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Im new. Advise needed

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Ive always wanted a car from the 50s.

Any advise on choosing a car without getting stuck with a lemon.

Im weary about buying through ebay without seeing the car.

I want something from the late 50s possibly a convertable.In excellant condition. All original or proffesionally redone. Is there a preimer 50s Guru That redoes these vehicles and has a grand reputatio????

THX

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Any reasonably competent restoration shop should be able to handle an American car of the 1950's. I would recommend you concentrate on Chevrolets, because there is such a wide base of parts support. By the 1950's, ALL American cars were essentially "assembled" from parts supplied by major specialty parts manufacturers, with the car "manufacturers" making only SOME of the exterior sheet metal stampings..... so the quality is pretty much the same.

If you will tell me where you live, I MAY be able to recommend a shop to you.

Pete Hartmann

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Hello, Welcome to the hobby! If you are looking for a restored late '50's car, find a shop that specializes in '50's cars only. Same can be said for Classics, you want to find a shop that likes the era car you are looking for. If a shop has spent years doing '58 Chevies it will know a lot more about them than a shop that does PreWar cars.

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Don't worry about getting a lemon, worry about finding something that you will enjoy! Find that car that trips your trigger and that will make you want to go to shows, drive around the neighborhood or go touring with. There are a lot of great shops in the country that can restore these cars...this is not difficult. You also can buy a real nice car, already done at major auctions or thru a variety of other selling options. This might be the "cheapest" way.

Let people know what area in the country you are in, AACA has chapters all over the country and someone in these clubs would love to help you check out a car or give you advice. Unless you know what you are doing, don't attempt to buy a car without help.

There sure are a large quantity of Chevys and Fords to choose from although you might want something "different"...I have always enjoyed showing brass era Olds because they are scarce and it adds a little extra fun. In the 50's there are a lot of orphan convertibles as well as products that are a little unusual that you might want to try. Good luck, it is a great hobby and you will find a lot of folks willing to help you get started laugh.gif

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> Is there a preimer 50s Guru That redoes these vehicles and has a grand reputatio???? </div></div>

I'd say that this is probably a question best reserved until a choice is made as to <span style="font-style: italic">which</span> '50s car you'd like to purchase or restore. Obviously this would depend on your tastes and interests as well as your wallet.

I'd reccommend researching specific models of cars (Chevrolet, Ford, MG, VW, Studebaker, etc.) and determine which one most interests you <span style="font-style: italic">and</span> which one you can feel comfortable investing in (time, money, and sweat). The worst thing that you can do in this hobby is to overwhelm yourself with to complex a project on the first try. Peter's reccommdation of a Chevy for a first car is a good one, it is a simple car with plentiful parts and expertise. Other good cars to start with would include Ford and VW. Even an early Thunderbird, though initially expensive, is a very simple car with few hard-to-find pieces.

After that choice is made, then the best thing to do is to get in contact with the national and (especially) the local car club specializing in that type of car. If you choose a Tbird, the local Tbird club members will be able to provide all the information you need regarding whose work is the best and who to avoid.

Armed with that information, then the fun can begin!!! smile.gif

Good Luck!!!!

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I am a lot like oldcarsnut, I enjoy something different. Buicks fit the bill for me. Find something you like the looks of and is comfortable to drive.

Unless you buy something totally off the wall, parts are easy, for the most part, to obtain.

Set a budget and spend time looking. You will be amazed at what you find. Buy the best car you can, while it is fun to work on them, its much more fun to drive them.

Enjoy your new hobby

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If your finances are limited, make sure that you get a car with either good, or little chrome. Chrome replating will kill you, and there are a lot of people who are out there who aren't that good that'll charge you an arm and a leg. If you take a car like a Buick (nothing against buicks guys) there is enough chrome on that car to where the average working man with a family would have to remortgage his house just to have enough money to pay for the chrome on it.

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Just paid the final chrome bill on a 1953 Buick Skylark Convertible. We did every piece on the car including interior trim, 5 wire wheels, etc. Total bill was slightly in excess of $20,000, done by one of the best platers and the stuff is as perfect as it gets. In chrome plating, like most things, you get what you pay for. We've noticed an increasing interest in '50's pickup trucks, partly I think because of the small amount of chrome and simple interiors.

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Get what turns you on. Decide on your budget,be prepared for "surprises". Decide on the extent you are willing to go.

Is this to be a driver or pure show car?

Do you have the ability and tools needed to complete the job?

Do you have a place to work on it?

Do you like the car? (if anything but a resounding YES!, then rethink your decision.)

Look at as many as possible, speak to as many people in the industry as possible.

Have fun!!!

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$20,000 for chrome on a '53 Buick Skylark? I REST MY CASE!! Nice car by the way. I like those better than I do anything that vintage. That car has a lot of class. That big chrome grill and the chrome spoke wheels give that car a lot of class. My dad and I did a '37 pickup and paid over $1,000 for two bumpers, grill badge, hood ornament, two window cranks and four door handles so comparing the amount of chrome versus your car is nothing.

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Can you imagine what the price of chrome plating on a 58 Limited would be.. shocked.gifshocked.gif

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$20,000 for chrome on that '53 Skylark is more than we paid to do our whole truck. The thought of that scares me enough. I mentioned Buick because Buick seems to have the reputation of not skimping on their cars when it comes to chrome, interiors, etc.

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I have more money in chrome on the 57 T-Bird than I do in the entire rebuilt drivetrain on the Model A.

The good news is that I take my own advice - I never save the receipts to avoid the depression that hits when you add up all your expenses.

Oh well - I could be blowing the cash in more foolish ways I guess. At least I have something to show for it at the end of the day (besides a hangover!)

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Just look at it as an addiction. Some people are addicted to drugs, alcohol, gambling but we are addicted to CARS. Everyone has to have an addiction it's just with ours we can have something to show for it and it requires space. Between my father and I we have 17 cars, so I'd say we're hooked pretty bad.

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