Sam The Cat

Would you recommend buying a classic to anyone?

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Posted (edited)

Yes, it keeps one more out of the junk yard.  Enjoy it and keep it under cover in the garage please.

Edited by kgreen (see edit history)
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From what I can find Plymouth did not have a pickup available  in the U.S. until the 1937 model was released in late 1936. I've seen some info stating that Plymouth did release a '34 and '35 model pickup under the Fargo marque in Canada that were based on the '34/'35 car designs. It was stated that some of these may have been sent to the U.S. to test interest but they were not marketed in the U.S.. It was also stated in some info, that most of the  supposed '34/'35 Plymouth pickups in this country were either conversions from cars or custom built units on car chassis. Plymouth, as well as Dodge, did market a "commercial car" panel delivery in those years that were car design based.

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Sam The Cat, 

There have been some serious responses to your post. There have also been some attempts at humor. I think that almost everybody here would suggest that if you have an interest in an old car or truck, you should pursue your dream. Most of us also realize that a newbie with little mechanical aptitude is likely to be overwelmed with attempting to keep a modified truck on the road as a daily driver. Where are you located? Perhaps there is a local AACA Chapter or Region near you. I would encourage you to reach out to someone who is local who is experienced in the hobby who can take a look at the truck with you. With the limited amount of information you have given about the truck so far, I would suggest that this particular truck is likely not the best starting point for you in the hobby.  Lots of additional information is needed to give you any more detailed advice. For example, if you live in a colder climate where salt containing chemicals are used on the roadways, an antique vehicle is not going to be a logical year round daily driver.  Do you have an enclosed garage space available to park your vehicle? Please tell us more details so we are better able to help you. 

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Posted (edited)
9 hours ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

 

Yes, you can buy and enjoy an old car or truck.

I agree with most people here.  I have several,

but don't claim to be a mechanic.  Everyone has

different training and talents, and, living in the

heart of antique-car country, I take my cars

to local independent mechanics who are fully

capable of working on old cars.

 

I would NOT recommend using this vehicle as your

regular car:  You'll enjoy the experience much more

if you keep it as a hobby.  If driven daily, your car will

deteriorate and depreciate, which is counter to what

old-car fans want!  I would also recommend what others

did:  Take your time, find just the right example, and

make sure it's not modified.  And keep it stock--don't

start adding things to try to make it into a modern car.

 

Check with local mechanics to see whether they can

work on older cars.  I think vehicles from the 1950's and up

should be fine with today's more experienced independent

mechanics.  Welcome to the hobby.  You and your family

can have many happy memories ahead.

John, I apologize if my initial comment didn’t make it clear, but OPs lack of skills or talent to maintain an old vehicle wasn’t part of my assessment. I know plenty of life long vintage car collectors/enthusiast/hobbyist/owners who wouldn’t know how to turn a wrench if their lives depended on it. But they know their own limitations, whether financial or skill levels, are fully committed regardless and don’t worry too many ifs, ands or buts.

 

As I’ve mentioned before, I’ve been (seriously and nearly full-time) involved with this hobby over 40 years (on two continents) and heard/read/seen more failures than successes (and continue hearing/reading/seeing former still) by those who may be enamored by the idea of having a cool old classic/vintage/etc car (or two) without ability, understanding & willingness to commit themselves comprehensively.

 

Kind of like if one wishes to pursue golf as a hobby, but worry about loosing their balls (pun intended) or scratching the clubs...

... or someone desiring to take on gardening, but worry if the sun won’t shine or rain will be too wet or pruning scissors will get dull...

 

... it should be obvious these likely aren’t the right hobby for them to pursue.

 

I could fill volumes of books with stories of individuals cursing this hobby and others involved with it to lowest levels, all because they decided to jump into the deep end without bothering to learn to swim and while being cheered by those already in the water or under it.

 

In my mind, if/when someone’s expressing OP type concerns on any hobby, I would hesitate recommending it to them, but especially if it requires substantial financial and time commitments right at the beginning.

 

Also, if my comments seem harsh, it might be because I’m not afraid of reality or shun away from it.
It is what it is.

Edited by TTR (see edit history)

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I don't think anyone is discouraging him, just guiding him into making the right choice. Although I'm a big proponent of original cars and using them regularly, for a first-timer of any sort, a cobbled up car (perhaps even a made-up one if the lack of real 1935 Plymouth trucks is any indication) is a mistake. Add in the fact that our new friend isn't sure of his abilities or even if he should go more modern and add A/C and stereo, and he wants to drive it every day, and, well, that's the guy I steer over to a late-model Mustang or Corvette or Chevy SSR (which is what I'd recommend in this case since it's trucky). Still fun, still interesting, still welcome at most local cruise nights, but without the hassles of an old or made-up car. I think helping someone make the right choice--even if that choice isn't to become an old car guy in the strictest sense--is more important that talking them into a potentially wrong choice just to hopefully have another person in the hobby.

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For this person I suggest a '73-'79 Caprice Classic. Dead reliable and easy to work on.

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12 hours ago, Rusty_OToole said:

I would absolutely recommend you NOT buy a vintage vehicle of any kind. They are a big waste of time and money.

Some of you seem to think I was joking when I wrote this. I absolutely was not. Knowing what I know now, I would not recommend anyone get involved with old cars. If you want a hobby that will take up all your time and money and drive you nuts what's the matter with girls?

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Posted (edited)

My Dad gave me my first 1931 Dodge Brothers coupe when I was 15 years old. I was already into older cars, but that was my chance to learn about mechanical systems. I don't see why anyone with a taste for learning should not buy an old car to learn on. Start out with a Model A Ford which you can get almost anything for. I started out with a tough car to find parts for, but it is what I started with. If you are avid enough to learn about them, almost any old car can be a starting off point. Yes, it will cost you a lot of money. Yes, it can be very frustrating. No way to know without trying. It can also be very rewarding and you will meet some wonderful people in the old car hobby.

Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)
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Let’s not overlook the question about having the classic car mentioned in the original post, as a daily driver. That’s a key point to many responses here. Getting into old cars is fine. A rookie with no tools or experience trying to use it as a reliable, daily driver?  That’s the hot topic. 

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11 minutes ago, keiser31 said:

My Dad gave me my first 1931 Dodge Brothers coupe when I was 15 years old. I was already into older cars, but that was my chance to learn about mechanical systems. I don't see why anyone with a taste for learning should not buy an old car to learn on. Start out with a Model A Ford which you can get almost anything for. I started out with a tough car to find parts for, but it is what I started with. If you are avid enough to learn about them, almost any old car can be a starting off point. Yes, it will cost you a lot of money. Yes, it can be very frustrating. No way to know without trying. It can also be very rewarding and you will meet some wonderful people in the old car hobby.


Good advise, starting with a Model A  would connect you to other A owners who would be happy to mentor you.
I cut my car learnin' teeth way back when by studying the parts illustrations and descriptions in WWII-era Sears and Wards catalogs.

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Posted (edited)

Your experience will be a lot like owning a "foreign" car in the early 1960's. And very few of those were good.

 

I started getting my hands on cars and working on them when I was 11 years old, 72 now. There are a lot of things you learn that are possibly counter-intuitive, un-obvious, and often times not transferable. What seems simple is not.

 

If I got old and couldn't work on y cars I would sell the stuff and get a decent Rolex watch. That and a new Chevy truck would be just fine. And that comes with a lot of experience.

 

I sold a car for $12,000 a couple years ago. Standing in the garage surrounded by a lot of little projects that watch looked pretty good.

 

Like Louis Prima said "Next time".

 

Bernie

 

Afterthought: Yeah, I need another old car like I need a $12,000 watch. Ain't a whole lot of difference.

 

 

Edited by 60FlatTop (see edit history)

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My first old (32 years at the time) car was my daily driver BUT my daily drive was just a couple miles, so feet could be my back-up, and I had access to a modern car for longer trips.  As a sole all-purposes transport I think it's iffy without some back-up if a repair takes a few days.  I think the OP should consider what the musts and nice to have items are - I would suggest that it is best to get a car which came with the features desired.  In other words, if you want AC, PS, PB, get a car which offered those options originally.  this gets back to having all the parts of the car engineered together.  I admit my anti-rod bias is showing.

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Because you are asking I'm fearful that you've already been bitten by the bug! The resulting disease  is usually not fatal, but it certainly can usher in consequential lifetime changes. So are you ready for a life style change, and are you ready to accept the never ending learning process that goes with it? It's not so much about the car you have in your sights, it's more about your willingness to pull the trigger, and accept what goes along with it. I doubt that you are going to find a simple answer to your question here. It's more about what drives you.

 

I think that it my surprise you to find out that many of us ask ourselves, often, what if. What if I had never done this, what if I had done this instead, and then there is why did I do it this way.  In my case it's impossible to give you a break down  of almost sixty years in the hobby, with a single answer. Speaking for myself I would not recognize myself without the hobby. on measure we are what we have become,and the hobby has helped define who I am. I would not recognize myself without that part of my life.

 

Bill

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Whatever you do in this hobby....do not expect to sell a car for more money than you restore it for. Find a car that you would like to save and keep.

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Once upon a time I had a choice beween a new Rolex Oyster and an Omega Speedmaster. Both were $100 but was A Lot at the time. Chose the Omega but it got stolen. Now I have a $99 Seiko chronograph but needs a battery and  wear a $26 digital watch because it can display texts and answer the phone.

 

That said in the 60s I had a gaggle of Jags (including an XK-150s roadster and an E-type (65-67 are best, still have headlight covers but now had an all syncho gearbox, do not understand the flat floor people unless they like to double clutch), a RHD MGA, and an MG-1100 box. None gave me any real trouble. Of course in the 60s they were mostly cheap.

 

Do agree that in the end you will have the same money in a nice car than a project so always buy the nicest one you can (only applies to those who must ask the question...)).

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4 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

Although I'm a big proponent of original cars and using them regularly, for a first-timer of any sort, a cobbled up car (perhaps even a made-up one if the lack of real 1935 Plymouth trucks is any indication) is a mistake.

 

Yes, even a largely original car with a different make of engine in it puts a new owner at a disadvantage because (to one degree or another) the vehicle is a one-off that's unique unto itself. With a modded vehicle, some information in a shop manual can be irrelevant or even harmful in terms of repair or maintenance. The year disparity makes me wonder if the truck even has a title or registration.

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My daily driver for 59 years was my Grandfathers 1930 Pontiac.  As my Grandparents raised me this car was in my life as long as I can remember.  I was there when he changed a tire, did a tune up, replaced a broken axle etc.  When I started driving it in 1959 when it had 99,000 miles it was not as a novice.  I had been in and around it for my entire 17 years.  I drove it to work every day and have been to every state west of the Mississippi in the US and everywhere in Canada west of  Fort William (not Thunder Bay).  I drove it approximately a thousand miles a month and only had to be towed home three times in the 400,000 miles that I put on the car.  I had a few breakdowns on the road, some two thousand miles from home.  All of these I was able to fix on the side of the road.  

There are some interesting books out there about touring in the teens, twenties and thirties.  You should read several of these as well as a thirties or fourties shop manual.  You need to understand how the engine, transmission, differential and electrical work on the vehicle you are thinking of buying.  You need to know exactly what modifications were done to it and what parts were used.  Then you need to understand any differences in maintenance and repairs between what the vehicle had and now has.

I am not trying to be difficult but there are mechanics out there who work on Cadillacs', BMWs', Porsches' and other very advanced cars  who have no idea how to replace a set of ignition points.  This whole forum would not be here if there were mechanics up the street to fix our cars.  You need to be the person to diagnose and repair yours vintage vehicle or at least be able to explain to us or others what your problem is.  

I have never hesitated to head off on a trip of any length with my car.  I know the car and I have the tools with me to fix almost anything on the side of the road.  I have enjoyed every mile of travel in my Pontiac, in town and out of town on rural roads and interstates.

Good luck with whatever choice you make.

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I wonder if the original poster of this thread is still around....

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Just as an aside, whenever on a trip I have four car related things: a tool kit , a DVM, a spare tire (not all cars come with), and a AAA Premier (250 miles towing).

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Buy it. Have fun with it. If you decide it's not for you, sell it. You'll most definitely lose money, but you'll have a lifetime of stories about how you once owned an antique Plymouth pickup to show for it. 

 

Owning a vintage car is not logical. If it absolutely had to make logical or financial sense, nobody would ever do it. 

 

Other than that, there's some good advice in this thread, if you choose to listen. 

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3 hours ago, keiser31 said:

I wonder if the original poster of this thread is still around....


He checked in. Probably saw how insanely passionate we are about vintage cars. We’ve got ourselves all knotted up in a debate with many different opinions. 
 

He quietly left and is currently checking out import tuners as a second option. Lol. 

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or Art Morrison chassis and LS engines...

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Thank you so much for the replies, I really appreciate the discussion. I haven't had anyone to turn to discuss this and I finally thought to reach out.

 

Work is busy right now, I don't have time to read through these comments not properly reply to them, I do really appreciate the comments though. Can't wait to read through everything!

 

And please, I've got 10 years in the Army next month, do not think you are going to hurt my feelings by calling out my stupidity or nativity. I am happy to learn and I appreciate a good ribbing.

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As far as I'm concerned you can't go wrong with the 235 Chevy 6.

They never stop running unless they run out of gas.

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what's the matter with girls?

 

 

well, you thought you were broke from the cars?

 

try again...........

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