George Smolinski

The Pick of the Day is a 2007 Duesenberg Model J

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It looks like they spent alot of money building it, but need to find a new upholsterer. That interior looks really crappy for some reason like you expect to find in a glass 32 Ford kit car that looks every part kit car for sale for 20G. 

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High build quality with a decent J details and a fairly good representation of the real thing.   Realizing that it is not supposed to be a Replica,  it is well done.

 

Although,  I agree on the interior.    Last thing finished,  and no money left in the budget is my guess.

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Direct link to Hyman's website:   https://hymanltd.com/vehicles/6546-2007-duesenberg-model-j-murphy-roadster/

 

You can buy a real one for that price,  just not a Muphy conv coupe.

 

n the early 2000s, the owner of a genuine Duesenberg Model J had the idea to build a thoroughly modern, usable, and road-worthy tribute to one of the most desirable of all Model Js: The disappearing top roadster by Murphy. Of course, nothing even close to what he envisioned existed in the market, so he enlisted the help of the experienced designer and prototype builder Steve Pasteiner of Michigan-based Advanced Automotive Technologies to build his vision from the ground up.

 

Mr. Pasteiner worked as a designer for General Motors for 22 years, ultimately rising to the position of Assistant Chief Designer for the Buick and Chevrolet divisions. He founded AAT as a prototyping and fabrication shop to serve the Detroit auto industry, producing numerous one-off show vehicles and other special projects. Pasteiner was passionate about Classic Era automobiles, and many of his designs reflected that – making him the ideal candidate to create this unique homage to the legendary Duesenberg J.

 

The question of scale was one of the earliest obstacles to overcome. A Duesenberg J is a big car, with a tall radiator and a standard wheelbase of 142.5 inches. Finding a platform large and robust enough was the first challenge. The solution came in the form of a 1-ton Ford E350 van, which had a suitably strong chassis, and importantly for the designers, the “Twin I-Beam” front axle which conveniently mimicked the look of the original Model J’s solid beam axle. AAT used a brand new E350 as their basis, stripping it down to a bare frame as the first order of business. It was then narrowed, and the rear cut off and replaced with a custom-built section that incorporated the Ford axle on a bespoke four-link setup with air ride springs. Using an original Lycoming twin-cam inline-eight was not a viable option, so the team utilized the E350’s existing Triton V10, which makes over 300 horsepower and 420 lb-ft of torque. The engine and transmission were moved more than a foot rearward, to accommodate the long-bonnet proportions of the design.

 

With the mechanical spec set, the next order of business was to create the body. Using the Murphy Roadster as inspiration, the team at AAT crafted a gorgeous, authentically detailed body out of fiberglass and steel and finished it in a striking combination of metallic silver and medium gray, with subtle red striping. The paint quality is simply outstanding and reflects the meticulous care paid to every aspect of this build. Details include dual side-mount spares with body-color covers, a functional rumble seat, suitably large period-correct headlamps, dual Trippe lights, and “STOP” lights with LED bulbs for safety. The quality of the coachwork is revealed in the impressively solid action of the doors, the even panel gaps, and thoughtful details like the piano-hinged covers over the side windows. While the body is true to scale and form of the original Murphy roadster, Steve Pasteiner took some artistic liberties with the detailing that give this car its unique identity. Most notable are the 20-inch custom billet wheels wrapped in black-wall Excelsior tires, which combine with the adjustable air-ride suspension to provide an aggressive stance.

 

The stunning interior features gorgeous red leather seats and door panels, accented with gray carpets and a body-color dash. The level of quality is worthy of the show floor at the Detroit Auto Show or the concours field alike. The removable hardtop is lined in red Alcantara, and it fits snugly against the windows. An array of gauges by Classic Instruments sit in a polished, engine-turned alloy fascia, balancing contemporary style and function with timeless classic looks. Modern equipment includes power windows, air conditioning, full sound system, and controls for the air ride suspension, all subtly integrated to keep the cabin on-theme.

 

Ford’s big petrol V10 is a highly capable engine designed for extreme duty, yet it isn’t necessarily the prettiest thing in standard form. So the designers worked around this by creating a bespoke cowling that allows for serviceability and cooling, and finished it in body colors to give the engine bay a clean and smooth look. In the interest of proportions and chassis balance, the engine sits nearly a foot further back in the frame, and custom fabricated cooling pipes are used to connect it to the radiator. Aside from the cold-air intake, the V10 is primarily stock, paired with the original automatic transmission. Power steering, power disc brakes from the E350, and air conditioning remain in place for ease of operation in all conditions. With the car showing just over 800 miles from new, everything looks fresh and impeccably clean under the hood.

 

This astonishing Duesenberg is a rare example of modern technology and Classic Era style blending seamlessly into one. Designed and built by a talented and experienced team, this fabulous automobile cruises effortlessly and is suitable for long-distance touring, show, or casual weekend drives, and is sure to draw a crowd wherever it takes its next owner.

 

 

 

Offers welcome and trades considered

 

$349,500

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Yes, because a Duesenberg J convertible coupe is just so slow, clumsy, and un-roadworthy. Who would want to drive one of those?!?

 

I always find it amusing that people justify their creations like this by saying they merely wanted something they can drive. If that's true, why does this thing have only 800 miles on it? I have a client who puts that many miles on his real Duesenberg every month in the summer. Besides, if I want something that drives like a Ford E350 cargo van, well, I can go rent one. If I want something that drives like a Duesenberg J, I'm pretty sure there's only one way to get that experience.

 

PS: How are all of you driving your antique cars on the roads? I understand that it's well nigh impossible.

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39 minutes ago, auburnseeker said:

Needs whitewalls. ;) 

 

49E3507F-835A-4A54-BCA8-F5E5970760FF.jpeg

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A reply to Matt Harwood. The Vintage Motor Touring Society will gather again starting this spring and in a group of up to 15 or so prewar vehicles we will cruise to a collection, a museum, a hobby or historical society or whatever the tour master chooses then stop for lunch. After lunch we all head home until the next months run. It doesn't get any better than driving an antique car. We avoid highways when possible but will run them when needed. We do the run on a weekday most months to avoid heavy traffic.

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8 hours ago, Steve_Mack_CT said:

Strangely, I dig the wheels... 😎

 

The wheels overpower the style of the car and make me think Rolls-Royce with those concentric rings.

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I have to admit that I like a lot about the car.  If it were mine I would probably paint it a darker color and would replace the automatic transmission with a manual. Not that I have $350,000 just sitting around anyway.  Just fantasizing. 

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Forgive my lack of knowledge on Duesenburg pricing, but how much is an authentic Murphy roadster in today's market?

I haven't laid eyes on a Duesy since I was in Vegas in the 90's at the Duesenburg Room display in The Imperial Casino.

 I could have set up a cot and stayed there for a few weeks!

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8 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

Yes, because a Duesenberg J convertible coupe is just so slow, clumsy, and un-roadworthy. Who would want to drive one of those?!?

 

I always find it amusing that people justify their creations like this by saying they merely wanted something they can drive. If that's true, why does this thing have only 800 miles on it? I have a client who puts that many miles on his real Duesenberg every month in the summer. Besides, if I want something that drives like a Ford E350 cargo van, well, I can go rent one. If I want something that drives like a Duesenberg J, I'm pretty sure there's only one way to get that experience.

 

PS: How are all of you driving your antique cars on the roads? I understand that it's well nigh impossible.


We put 800 miles on JN-565 in four days last October.........all on back roads and the Pacific Coast Highway. Car drove fine, had no issues, and was a pleasure. Any CCCA car is usually a decent driver, most are above average. The problem is too many people are too cheap or lazy to properly restore, sort, and drive their car. 

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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3 hours ago, edinmass said:


We put 800 miles on JN-565 in four days last October.........all on back roads and the Pacific Coast Highway. Car drove fine, had no issues, and was a pleasure. Any CCCA car is usually a decent driver, most are above average. The problem is too many people are too cheap or lazy to properly restore, sort, and drive their car. 

Pretty similar to Mopars of the late 30's to 40's,(obviously not of the same over all league) less maybe the Fluid drive cars, but of the ones I fixed,  they all drove stopped and started amazingly well.  Crazy reliable for sure.  It's nice to have an old car that someone probably thinks is well like most old cars , worn out, then have them drive yours,  that isn't.  When I was selling that 48 Plymouth ragtop, it started instantly and drove really well with a fresh front end and brakes.  The guys that drove it couldn't believe how nice it performed.  I think they were expecting a heap, probably because of the way it looked needing paint and all.  Even that 40 Ford I sold,  that still needed a little more,  the guys that drove it couldn't believe how much better it was than the ones they had been in prior to it. 

Now if I can just get the Auburn up to those specs,  I'll be a happy man.  It's just time and money. ;) 

Like my friend says,  they had to be decent and drive pretty good when new or they never would have sold.  If your old car runs or drives like crap,  it's because it needs work.  It's amazing the number of pretty cars out there that run and drive terribly.  

 

They could have made this Duessy clone more interesting and put a Cummins Turbo diesel in it.  I would have found that more interesting than the V10. 

Edited by auburnseeker (see edit history)
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They should of put a big straight 8 in it, something like a 356 Packard, at least it would of looked more period correct, but you can't drive it with 80 mph on the interstate in that case. But looking at 800 miles total it must drive like crap anyway otherwise they would of put more miles on it.

Edited by bdc (see edit history)
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On ‎2‎/‎28‎/‎2020 at 6:41 AM, Steve_Mack_CT said:

Strangely, I dig the wheels... 😎

Me too on that thought.

They do make it look "RR'ish".

I wonder if the government mandated wheels like this (without spokes) for all cars, how much gas would be saved ?

Can you say Bonneville  salt flats ?

 

Mike in Colorado

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18 hours ago, Steve_Mack_CT said:

Yeah too bad RR is doing gimmicky stuff now...

 

"May include, but not limited to.... the wheels"

 

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4 hours ago, 60FlatTop said:

 

"May include, but not limited to.... the wheels"

 


 

Barf! 🤮 Excuse Me! (Steve Martin voice)

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7 hours ago, bdc said:

They should of put a big straight 8 in it, something like a 356 Packard, at least it would of looked more period correct, but you can't drive it with 80 mph on the interstate in that case. But looking at 800 miles total it must drive like crap anyway otherwise they would of put more miles on it.

 

  I beg your pardon!!  My 1950 Buick straight eight can and does run 80 on the freeway. All day if I choose.  My 1950 Buick convertible did in 1955. 

 

  Ben

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Agreed, I always thought a Buick strait 8 would have made for a great powertrain fof a Duesenberg replica. 

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All those lovely details don't fix the truck-like proportions at RR since they were sold.

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18 hours ago, ericmac said:

Agreed, I always thought a Buick strait 8 would have made for a great powertrain fof a Duesenberg replica. 


The guy making engines uses a Buick rotating assembly as an option.  I guess the cyl centers are an exact match. 

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