Terry Wiegand

NEWLY REBUILT ENGINE - BREAK-IN OIL?

Recommended Posts

6 hours ago, Brian_Heil said:


Carb cleaner and dry cleaning fluid are close relatives. Pick your poison. Literally. 

 

Carb cleaner is usually a combo of acetone and toluene. Dry cleaning fluid is not even a hydrocarbon. It's a chlorocarbon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would add an in line thermostat and raise the coolant temp, and oil temp will follow assuming there is not a separate oil cooler.  You need to get the condensation/water out of the oil by having the oil near 212. 

 

My 1923 Buick runs about 160 coolant and 200 oil stabilized on tour in the summer. No thermostat. Fairly typical that oil is ~50 above the coolant in an engine. These other cars must have huge radiators. 
 

Frozen oil pumps.  Common issue back in the old days.  Water lays in the bottom of the pan and freezes locking the pump and breaking the drive mechanism 

 

Did you know a 1923 Buick has a spring loaded friction drive on the oil pump drive shaft from the factory just for this?  The thing slips if frozen and creates heat to melt the ice and then still works once thawed.  Nothing breaks. Pretty smart those Buick Engineers.   No idea what other years have this. 

F1FED159-E6F3-4B8E-929F-56A56E36E09F.png

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’m not a Chemical Engineer but Wikipedia agrees with me at least. 

7D85B150-23E4-4FB1-BFCB-5476DF4FE039.png

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can't use that in dry cleaning anymore, too flammable. They use perc nowadays

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That’s why good dry cleaners are so hard to find.  The good old ones are all dead from the Stoddard Solvent. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From the fires?

 

Stoddard solvent is not toxic, it's just mineral spirits. Same thing. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So Marvel Mystery Oil is just a mixture of hydrocarban molecules  ???

 

If so....there can't be anything very special about it.....

 

Jack Worstell

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, it's been a week and I got quite a few comments about my engine rebuild.  I learned that there are as many opinions as there are comments.  With that said, here is what I am going to do.  I spoke with Dave Mattison at Abrahams Machine Service.  I figured that since they are rebuilding the engine they might have some suggestions.  Had a great visit with Dave and really learned a lot.  First off, I was told that Black Moly Assembly Grease and LubriPlate #105 White Grease should NEVER be used to set an engine together.  The reason being is that both of these products will not dissolve into the engine oil during the initial start-up.  Dave told me that they use a Clevite product for the initial assembly.  They also use and recommend Clevite break in oil for the first 300 - 500 miles on the engine and then I can switch over to the oil of my choice.  I asked him about using Havoline Motor Oil.  His words were, "EXCELLENT CHOICE".  I then asked about the grade to use since we will be running aluminum pistons.  I think everyone knows that the cylinder wall / piston clearance for aluminum pistons is different than for an engine with cast iron pistons.  I asked if 20W50 would be a good oil to use.  Again, his words were, "EXCELLENT CHOICE".  We then talked about the zinc additive in the modern oils.  I knew this, but, he told me anyway, the bearings in modern engines have Babbitt in then.  His opinion of the ZDDP issue is that it is way overblown and that with using the latest 20W50 Havoline oil the engine will run forever with it.  I want to say this very carefully so that there will be no misunderstanding - I AM NOT GOING TO RUN MARVEL MYSTERY OIL IN THE CRANKCASE!  Dave and I had quite a discussion about that.  He told me that when my Dad started driving back in the late 1930's and early 1940's, oils and fuels were way different than what we have today and there could have been some benefit from using it to keep the insides of an engine from getting gummed up.  Totally unnecessary today.  He said that if I was really set on using it, put a little in the gasoline tank with a fill-up.

Dave and Brian Heil both told me that Clevite is a major supplier of bearings to General Motors.  I am very comfortable with my new found knowledge about how to break this engine in properly.  Thanks for all of your comments and encouragement.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think Marvel Mystery Oil will just evaporate. You are talking about something with a boiling point between gasoline and kerosene. Obviously if you put gasoline in the crankcase it will evaporate out after a long run, the same way water does. MMO has a slightly higher boiling point than gasoline so it will take a little longer, but even kerosene will eventually evaporate out the crankcase vent. Hell, the reason motor oil turns black and stops lubricating is the more volatile fractions of the oil evaporate out, so obviously the MMO will be long gone by then. All MMO is, is mineral spirits, the same stuff you clean your paint brushes with. It evaporates like water.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Terry;

  I have rebuilt and poured bearings on several vintage engines, personally I think the best thing you should do is change whatever oil after about 20-30 minutes. At that time it will probably look somewhat metallic. But you will have accomplished 90% of the bearing filing stage. I think the Havoline 20-50 is a good choice. Personally I prefer Rotella 15W-40.

  I'm sure it will be very exciting hearing it rumble back to life!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To make a long story short, in 1994, two PhDs at the Battelle Institute, doing Tribology research for, and funded by, an engine manufacturer, determined that break-in is still essential for long, trouble-free engine life, despite modern manufacturing methods. The manufacturer wanted to build an engine they envisioned could operate continuously for 1,000 hours under full load, at wide open throttle, without failure.

 

They determined that proper break-in required:

 

1) Initially using a lighter weight or viscosity oil than would be used in normal operation, say 30 weight instead of 40 or 20 weight instead of 30;

 

2) Running the engine under light to moderate load at lower RPMs, avoiding higher speed operation;

 

3) Draining-out the first fill of the lighter weight oil at about 25 miles of continuous operation, that is, 12 miles out and 12 miles back, observing point #2 (plus the filter being changed) and while still oil is still hot;

 

4) Refill with the light weight oil, plus install new filter, and then running for about 50-100 miles of operation, observing point #2. Then drain and refill plus another new filter, as in point #3, and drive an additional 250 miles;

 

5) Then drain the lighter weight oil, while still hot, change filter, and put in the oil that the engine will us in normal operation. Then drive normally.

 

The idea was to allow the microscopic asperities that remain on the main and rod bearing journals, left over from the manufacturing operation even after grinding, to gradually break free, and for the bearing material and journals to “mate” or burnish themselves to each other before normal operation began. Until they followed this break-in procedure, the researchers never reached 1,000 hours of severe duty operation.

 

I would also agree with others not to use Marvel Mystery Oil in the crankcase at all, only in the fuel system – and only if you need it down the road.

 

Also, do not “drive it like you stole it” like some wise guys tell you to do.
 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now