Sam The Cat

Would you recommend buying a classic to anyone?

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Posted (edited)
41 minutes ago, mercer09 said:

what's the matter with girls?

 

 

well, you thought you were broke from the cars?

 

try again...........

Like my Signature say's...  Most of my money I spent on Tools, Mechanical things, and Girls. The rest I wasted!  

Edited by Dandy Dave (see edit history)
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On ‎3‎/‎3‎/‎2020 at 7:59 AM, Rusty_OToole said:

what's the matter with girls?

 

Cant turn them off and leave them in the garage overnight.

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1 minute ago, JACK M said:

 

Cant turn them off and leave them in the garage overnight.

 

Really?

 

Uh oh. Be right back.

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On 3/2/2020 at 7:12 PM, TerryB said:

A daily driver as in your main form of transportation would not work out if you have zero mechanical skills.  When something breaks you will be forced to find parts and a mechanic that is willing to work on it.  Most mechanic shops will not want your business especially if the vehicle is a blend, like a Plymouth with a Chevy engine.  They need fast turnaround for customers to stay in business.

 

Find a vehicle you like that is in good overall condition and something that getting parts for will not be a huge adventure if your looking to be part of the old car hobby.  

Thanks, that makes sense to me. As I talk to more people about it I learn about the other aspects of the hobby I haven't thought of. 

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On 3/2/2020 at 8:15 PM, TTR said:

With all due respect and nothing personal, but based on what I'm reading here, NO, I wouldn't recommend buying an old "classic"(?) to you or anyone with similar approach or concerns. 

Too many ifs, buts, fears and financial worries etc on your mind to be an enthusiastic and serious custodian of one. 
 

IF or when, on the other hand, you're willing to throw all caution to the wind, fully commit your heart, mind and wallet to whatever may come with an old car,  then MAYBE ?

Seems like good advice to me.

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On 3/2/2020 at 8:36 PM, Matt Harwood said:

As a newcomer it's a mistake to buy a vehicle that's cobbled up. Buy a stock one so that it can be serviced. If you know nothing about old cars and trucks, buying one that is someone's idea of what it should be is a mistake. Should anything break, you'll spend far more time and effort trying to figure out how to fix it. All kinds of stuff will be home-built and it will be the source of endless frustration. I guarantee the wiring will e a nightmare, whatever hardware they used to adapt the Chevy to the Plymouth will be full of home-made brackets and hardware store fasteners and amateur suspension setup. Are the brakes stock or someone's "kit" that isn't really right. Modified vehicles, especially inexpensive ones, are sure to be chock full of headaches.

 

Old cars can be used as daily drivers and there are those here who do it, but I wouldn't recommend it for someone who isn't mechanically inclined and intimately familiar with the vehicle you're driving. Unless your commute is short, away from traffic, and not on the highway, an old car is going to be stressful, not fun. It won't be fast, it won't stop well, it won't handle well, and it doesn't have creature comforts like A/C. I can also guarantee it WILL break down when you need it most. My father tried for years to make an old car his daily driver, upgrading from one car to another to another. He finally sort-of made it work with a 1941 Buick, which is a fairly competent car, but he really didn't drive an old car to work until he bought a 1966 Cadillac in the '80s. Old cars are fun, but when you need to rely on it to get to work, it's a recipe for disaster.

 

If you want an old vehicle, buy a good one already finished that isn't modified like the one you describe. Or buy something like a Chevy SSR, which looks like an old truck but drives like a new truck. We have the attached flowchart as a poster in our showroom--work your way through it and see if you don't end up with a late-model instead.

 

1132087725_Carbuyingflowchart.thumb.jpg.904634be844084e31145320a9f42d308.jpg

Thank you so much for the share, this graphic is very helpful. I can see the areas where I have to spend a little more time in considering the hobby.

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OTOH minimum credula postero. Gonna step up the search for an XLR.

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On 3/2/2020 at 9:05 PM, 1939_Buick said:

 

Photos?

What is the transmission? (Plymouth will not bolt to a Cheby

 

Chrysler - Mopar Australia had a range of early 30's utes/pick ups

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coupé_utility


 

 

 

https://www.smh.com.au/national/1935-plymouth-coupe-utility-20050921-gdm3rm.html

 

https://meguiarsonline.com/forums/showthread.php?17471-1933-Plymouth-Pickup-truck/page2

 

 

 

This is the one that caught my eye recently:   https://classiccars.com/listings/view/1310758/1939-plymouth-truck-for-sale-in-hamilton-ohio-45015

And thanks for the share to the other blogs.

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On 3/2/2020 at 9:10 PM, lump said:

Sam the cat: You can see that there are several different perspectives here. One reason for that is that some of us LIKE to work on older vehicles, and enjoy puttering around with them almost as much as we do driving them. We expect these older vehicles to have a misstep now and again, and don't get terribly upset if we must spend time under the hood to keep them going. If you don't have those skills, and tools, garage space, and equipment...you might find yourself at a disadvantage. 

 

In MY opinion, having an older vehicle like this is a great idea. And driving one all over the place, every chance you get, is also a great idea. But if you are a total novice, depending on a vehicle like this for important daily transportation might leave you disappointed (and your boss at work might not be pleased either, if you show up late too often). 

I hear you and I understand. I don't wan to get distracted by the beauty of the car and forget to recognize the reality of owning it.

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On 3/2/2020 at 10:00 PM, keithb7 said:

That’s quite a flow chart. Pretty accurate.
 

I don’t own 1 vintage vehicle. I own two. Neither are daily drivers. Nor would I want them to be. I fall into the category of “Enjoying wrenching on them as much or more as driving, or looking at them”. I have amassed quite a tool collection and it keeps growing every year. I have not paid a mechanic to troubleshoot or repair my cars. I keep ‘em running. On a pretty tight budget too. 
 

An old daily driver can come with many challenges. Today’s car culture is sure a lot different than back when our  vintage cars were new. Today people get in a car and can probably drive it 65,000 miles and do nothing except oil changes. The thought of  regular minor and major brake adjustments escapes many. Regular valve settings? 50-ish grease points every 1000 miles. A Valve grind? Setting points. Fuel setting adjustments for winter and summer temps? You have to be up on your brakes regularly. Brake systems tend to leak as today’s replacement parts sure ain’t your Grand-daddy’s parts. Do you know what a single reservoir master cylinder is? You’d better, you life depends on it.  No second chances. There’s no guarantee you won’t snap a Mopar driveshaft off if you  yank on your park brake in an emergency. 
 

Safety is a big one. Sure I drive my old cars. However only a fraction of the total time I’m on the roads. So I am not exposed to high-danger collision very often. Old cars  crumple. Bodies fly. Sure you can install seat belts, their actual effectiveness in a vintage car is minimal. 
 

What was an average hi-way speed in 1952? 55 mph? 1942, 45 mph? Today what, 70 mph? These old cars were not designed to drive or stop at those speeds.

 

Sure all these issues can be addressed. Add seat belts. An overdrive on the tranny. Modern brakes with a dual reservoir master cylinder. Breaker-less solid state ignition. Covert to 12V for modern gadgets. It’s only money right? Big money if you don’t the work yourself. Many before you have indeed done it. 

 

You asked for advice and opinions... I’d say no. I Would not recommend a vintage car as a daily driver for you. It can be done yes. But a newbie with no experience or tools?  Not favorable. A big fat wallet helps but you’ll get no satisfaction once the novelty wears off. 
 

I won’t even recommend a vintage car to someone if they don’t plan to do most all repairs and maintenance themselves. Best case scenario they have a shop, and a good tool inventory. At least a little mechanical understanding. Plus a desire to dig in and learn. A big plus is they have a different car as a daily driver.  
 

That’s just me and what suits my lifestyle.  I love my old cars. I love getting in there and getting greasy. I enjoy the solitude in my stress free, social media free, drama free garage. Hours and hours of my time out there has been very rewarding and educational.  If when I pass my family sends my cars to an auction I don’t care. In my lifetime they brought me much joy and memories. What happens to my old cars when I’m gone is irrelevant. 
 

 

Thank you so much for taking the time to share. Your thoughts are very convincing.

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On 3/3/2020 at 1:32 AM, John_S_in_Penna said:

 

Sam, where do you live?  Is it a congested urban

area, or a small town-and-country area with plenty

of back roads to choose?  Are the roads paved?

 

Big cities aren't conducive to enjoying older, slower cars,

but small towns and countryside can be excellent!

You don't want a stressful experience--you want

a happy, relaxed experience with your older car.

 

Old cars don't necessarily cost more to repair a

specific fault, but they require more maintenance;

and being older, they will need a bit more repair.

You won't be seeing 100,000 problem-free miles as on

a modern Toyota.

 

I figure that any new purchase may need a few repairs,

so be sure your budget has some flexibility.  Choose a 

good example, ideally from a conscientious old-car hobbyist.

If you drive your old car 200 to 2000 miles a year, for instance,

your repairs should be minimal if you chose a good example.

"Better to buy a classic and baby it," as you say.

Well, my wife and are military so we don't have any roots and probably won't for the next few decades. We'll most likely bounce back and forth between the states and oversea's tours. Being able to afford one has pushed me to discuss it more, but we're on the verge of heading to Italy this year and know the timing isn't right. Though, perhaps the timing won't be right for a while.

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On 3/3/2020 at 8:45 AM, MCHinson said:

Sam The Cat, 

There have been some serious responses to your post. There have also been some attempts at humor. I think that almost everybody here would suggest that if you have an interest in an old car or truck, you should pursue your dream. Most of us also realize that a newbie with little mechanical aptitude is likely to be overwelmed with attempting to keep a modified truck on the road as a daily driver. Where are you located? Perhaps there is a local AACA Chapter or Region near you. I would encourage you to reach out to someone who is local who is experienced in the hobby who can take a look at the truck with you. With the limited amount of information you have given about the truck so far, I would suggest that this particular truck is likely not the best starting point for you in the hobby.  Lots of additional information is needed to give you any more detailed advice. For example, if you live in a colder climate where salt containing chemicals are used on the roadways, an antique vehicle is not going to be a logical year round daily driver.  Do you have an enclosed garage space available to park your vehicle? Please tell us more details so we are better able to help you. 

I get that and it makes sense. I wish I could oblige, but work is demanding right now, as are the kids. What I can say is that we're headed to the mountains in Italy for the next few years, who knows after that. I know nothing of our living conditions yet.

At night I get caught up in the dreams about and I drool over the pictures. But, reading through people's experiences about the hobby brings me back down to earth. Money isn't the issue it seems, but time and resources.

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On 3/3/2020 at 10:26 AM, Matt Harwood said:

I don't think anyone is discouraging him, just guiding him into making the right choice. Although I'm a big proponent of original cars and using them regularly, for a first-timer of any sort, a cobbled up car (perhaps even a made-up one if the lack of real 1935 Plymouth trucks is any indication) is a mistake. Add in the fact that our new friend isn't sure of his abilities or even if he should go more modern and add A/C and stereo, and he wants to drive it every day, and, well, that's the guy I steer over to a late-model Mustang or Corvette or Chevy SSR (which is what I'd recommend in this case since it's trucky). Still fun, still interesting, still welcome at most local cruise nights, but without the hassles of an old or made-up car. I think helping someone make the right choice--even if that choice isn't to become an old car guy in the strictest sense--is more important that talking them into a potentially wrong choice just to hopefully have another person in the hobby.

Ok, I get you. However, not interested in spending the money on anything but a Plymouth truck. Something about that particular car draws me in.

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On 3/3/2020 at 4:11 PM, Tinindian said:

My daily driver for 59 years was my Grandfathers 1930 Pontiac.  As my Grandparents raised me this car was in my life as long as I can remember.  I was there when he changed a tire, did a tune up, replaced a broken axle etc.  When I started driving it in 1959 when it had 99,000 miles it was not as a novice.  I had been in and around it for my entire 17 years.  I drove it to work every day and have been to every state west of the Mississippi in the US and everywhere in Canada west of  Fort William (not Thunder Bay).  I drove it approximately a thousand miles a month and only had to be towed home three times in the 400,000 miles that I put on the car.  I had a few breakdowns on the road, some two thousand miles from home.  All of these I was able to fix on the side of the road.  

There are some interesting books out there about touring in the teens, twenties and thirties.  You should read several of these as well as a thirties or fourties shop manual.  You need to understand how the engine, transmission, differential and electrical work on the vehicle you are thinking of buying.  You need to know exactly what modifications were done to it and what parts were used.  Then you need to understand any differences in maintenance and repairs between what the vehicle had and now has.

I am not trying to be difficult but there are mechanics out there who work on Cadillacs', BMWs', Porsches' and other very advanced cars  who have no idea how to replace a set of ignition points.  This whole forum would not be here if there were mechanics up the street to fix our cars.  You need to be the person to diagnose and repair yours vintage vehicle or at least be able to explain to us or others what your problem is.  

I have never hesitated to head off on a trip of any length with my car.  I know the car and I have the tools with me to fix almost anything on the side of the road.  I have enjoyed every mile of travel in my Pontiac, in town and out of town on rural roads and interstates.

Good luck with whatever choice you make.

Thank you sharing a small part of your story. And I love the pictures!

Unfortunately, I'm the type of guy that has put handyman stuff on the backburner. My expertise on the civilian side is in bible and theology so I maintain readings on that, and in the military sector it is logistics. So I read up on regs and other military material. In between work and family life, I haven't the passion to dive into mechanics yet. Maybe later in life?

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Just now, Sam The Cat said:

Ok, I get you. However, not interested in spending the money on anything but a Plymouth truck. Something about that particular car draws me in.

 

Can you post pictures of the car/truck that has you smitten? As the others have said, Plymouth trucks didn't exist in 1935, so it's important to make sure you're identifying and falling in love with the right vehicle. Lots of sellers don't even know what they have so you might embark on a search for a 1935 Plymouth pickup when, in fact, such a thing doesn't even exist. We can help you identify the actual vehicle that has caught your eye and perhaps steer you in the right direction towards finding one that fits your needs.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Sam The Cat said:

This is the one that caught my eye recently:   https://classiccars.com/listings/view/1310758/1939-plymouth-truck-for-sale-in-hamilton-ohio-45015

And thanks for the share to the other blogs.

 

May be a Dodge/Fargo with a Plymouth badge

By the description with a Chevy 6 engine guess that is the truck referred to by you in post 1

By the norm for this site, is modified and not called a "restoration". 

 

Edit

http://www.specialinterestautosales.com/New_Home_Page.php

Referred to as 1938 Dodge in the dealers web site

Edited by 1939_Buick (see edit history)

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Classy guy @Sam The Cat. He took the time to respond to several of our posts individually. Reading the comments, yes go find a Plymouth truck. You only live once. Enjoy it. However, a daily driver? I remain convinced it won't be ideal.  The Plymouth truck as a second vehicle as a hobby to drive and enjoy? Go for it! If you have to pay someone else to maintain it? Who cares, if you have the money. Sounds like you spend a lot of time overseas. Buy yourself a treat for the times you are back home in the USA. You work too hard, too long away from friends, family and home. Spoil yourself a little. Get the truck of your dreams.

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An older restomod (still has single brakes) and a Muncie 4-speed (no idea if early (weak) or late (better).

 

OTOH there are so many great cars in Italy and since military is easy to bring one back after your tour (just helped a friend with an Innocenti). An earlier (not the four bolt wheels) Maserati Quatroporto comes to mind.

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This little pick up seems to be a pretty basic build.

One worry is that it has few miles on it.

If it is the one you want take it for a LONG test drive and run it fairly hard.

Its beauty is in its simplicity.

I say go for it if it turns you on.

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The truck looks great.  Other than trim and floor boards Dodge, Fargo and Plymouth trucks had the same body.  Fargo, a Canadian product. had wood floor boards the same year that Dodge had metal ones.  Frames and/or chassis may have been different, I do not know.  As the engine and transmission have been changed for sure maybe the entire chassis has been changed.  Might be a good deal.  My first job would be to find out what each of the modifications are specifically and have them listed in a book that I would carry in the truck at all times.

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1939 Plymouth Truck (CC-1310758) for sale in Hamilton, Ohio

1939 Plymouth Truck (CC-1310758) for sale in Hamilton, Ohio

 

1939 Plymouth Hot Rod Truck

Frame off Restoration approximately 100 test miles since built

Very Rare

Lots of money spent on this build

Being offered is a very cool and very unusual 1939 Plymouth pickup truck that has approximately 100 test miles since a frame off restoration into a very cool hot rod.  This vehicle stands out in a crowd, the body of the truck is very straight and the hot rod flat black paint is excellent.  The old Plymouth truck’s are very rare and this one is completely done and turn key ready.  Please do not hesitate to call with questions or to schedule and appointment to see this incredible vehicle as it will only take one person to look at this car before it is gone, Tom 513 608-8121.

 

 

Exterior Highlights:

The exterior of the car is flat out stunning with excellent hot rod flat black paint on an all steel body that is super straight.  This truck has excellent body fit on all panels.  The vehicle is equipped with the very cool short bed with brand new oak bed with stainless strips that really sets the truck off. This truck received a Frame off restoration and has been meticulously maintained since then.  This truck has no rust period.  The wheel and tire combination is absolutely awesome with cooper cobra tires on awesome black and chrome wire wheels that are new to the build.  Every aspect of the exterior of this truck is excellent as can be seen in the pictures but this one is even more spectacular in person.  Take a look at the pictures, this is one very sharp a Plymouth Truck.

 

Interior Highlights:

The interior of the truck is as nice as the exterior.  The vehicle features an awesome recovered black vinyl bench seat, all the upholstery is awesome and compliments the awesome quality of this truck.  The door panels, headliner, carpet, and dash are all in awesome condition.  The dash has a full compliment of autometer gauges.  The truck is equipped with a Grant Steering wheel.  The truck features it’s orginal heater that appears to be in excellent shape.   The truck has a very cool Hurst 4-Speed shifter.  The glass in the truck is new, the front windshield cranks out for air flow.  The truck is also equipped with a functioning cowl vent. Overall, as the pictures indicate, the interior of the truck is excellent and ready to go cruising.

 

 

Mechanical Highlights:

Mechanically this truck is equipped with a 235 cubic inch Chevrolet 6 Cylinder motor that has been rebuilt and modified.  The engine is equipped with an offenhauser intake with a Holley Carburetor.  The truck has an awesome finned polished aluminum valve cover that really sets off the engine compartment.  The truck is equipped with a set of custom headers.  This truck is equipped with a 4 speed muncie transmission that shifts smoothly.  The truck is equipped with an aluminum radiator.  This truck has a nice hot rod sound and runs strong.  The engine bay is in excellent shape.  The undercarriage is in excellent shape, everything has been sand blasted and painted if not new.  This is a very fresh build with approximately 100 test miles.   This is a truck you can get in and enjoy from day one and have an unbelievably sharp truck. 

 

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Going to the hills in Italy for a few years. Sounds interesting.

 

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Posted (edited)
On 3/2/2020 at 6:47 PM, keiser31 said:

Just to inform....the very first Plymouth truck was 1937.

Here is a photo of one....

1937 Plymouth truck.jpg

     Keiser 31,

     Your expertise on this vinate vehicle is not getting much play here.   Remeinds me of a guy who said to me, about my 34 Ford Tudor

    "My faher has a Model T Roadster just like that".  Apparently the Flat Earthers are everywhere.

   Turns out the subject truck is a 1939.   So much for fact based inquiries.

Edited by Paul Dobbin (see edit history)

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If the photos of that truck were really taken in that garage--the current owner's garage--with those other vehicles, it appears to be owned by someone who is responsible and passionate about order and cleanliness--which is a good thing of course.  It appears to be well done.  The only thing that concerns me, like Jack mentioned, is that it only has 100 miles on it since work was done.  A true proper hard test drive would be in order (they always are, but especially in this case).  If you really plan to drive it regularly, that's not much, but that's also something I might just be sounding picky about.  You don't know who did the work, and I mean know them, not just a name or place, so you don't know about the prospects of putting a lot of miles on it.  Its not like a 100 mile 2020 Toyota Camry that was designed, engineered, and built to last 200,000 miles.

 

In any case, if you like it and can buy it, do so.  It's about you learning and having fun with a vehicle that gets your attention.  I'm never one to criticize a person for buying an old car they can afford to mess with and enjoy.

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And another so-called "frame off restoration" that involves almost no restoration.  See the old George Carlin bit on "in your own words."

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