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Restorer32

Finding cars

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4 hours ago, auburnseeker said:

I've heard stories of an Auburn speedster that was restored in a guys basement but no way to get it out as he brought all the pieces in and then built it with no way to get the finished car out.  Could just be urban legend as well.  It was in upstate NY. 


That is kind of an old legend with various twists that has circulated about over the years. In my years as a rural mail carrier I kept hearing about someone who had an old Corvette in his basement. Eventually I did get to the bottom of the mystery. This fellow had a 1955 Corvette in a little shed in his back yard. The story goes that years ago he disassembled it and brought parts down his basement to refurbish. He was very reclusive and would neither talk about or allow one to see what was going on. I did gain his confidence enough that he told me about it. Can’t see it though, until it’s done. Well.....he eventually passed on. Yes, it was a 1955 Corvette. I  was allowed to view the project by a relative taking care of the estate. The unrestored body shell was sitting on a mostly restored chassis. Engine still down the basement in pieces. The rest scattered about the house. Later that week  I helped a relative push the car on a trailer and I watched it all go down the road. Never found anything else out about it.

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2 hours ago, Jeff Perkins / Mn said:

The unrestored body shell was sitting on a mostly restored chassis.

 

Imagine going into a garage and finding an unrestored chassis and a restored body. Now, that would be a rare find indeed!

 

By the way, I sold the King Midget pictured above. Honest, some clown came along and had to have it. A real one.

Edited by 60FlatTop (see edit history)
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About forty years ago I bought a load of square bale hay and straw at auction.  It was stored in a barn and the house on the property.  As we were removing the bales from the house my son found that he was standing on a 1923 T touring.  We drove home and got a trailer.  As we were leaving the property the local cop pulled us over and wanted to know where it came from.  He had grown up on the farm and the T was grandpa's.  A deal was struck and we delivered it to has home.

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Not so much a find by me as plenty of ACD collectors knew about the two Auburns in the Fort Plain, New York area by old-time garage owner and former Kaiser-Frazer sub-dealer Everett Pye had stored.  One was a '34 850Y convertible sedan in the garage.  The other was a '33 12-161A speedster stored inside a school bus!  It was in need of an extensive restoration and has since been restored and shown at major concours.  His yard was a collection of various makes he had kept from trades and just interest in old cars, included many Kaisers and Frazers, a sharknose Graham, a '38-'39 Hupmobile Six, various postwar Packard, Studebakers and even a '32 Ford V8 Victoria.  It was a fascinating place to visit and he was an interesting and knowledgeable fellow.   The environment was particularly hard on the cars, in a narrow valley near a creek, very damp.  Some few of the cars were saved including the Auburns but most of the others are only a memory for those of us that saw them.   Ironically, when we left traveling south we came to the corners of Sprout Brook, New York.  Its claim to fame?  Its the birth place of Henry J. Kaiser.  

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A story told to me years ago by a neighbor was too good to be true. He mentioned three brand new 1931 Plymouths in a railroad car that he found on an abandoned railroad in the woods of northern Michigan. He ended up keeping one, giving one to the Chrysler Corporation folks and selling the third one. I have no idea if it was true or not, although he DID have photos of his '31 Plymouth to show me.

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A 1953 Buick Skylark convertible, yellow, sitting on concrete blocks and missing the wire wheels. A guy bought the property and found the car abandoned in an old shed in the back. He traded it to my father for an adding machine in about 1975. When we went to look at the car, we found it had less than 60,000 miles and the body was completely straight and rust-free. My Dad offered to give it to me, but my then-wife looked at it and said, "Oh, that's ugly." I was young, freshly married and too easily influenced back then. We just left it there, darn it. Never knew what happened to it.

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