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Frame/chassis identification.


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We have a frame/chassis that we are trying to identify. It seems to be mid 20's. It has 14' external contracting Lockheed hydraulic brakes, and seems to be about 124" wheelbase. It has been suggested elsewhere on this forum that it may be Studebaker. Did the factory stamp serial numbers on the frame anywhere that may help ID this chassis? I'm in So. Cal., and trying to help my parents clean up their back yard. Our interests are in Hudsons, and this piece is completely foreign to us. I would love to see it go to a new home, vs getting scrapped. I no longer have the photos on my phone, but they are posted in the "Chrysler Products- general" section of this forum. Or, you can click on my name and it will show you all of my posts. Thanks for looking.

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On 3/6/2020 at 2:07 PM, Aussi John 1 said:

If it's in the 20s, it is not a Studebaker, as Studebaker didn't get hydraulic brakes until 1935. It a most likely a Chrysler, as there were few other cars in the 20s with hydraulic brakes. 

 

The first Studebaker four-wheel- brakes - for 1925-26 - were operated hydraulically. The four wheel brakes were a $75 option and required the use of disc wheels. The wood wheels on some cars identify them as being two-wheel-braked.

 

From 1927 they went back to Bendix mechanical brakes.

 

I reckon this is a 1925-26 Studebaker Big Six frame.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Thank you for the input, gentlemen. The general concensus with the local Studebaker crowd is, it is not Studebaker. I am finding that many Stude guys didn't know hydraulic brakes were offered in '25 and '26. If we can't find anyone who wants it soon, I will end up taking to the scrap yard. I hate to do it.

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  • 1 month later...
On 3/18/2020 at 11:22 AM, 54Coupe said:

Thank you for the input, gentlemen. The general concensus with the local Studebaker crowd is, it is not Studebaker. I am finding that many Stude guys didn't know hydraulic brakes were offered in '25 and '26. If we can't find anyone who wants it soon, I will end up taking to the scrap yard. I hate to do it.

The other feature of the hydraulic brakes on this model and year Studebaker was the fact that the hydraulics operated off the transmission (i believe their was a small hydraulic pump of sorts on the side of the tranny near the gear shift) and the reason Studebaker did not continue with their hydraulic brake system and that technology back then and into subsequent years and didnt reexplore the use of hydraulic brakes until 1935 was that if the car stopped running for what ever reason while you were moving, the car lost most of its breaking ability, which made for some dicey situations. Which is why it was a brief flash in the pan. Had they not attached the use of having the hydraulics relying on a pump operating off the transmission and instead created an independent master cylinder they would have been advanced above all the rest of the competition but I suppose they figured they had created a safety issue which gave them cold feet and made them decide to stay clear of pursuing the use of anymore hydraulics.

Edited by 29StudiePrez (see edit history)
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I looked at the photos and it sure  looks like Studebaker.  The only guy I can think of messing with 25 and 26 was Bob Burk.  I remember him telling me about the goofy brakes.  He is in Elefredia, Az now.  Past ASC president.

 

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