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Battery replacement


rrs814
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Robert, I'm not sure what you think you may need to do before changing the battery but let me offer this. Just yesterday, I had to change the battery on my 88. I loosened the bolts on the crossbar above the battery so that I could pull it straight up and out, disconnected the cables, loosened the battery holddown clamp and pulled it out. Dropped in the new battery and bolted everything back up .... Wa La!! and in the infamous words of Willie Nelson ... "On the road again ...." I had no problems in doing this so just go for it!!

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Yeah, GM recommends a 900CCA battery. LOL!

I'm not joking! Ask Sears or GM. I found this to be really cute since I have added a lot of electronics to her since I've bought the 1100CCA or so I now have (one of the DieHards) and haven't had a prob since. Wish that happened with the old battery, before the $100 investment in Sear's stock! mad.gif

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Okay, I've calmed down a bit mad.gif I guess the sad part is that I've tried the cheaper, lower powered 450CCA's and just proved them (GM) right. I hate to be proven wrong! grin.gif

You also should get a good battery for the '90, as it loves to drain 'em if left sitting (no excess drain, just hard on batteries), like a DieHard WeatherHandler. Cold weather and rain's the worst. Also, sulfate eaters are great battery accessories. They are the red and green felt pads you find in the battery section of any auto parts store that go around the terminals of the battery. Remember that you have side mounted terminals and get the right ones for your car. Also, check your terminals. If corroded, replace them. They're cheap. Hope this is what you were looking for.

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The ONLY battery you should be looking at is the Optima.

Here is why you should purchased the Optima battery. From their advertising "One of the other attributes of this battery is its 18-month shelf life. Its unique internal construction keeps it functional even after months of non-use.The long life of the battery benefits both retailers, who can be confident of stocking fresh batteries on their shelves, and seasonal car buffs, who are more likely to let their starting batteries sit unused for months at a time. <span style="font-weight: bold">Optima batteries can sit unused for up to one year and still can start a vehicle. </span> In addition, low internal resistance reduces charge time to as low as 1 hour for a full charge, compared to the 10 to 16 hours required for recharging conventional batteries,? says Randy Hively, product manager. The OPTIMA is ideal for motor boats, farm equipment, collector cars, and other seasonal equipment and Reattas.

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I like that icon laugh.gif ... might have to make it part of my signature somehow!

Anyway, besides all of the marketing hype, from what I've seen of the design specs and what I've heard from the few who use it, yeah, the optima is a good battery, but is it the best or worth the $150+ price tag? I have mixed feelings. Also, you should note that it's operational life, under normal daily use, has been reported to me as considerably shorter than a >$100 battery would be expected to have; about 3yrs typically. And yes, this is from both a marine user AND a collectible driver (DeTamaso Pantera) who use theirs year round. So again, I don't know. If you're storing, probably one of the best your money can buy, if not the best. For daily drivers, especially ones in mixed climatic areas like Baltimore and New York, prob have to say, "Go for the Gold (DieHard) and never get stuck in the Cold" (more marketing crap, LOL).

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Batteries (as we know in everything that uses them) are a disposable commodity. The new jell batteries have some impressive charactistics, but at close to 3 time the price of a conventional battery....they loose their advantage in a normal vehicle. I have no problem buying batteries at WalMart that have a high cranking rating and a 4-5 year warranty.

I am of the opinion that in wet cell batteries (the technology has been around for some time) the main difference is the hype advertised on certain brands.

We all know that advertising cost money and who do you think pays? If you buy a battery at a service station it has about three middle men getting their cut and that does not make the battery any better.

WalMart and other mass merchandicers move a huge amount of inventory and their batteries do not set on the shelf very long. Also, there are maybe 5 companies making car batteries and out of those factories come probabably 100 different brands.

Go for cranking amps, warranty and price

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Wow, I sure "missed the boat" on this question. I looked at it strictly as a matter of physical replacement. I never figured that the question pertained to what TYPE of battery to use. Yeah, I agree that you will need a high rated battery otherwise you will be replacing it again before long. I stopped at Sears for my replacement and they had a hard time finding one on their shelf that would satisfy my Reatta. I eneded up going somewheer else and had no problem at all. Sorry for not understanding what you were really asking.

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If you plan to drive the car regularly, any good battery of the proper size and capacity should do fine. If you plan to drive the car less often, you might consider a battery maintainer, that plugs into a 110 volt outlet and maintains a very slight (I belive only an amp or two) charging rate so that the battery is always fully charged. I have had good luck with these on cars that I do not drive very often. You do need to keep an eye on the water level as the maintainer will tend to boil off the water over a long period of time.

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This is like gasoline: my street cars run on 87. Similarly for batteries I spend under $50 for the 2 year warrentied ones (usually either Penske or Champion - same battery, different label) with 650 CCA. Unless the car has a problem this is Good Enough ©.

Always buy the same one with both top and side terminals and one size fits all from Judge to Fiero. That way can always just trade around.

One difference, my TranSport currently has a 12 month battery sinply because the local K-Mart did not have a replacement when mine died at 23 months. Got $8 back.

Generally I have batteries last anywhere from 3-5 years.

Best deal I every had was a K-Mart "liketime" battry I had in my 72 wagon. Bought new battery in 1975 and kept for 25 years. Routine was always the same - go to K-Mart. They'd check the charging system (which I had done just before so knew was right), mutter, call Troy Mich. mutter some more, give me a new battery.

Also had a JcPenney "lifetime" in m the Sunbird but only had that one for 22 years. Does anyone still have a "lifetime" free replacement warrenty ?

ps for cars not driven much, I have quick disconnects on the batteries.

pps of course I live in Florida smile.gif

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