Brass is Best

Why everyone should own a Fire Engine

Recommended Posts

Old Ford's 1 Ton based on a Model A Ford Truck really is a beautiful Fire Engine. Those are one ton wire wheels which utilize a 32X6 tire on a 20 inch rim. These were only used in the first three months of production on the one ton chassis. A lot of the stuff is basically considered AR. The truck lives about 3 miles from me and it has a very good home and sure is fun to see from time to time. Dandy Dave!  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I keep thinking about that one that has been converted into a hauler that shows up on for sale forum on occasion.

I would love to own that one.

The builder / owner stepped up to a bigger better one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I only have one question.... if you show up at a car show in a big ass fire truck, do you still need to have a little fire extinguisher on display with it?

  • Like 1
  • Haha 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Big Beat said:

I only have one question.... if you show up at a car show in a big ass fire truck, do you still need to have a little fire extinguisher on display with it?

 

Only if the big copper/brass ones are for show only !.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I finally found the photo of my '31 Bickle-Chevrolet pumping out of a washtub in 1964. One of the first "portatanks" I reckon.

1931 Chevy fire engine pumping from washtub 1964.jpg

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Big Beat said:

I only have one question.... if you show up at a car show in a big ass fire truck, do you still need to have a little fire extinguisher on display with it?

 

Here is your answer...

53gmc52.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

For those of you who still love the childlike feeling of seeing or riding a fire engine you might want to consider joining SPAAMFAA - the Society for the Preservation and Appreciation of Antique Motor Fire Apparatus in America.  Dues are $30 per year and they include a newsletter and quarterly magazine.  Take a look at the web site (soon to be receiving a major overhaul) and sign up!  http://SPAAMFAA.org There is also a calendar with listings of musters (a gathering of fire engines) and other firefighting related events.

 

Brass is Best - I really enjoyed the story that you used to begin this topic.  There is nothing like riding on a piece of fire apparatus.

 

I've never owned a fire engine, but I have 60 - 70k pictures of them so I'll throw one into this topic.

 

Ex-Bucyrus OH
1928 Seagrave
750 GPM - 200 Tank
#57450   Model: 6-D-W-T

Bucyrus OH - 1928 Seagrave.jpg

Edited by Steve Hagy
URL was incorrect. (see edit history)
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With the weather so nice yesterday, clear, sunny, and sixty some, I took my daughters and the younger ones boyfriend for a ride. He had never been in a fire truck. I’ve not seen him smile so big before. The girls loved it also

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fire Truck guys are a great bunch of people.........salt of the earth.......and crazy as hell. Never had so much fun at ANY show as a Spaamfaa meet............food, booze, and insanity. Everyone should attend once, just for the experience. 

 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
44 minutes ago, edinmass said:

Fire Truck guys are a great bunch of people.........salt of the earth.......and crazy as hell.

 

 

I have cousin in Las Vegas that's a fire truck guy.  Sounds just like him.  He bought one on eBay once, sight unseen, flew halfway across the county with plans to drive it home.  He did.  Said he got 4 mpgs and had to spend a night in Colorado with a flat waiting on someone who could actually change it.  Spent as much on the flat as he did the whole thing.  At one time he rented it out for kids birthday parties and such.  He's had a few different ones.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Our Fire Engine was the 1951 Ford F-6,

Built by The Boardman Company in Ohio for the Monsanto Chemical Plant across the highway from my daughter's subdivision in Luling, Louisiana.

It carried 500 gallons of water, could hook to a hydrant, or could draft from a bayou or pond from either the right, or the left side, and could pump 500 gallons per minute at 250 psi, or 250 gallons per minute at 500 psi. The big Federal Siren mounted on the front bumper didn't have a brake, and would drone on for what seemed an eternity. The roof siren was the same, but with a higher pitch, and the huge chrome bell let folks know she was headed their way. She was equipped with a 2-speed differential, as well as a "Granny Extra Low" gear, so walking alongsside her during parades was a hoot - watching a Fire Engine with "No Driver" and a Dalmatian in the driver's seat, as I held a fake remote control.

 

The ENGINE served Monsanto from 1951 until 1966 when it was donated to the St. Rose, Louisiana Volunteer Fire Department.

In 1978, St. Rose needed a larger unit and donated the '51 Engine to the Bayou Gauche Volunteer Fire Department, also in St Charles Parish, as is the Monsanto plant, so the Engine served its entire working life in St. Charles Parish, Louisiana.

It served the Bayou Gauche community until I bought it in 1988. Still certified, I used the ENGINE, properly equipped,

for the NEW ORLEANS FIRE DEPARTMENT's 100th Anniversary Muster,

as well as Touring with the Louisiana Region AACA.

 

When our local club hosted the Annual Louisiana Tour, our '51 ENGINE was a big part of the tour.

She proudly flew the big American Flag.

We iced down the hose bed and carried all the food and beverages to the lunch stop at the Carillon Park outside of Morgan City.

A bit of rain got some of the tour cars messy, and upon their return to the host hotel,

THE HIGH PRESSURE FOG unit built onto the engine's tailboard was a delight to many of the owners who appreciated our impromptu "Car Wash".

It did have a stiff ride after the car washing incident used up nearly all of the 500 gallons carried on-board. Without the extra weight of the 500 gallons of water, the ride home  became too firm for my wife. She bailed out on me and got into the back seat of another member's 1954 Ford Club Coupe. After only a few miles cramped up in that little seat, she was back, riding proudly in the Fire Engine, but warning me that the extremely bumpy ride might leave her with two black eyes.

 

Whenever I started that old 1951 Flathead, two of our Dalmatians, Gypsy and Dottie, dashed out of the house and were ready for Parade Duty on "THEIR ENGINE" !

We also hosted tons of neighborhood kids riding our engine for dozens of parades for Mardi Gras, French Quarter Festival, Cruise Nights, club picnics, and many other activities.

 

We passed the ENGINE to a group of brothers and sisters who owned and operated Edie's restaurant at the intersection of Pinhook Road and Kaliste Saloom in Lafayette, Louisiana. The placed was named for the youngest sister - Edie.

 

Thanks for a great memory.

Edited by Marty Roth (see edit history)
  • Like 6
  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Here is a hint on how to enjoy a firetruck show.......go on ebay, and buy T shirts........one with each major firetruck brand...........get six or seven different ones..........Mack, Seagrave, American LaFrance, ect then place them in a bag and go to the meet. Find the truck with the biggest and best party going...........they convert many of them with a grill, keg draft system, music, ect............when you see the one with the best party going, place that truck's brand shirt on and just walk up and join the fun.......they don't ask for ID........they just hand you a drink and say help yourself! When I spent a few hours at the last meet, they let me drive the back position on the 85 foot ladder truck........it was fantastic fun, and I was reasonably sober!

 

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

On our way back from one of our first musters near Hamilton,Ont.,we were driving on a four lane highway when a big Cadillac Eldorado pulled up along side us and rolled down his window. Talking to another driver at 55 MPH wasn't working so we pulled into a parking lot. The guy was asking us all kinds of questions about the '31 Bickle-Chevy. Turns out he was Bill King,president of King-Seagrave Fire Engines in Woodstock. I told him I had heard that somewhere there was a big oak box of old factory photos of Bickle apparatus (later Bickle-Seagrave,then King-Seagrave). He told me that he still had it at his home and invited us to come see him.We arrived at his beautiful pillared home and were ushered up the spiral staircase to the master bedroom ,where the box was stored in a closet. On a second visit,we set up a camera and two tripods and photographed the pictures. The pictures range from the 'teens to the '50's. I still have them in an album.Attached is a 1918 Bickle-Chevrolet Model T that went to Campbellford,Ontario, and another Chevy that was purchased by the Sudbury,Ontario fire department.

1918 Bickle- Chevrolet Model T fire engine.jpg

1918 Bickle-Chevrolet Model T hook and ladder truck.jpg

Edited by J.H.Boland (see edit history)
  • Like 3
  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Marty Roth, that’s what it is all about to me. Saving a little bit of history for the younger people to enjoy. I enjoy history anyway so saving an old fire truck is just part of it to me. Everyone that owns an old vehicle is doing that weather it’s all original or restored. For me, I enjoy see the smiles it brings to the people of all ages that see my fire trucks. I’ve seen it from the neighbors kid, maybe 5ish to my father in law that’s 80+. Everyone seems to like fire trucks. Mike

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Frankenmuth circa 2004 SPAAMFAA National Muster sponsored by Great Lakes International Fire Apparatus Association

 

 

Frankenmuth Muster 2004.jpg

Firetruck Frankenmuth 2.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A Muster is one of the most wonderful things to see.  Engines and other apparatus pumping not to mention the cameraderie.  The very best of horse drawn, steam and internal combustion events ever.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A friend of mine [just retired] took me on a tour of the Pierce Manufacturing plant. I have to say it was the most interesting plant tour I have ever been on. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/28/2020 at 10:43 AM, DAVES89 said:

A friend of mine [just retired] took me on a tour of the Pierce Manufacturing plant. I have to say it was the most interesting plant tour I have ever been on. 

 

 

The Sutphen plants near Columbus OH are also very cool.  We were visiting Mr. Sutphen's vintage car (and boat) collection with our club but were distracted by a new apparatus being pump tested in their pond.  A few of us wandered over to the manufacturing building and Mr. Sutphen saw our interest.  He gave us his business card and sent us over to the other facility the following day for a '3 hour tour' by the Plant Manager.  Unfortunately Mr. Sutphen has now passed.  Haven't heard if his collection survived. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

I will happily contribute to this thread. I am a member of my local vintage car club. The club owns this Ford LaFrance fire engine. Or is it a truck? 
 

This is an original vehicle from my city’s fire department. Flathead V8. I think 1932? Sound about right?

 

Wife wife is seen here helping get it ready for a parade. We help the car club dress it up and take it out. The kids do indeed love it. 
 

 

4A0E7540-8F1B-45D3-AC2A-B3A648B8FBC3.jpeg

Edited by keithb7 (see edit history)
  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, keithb7 said:

I will happily contribute to this thread. I am a member of my local vintage car club. The club owns this Ford LaFrance fire engine. Or is it a truck? 
 

This is an original vehicle from my city’s fire department. Flathead V8. I think 1932? Sound about right?

 

Wife wife is seen here helping get it ready for a parade. We help the car club dress it up and take it out. The kids do indeed love it. 
 

 

4A0E7540-8F1B-45D3-AC2A-B3A648B8FBC3.jpeg

 

Pretty sure it's a 1937.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was out mowing the yard today. One of my neighbors was out for a walk with her son. I stopped and asked him if he would like to look at my fire truck. He looked to his mom for approval and said yes. I walked through the yard and they walked down the road and he still beet me there. I opened up the door and sat him in the drivers seat and was all smiles. That’s one of the reasons I own a fire truck. I made his day and he made mine

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/27/2020 at 6:47 PM, Big Beat said:

I only have one question.... if you show up at a car show in a big ass fire truck, do you still need to have a little fire extinguisher on display with it?

 

 

Yes, you do need to have a fire extinguisher that works if safety checked by our SPAAMFAA Chapter. 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This picture took me forever to find...

 

In May 1969 my father bought this 1930’s Seagrave that was just then retired from the South Newfane Vermont Fire department. That is me again on the running board. Dad only had it for a few months, we were in a 4th of July parade and not long after someone hunted him down to buy it. 
 

I remember the truck and parade well considering I was 3 at the time, I think the helmet is with one of my brothers...

D2C585B0-4A66-488B-808F-C365812492C4.jpeg

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now