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1914-1915 Chevy H-2 Royal Mail Roadster.


Dandy Dave

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Yep. I would not kick one out of the garage. Got that flyer last summer helping a buddy getting ready to have a tractor auction. It was in a pile of books and paperwork. we were digging through. Dandy Dave!

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A friend who lives about 10 miles from here at Childers, Bob Schuhkraft, has personally restored one of these from very sad basics.  If you send me a private message I can help you to communicate to get photos.   I used to help him with machine jobs before he bought his own lathe.  A feature of the oiling system of these engines which I have never known elsewhere is the supply to the crankshaft main bearings by plaited wicks of felt strips.  Bob had enough remnants to make new ones as original.   One of his brothers, John, made scores of nest boxes and mounted them on trees in the steep gullies on the property.    He would take visitors to one tree where you could climb a small step ladder, and see a family of little faces of Sugar Gliders.  These are tiny marsupial gliding possums who feed on nocturnal insects.  You had a close view of nature without causing any distress.

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2 hours ago, Mark Wetherbee said:

I like the looks and also wonder how much it shares with Little for parts?

Jim Everett restore a Little around 1970, and later sold it to his employer, ( who had a business which supplied equipment to butchers shops, and whose name temporarily escapes me).  That Little was virtually a clone of the Hupp 20.

Bob S. who I mentioned above has the essentials of several other early Chevs; and he showed me how the first originals were actually a very well made, high quality car, but there was inferior detail in certain later models.  Bob drives his car to events.

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5 hours ago, Ivan Saxton said:

A friend who lives about 10 miles from here at Childers, Bob Schuhkraft, has personally restored one of these from very sad basics.  If you send me a private message I can help you to communicate to get photos.   I used to help him with machine jobs before he bought his own lathe.  A feature of the oiling system of these engines which I have never known elsewhere is the supply to the crankshaft main bearings by plaited wicks of felt strips.  Bob had enough remnants to make new ones as original.   One of his brothers, John, made scores of nest boxes and mounted them on trees in the steep gullies on the property.    He would take visitors to one tree where you could climb a small step ladder, and see a family of little faces of Sugar Gliders.  These are tiny marsupial gliding possums who feed on nocturnal insects.  You had a close view of nature without causing any distress.

Ivan. International Harvester Tractors in the 20's and 30's used felt wicks in the top end to oil the valve train. If your friend would like to share some photos here of his car that would be nice to see and add to the thread. Thanks, Dandy Dave!   

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