Jump to content

Recommended Posts

It comes down to who put the cover on? previous owner, machine shop or shade tree mechanic along the way. It looks a bit sludgy in there  up against the snout flange in the picture for a new rebuild. May be not. The good thing is you have found the problem and no apparent damage done. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

The cover and gear were installed by the engine machine shop who "rebuilt" the engine. . The owner never touched the engine. They also painted the engine after it was assembled, including the aluminum heads. Owner told them he specified don't paint the heads. They pulled the heads to remove the paint and reinstalled the heads using the same gaskets and also had never used thread sealer on the studs. There was coolant coming out the top of the studs and around the perimeter of the heads like crazy. I made some calls and found out that the person with experience in the shop had quit just before this engine was worked on. They also forgot to install the bolt and thick washer that hold the crank pulley on. I also had to rebuild the carb that they said they rebuilt. My friend paid a lot of money for this "rebuild". Anybody know of a good lawyer? 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Dave for including us in the findings step by step, with helpful photos!  A good lesson learned by many now to pack away back in our memory & to keep an eye out for should we ever need it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Page one second March 11 post I mentioned crankshaft web   oil gallery welch  plugs. Before you fit pan you could check if they have been replaced. About 12.  After a crank grind they should be removed and the oil sludge trap cleaned out along with any crank grindings. Theres a large hole behind them for sludge to collect, the later LZ motors didn't have them from 39? on.  New plugs are pressed in, tricky job  with threaded bolt and nut. Easier with motor out! Those grey felt pro head gaskets are best.   Happy Days.

Edited by 38ShortopConv. (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites

Glad that you found it. The photo that you posted showing the idler gear had me wondering, I could not figure out why there were no gear teeth showing.

 

Before you reinstall the engine, check all of the other sources of low or no oil pressure. There could be more than one thing wrong. They may have left out the pressure relief valve, thinking that the one on the pump would do the job.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

My 39 has those crank plugs, they were removed and the crank cleaned, plugs replaced. Fortunately, the guy that did my engine was a good experienced mechanic with an amazingly equipped machine shop. Unfortunately, he went out of business before my friend was ready to have his engine done.(long story). The plugs in his crank look like they haven't been touched. 

 

The rest of the engine checked out OK. As for the pic looking into pump hole, you have to look real closely and you can see the edge of the gear teeth towards the rear of the hole. They are now in the center of the hole.

 

Edited by zephyrdave (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites

I spoke too soon about the rest of the engine checking out OK. I decided to pull the heads. Check out that block resurfacing job or lack there of. You can see where coolant had leaked into cylinder and coolant stain on piston. This is disgusting. Monkeys could have done a better job on this engine. This company has been around since at least the 50's so it's not how long you are in business, it's the people you have employed. The business was started by the current owner's father. I guess the son doesn't give a sh....Also, I think all this staying at home stuff is making me more angry than usual. This is not even my engine, I just don't like seeing a friend getting ripped off. 

house shingles  and 37 unresurfaced block 007.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 months later...

Just an update if anyone is interested as to what happened. The builder took the engine back and over the course of 5 months machined the deck, installed new pistons, bearings and gaskets, cleaned crank and installed new core plugs all at no charge. I got the engine back and took the pan off to install the rear main bearing oil drain. Noticed that 6 of the pistons were installed backwards and the rod numbering did not match the cylinder numbering. Told builder who was very apologetic and will be supplying gasket set for me. I have taken pistons and rods out and re-installed properly. All T slots in skirts are toward driver side now.

1937 lincoln install pistons 003.jpg

1937 lincoln install pistons 002.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

For most of my years of owning a collector car, I have done most of my own work. Now that I am well into my 80's, I have had my car worked on by other people and am disgusted with the quality of work that they do and the amount of time that they charge for on simple operations. Even when you get a recommendation, you can have serious problems with the work.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...