obscure foreign cars made me think of this movie clip from the 3 Stooges in 'Punch Drunks'.  Damsel in distress in her 34 Plymouth PE convertible coupe, stuck in a ditch:

Damsel:  "I'm in a terrible dilemma!"

Mo:  "Yeah, I don't go for those foreign cars either."

3stoogespunchdrunks4hj2.jpg

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4 hours ago, John_Mereness said:

Tim Martin | The Old Motor | Page 6

The car is a model 48 Locomobile, sold new by Hare Motor Company of NY, NY . Photo was taken in Westchester County.

Same car is pictured along with more then a dozen others in a showroom album kept at the dealership which was located just a few blocks west of Central Park South in Manhattan. I have that showroom album in my archives .  I have a story on Emlen S. Hare and his car activities ( he started with Packard of NY) and career in the works.

Walt

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4 hours ago, John_Mereness said:

106577081_2524571354472395_4524331014515341347_o.jpg?_nc_cat=108&_nc_sid=825194&_nc_ohc=-zI3ejGFHOwAX-lG3Du&_nc_ht=scontent.fluk1-1.fna&oh=038011fe2bc5b1bb3636aae5d37ce063&oe=5F212236

 

The three 'P's plus?  From left a mystery car from an earlier date than the others (which I think all date from circa 1912-14), then a Peerless, a big Renault, a Pierce-Arrow(a 48?), a Packard 3-48(?), and ? - a Minerva maybe? Combined value when new of a couple of streets full of small houses.

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1 hour ago, Robert G. Smits said:

 

Thanks Wayne, what about the other two?

The detail and clarity in the photo is lacking enough that positive identification may not be possible. However, I am fairly sure the car behind the Fuller is an about 1904 Cadillac, model B if I recall correctly. I am a little unsure because while the hood and what I can see of the front axle peeking through the wheel look correct for the Cadillac, the wheelbase appears a bit longer than a few cars I have seen.

The car in front will be the toughest one. The basic style, shape of radiator and fenders was all quite common in the 1908 to 1910 years. I would guess it is most likely a Buick, likely a four cylinder. 

That model of Fuller is unusual enough that they are easily spotted. I am not certain about it though because the 1910 "Jackson" Fuller model had fourteen spokes in the wheels whereas this car has only twelve. The Fuller had an interesting and confusing history. There were two unrelated companies that built cars under the Fuller name. The Jackson Michigan cars were an off-shoot of the Jackson automobile (a complicated yet interesting relationship!). The other company was in Nebraska! Both companies built semi-high-wheel models similar to this car. History books, automotive guides, and other resources are often wrong. The Kimes and Clark catalog of cars (18** to 1942) even has the photographs identified incorrectly. I "think" this car may actually be the Nebraska Fuller, however it could be one of the early "Jackson" Fullers, although mostly looking correct, the 1910 "Jackson" Fuller had a few details  (like the spoke count and steering wheel) different. Fenders however look correct.

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1 hour ago, nzcarnerd said:

 

The three 'P's plus?  From left a mystery car from an earlier date than the others (which I think all date from circa 1912-14), then a Peerless, a big Renault, a Pierce-Arrow(a 48?), a Packard 3-48(?), and ? - a Minerva maybe? Combined value when new of a couple of streets full of small houses.

 

I would question the "Renault" identification? Franklin also built a large model with that type hood (bonnet). The cowl lamps (barely visible) and apparent lack of radiator behind the bonnet make me suspect that it may be the big Franklin which was air-cooled and did not have a radiator.

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28 minutes ago, wayne sheldon said:

The detail and clarity in the photo is lacking enough that positive identification may not be possible. However, I am fairly sure the car behind the Fuller is an about 1904 Cadillac, model B if I recall correctly. I am a little unsure because while the hood and what I can see of the front axle peeking through the wheel look correct for the Cadillac, the wheelbase appears a bit longer than a few cars I have seen.

The car in front will be the toughest one. The basic style, shape of radiator and fenders was all quite common in the 1908 to 1910 years. I would guess it is most likely a Buick, likely a four cylinder. 

That model of Fuller is unusual enough that they are easily spotted. I am not certain about it though because the 1910 "Jackson" Fuller model had fourteen spokes in the wheels whereas this car has only twelve. The Fuller had an interesting and confusing history. There were two unrelated companies that built cars under the Fuller name. The Jackson Michigan cars were an off-shoot of the Jackson automobile (a complicated yet interesting relationship!). The other company was in Nebraska! Both companies built semi-high-wheel models similar to this car. History books, automotive guides, and other resources are often wrong. The Kimes and Clark catalog of cars (18** to 1942) even has the photographs identified incorrectly. I "think" this car may actually be the Nebraska Fuller, however it could be one of the early "Jackson" Fullers, although mostly looking correct, the 1910 "Jackson" Fuller had a few details  (like the spoke count and steering wheel) different. Fenders however look correct.

Does this help?

'10's group of three.jpg

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Posted (edited)
44 minutes ago, wayne sheldon said:

 

I would question the "Renault" identification? Franklin also built a large model with that type hood (bonnet). The cowl lamps (barely visible) and apparent lack of radiator behind the bonnet make me suspect that it may be the big Franklin which was air-cooled and did not have a radiator.

I would lean toward Franklin too (the reason why is a lot of Renault's have a radiator between the hood and the cowl) - plus, strikes me as full elliptical springs and strikes me as American lighting. 

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)
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Posted (edited)
39 minutes ago, 58L-Y8 said:

Does this help?

'10's group of three.jpg

 

 

It certainly makes the picture look better! However in many cases, detail once lost, whether due to the limitations of the original camera and/or film, or the ravages of time upon the surviving image, is not easily recoverable. Sometimes, adjusting contrast and brightness can bring out some things. Often not much can be gained short of either artistic restoration or a major reconstruction computer program. Both of which largely use guesswork in reconstructing lost details.

 

But Thank You regardless! It does look better.

Edited by wayne sheldon (see edit history)
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2 hours ago, wayne sheldon said:

 

I would question the "Renault" identification? Franklin also built a large model with that type hood (bonnet). The cowl lamps (barely visible) and apparent lack of radiator behind the bonnet make me suspect that it may be the big Franklin which was air-cooled and did not have a radiator.

 

You may be right. I hadn't looked for a radiator, I was just thinking expensive cars. 

 

My copy of Floyd Clymer's 1914 cars shows a similar looking car, although it has electric cowl lamps. The wheelbase was 120" and the cost $2300 for the touring car.  Maybe the car here is 1913

 

It doesn't help that driver is obscuring the front of the hood.

 

Plenty to choose from here - https://www.franklincar.org/tech/YOMImages/#1913

 

 

 

 

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Posted (edited)

The Lagonda Rapier with a 1,1 Litre twin-cam four. No factory bodies were offered, instead coachbuilt albeith in small series. After Lagonda Company reorganized in 1935 the rights to this smaller model was sold to Rapier Motors Ltd who continued production up to WWII

Lagonda Rapier (2).jpg

Lagonda Rapier (4).jpg

Edited by Casper Friederich (see edit history)
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Posted (edited)

Joseph Larson from Finland started Suomi Auto school in New York City in the 1910s. After his native country gained independence he settled in Helsinki and started a driving school here. I believe he took with him a shovel nosed Franklin when returning to his old homeland. At least there was a similar open Franklin in traffic in the Finnish Capital at least up to the Summer of 1925.

Franklin i Finland (2).jpg

Edited by Casper Friederich (see edit history)
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On 6/28/2020 at 7:36 PM, TG57Roadmaster said:

1936 Delahaye 135 Cabriolet by Henri Chapron, from the French magazine Miroir du Monde.

935580791_36103DelahayeMiroirduMondeX.thumb.jpg.40dd48ea2f4f23a1310122b8e0c66d09.jpg

 

TG

 

We should count up the number of cars with triple wipers.   The long chassis 320 Cab A Mercedes is another that comes to mind.   The common denominator with this car is the low raked windshield.

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On 7/1/2020 at 11:14 AM, John_Mereness said:

FWD Miller

Strange/Rare car profiles-identifies threat | Page 10 | Forum ...

 

HARRY A. MILLER, INC. | EDL Services LLC.

 

Strange/Rare car profiles-identifies threat | Page 10 | Forum ...

 

 

I've never seen the top picture before!!!   Where did you find that?    I think the bottom one is the one in circulation?  Or maybe I haven't see that one before either.

 

 

 

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  • gwells changed the title to Period images to relieve some of the stress

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