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2 hours ago, Jeff Perkins / Mn said:

Steve, Ya got that radio turned on for Clyde?

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Jeff I hope this isn't a jinx, his little mini barn doesn't have electricity yet, but 4 years and no mice, no sign of mice at all.  Rabbits live underneath though!

 

Garage tho all good!  News station!!

Edited by Steve_Mack_CT (see edit history)
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Have a workbench in the basement that the furnace is in as well, so it is toasty warm. I have cleaned up the bench and the room and have piled on the bench a number of projects I want to work on this winter when we will have long periods of cold weather with possible snow and ice conditions outside. I have heat in the garage but do not want to raise any dust/dirt in the air there as it would then land on  my two pre war cars residing there.

On the table what you see is from front to rear : brass top tank for a Mack truck in need of a polish, just behind it is a brass spotlight of somewhat huge proportions ( made in France)also needing a polish , the wood wheel is for a late teens Studebaker and will become a display  on my front porch in nice weather and the bits of plated tin pieces are the trim for a carousel wood motorcycle that was made in England in the late 1940s that I have restored ( brought it home from England about 30 years ago as extra baggage on the airplane) . The brass top tank and the spotlight are really very heavy! not something to hold on ones lap and polish while watching TV at night , would cut off the circulation to my legs.

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Jeff, so far as to the date to the Mack top tank. I can only guess , even after consulting my friend John Montville's excellent history book of Mack truck published in 1974. I would say it is of the 1930-34 era due to the style of the taper at the ends/sides being narrow. I do believe that it was originally plated as the badge that is screwed to the front is chromed, so that would put it in the 1932-34 era but no later. A very substantial piece ! and another treasure I bought from the L.I. Auto museum during an Iron Range Day - found out in the back "Truck barn" up in a shelf against the north wall . One had to be careful when exploring there as raccoons had taken over and used many of the cubby holes parts and stuff were stored in as homes. You did not get on a tall ladder and reach into anything that you couldn't take a quick peak into first to see if someone was staring back at you!

Yes, I have a lot of stories - many I now recall with a " I can't believe I did that and am still here in one piece" . The fun of old cars!

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Thanks Walt......I was curious about the vintage as I know where there are several Mack and Diamond Reo trucks left for dead. They are old dumpers used on the iron range in N. Minnesota. They are a bit newer, likely from the 40’s.

So many car adventures in our lives, both on the road and on the “hunt”.  Yes, it can be quite spooky digging around in those old buildings!

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On 12/13/2020 at 6:32 PM, Walt G said:

Have a workbench in the basement that the furnace is in as well, so it is toasty warm. I have cleaned up the bench and the room and have piled on the bench a number of projects I want to work on this winter when we will have long periods of cold weather with possible snow and ice conditions outside. I have heat in the garage but do not want to raise any dust/dirt in the air there as it would then land on  my two pre war cars residing there.

On the table what you see is from front to rear : brass top tank for a Mack truck in need of a polish, just behind it is a brass spotlight of somewhat huge proportions ( made in France)also needing a polish , the wood wheel is for a late teens Studebaker and will become a display  on my front porch in nice weather and the bits of plated tin pieces are the trim for a carousel wood motorcycle that was made in England in the late 1940s that I have restored ( brought it home from England about 30 years ago as extra baggage on the airplane) . The brass top tank and the spotlight are really very heavy! not something to hold on ones lap and polish while watching TV at night , would cut off the circulation to my legs.

workshop table DEC2020.jpg

I just did the exact same thing; making a sit-down workspace in the furnace room immediately after the installer replaced the old one.  I now have the patio table inside to fabricate some new stainless steel fuel & brake lines for two Studebakers I'm currently working on.

 

Over the past several months, I've been taking in the old fasteners to get cad plated. A 'before' and 'after' photo.

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Up-dating my Grand Nation Award winning 1939 Buick Special 4dr sedan.  The car has dual sidemounts and a full leather interior.  The interior was restored in 1971 and due to age and use the driver's seat had began to show its wear.  We are re-upholstering the front seat and installing a new, correct front floor mat.  The lacquer paint, finished in 1981 after stripping the car to bare metal still looked great from some distance, but had began to fail.  The car was taken to the AACA Sentimental Tour in 2018 in Mississippi. After arriving, it rained for two days.  The car was parked i the hotel parking lot withe the back end under some kind of tree.  There wasn't time to wipe it down before leaving on the tour on Monday morning. Bubbles on the back end, under the tree, turned into dark blue spots that would not compound out.  So, I had the car repainted in the original color again.  This time there is clear on it which will protect the blue paint,at least for the rest of my life.  I'm 82 now and my wife is 81.1640760052_Suzybelleinnewpaint2.jpg.02a637d263b3d69324eeec2370dccaaa.jpg1781947570_Suzybelleinnewpaint1.jpg.7aca8c8f10e2fdee8b49ab363217da41.jpg

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Merry Christmas to all. I’ve been in the wood shop working on a cabinet for my oldest daughter. She wanted a cabinet to use as a pantry since she has very limited cabinet space in the kitchen. The two of us picked the materials this past summer. I just didn’t have time to build it. My wife has told her that with me working so many hours that it would be next year before I could get to it. My plan was to start on it in November, but I started it late. With the help of my other daughter, I finished it this morning by putting the adjustable shelves in. She is going to be really surprised when she sees it later today.

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Today I finished the 1/4 model of the Lombard Log Hauler steering ski assembly. It will serve as a visual aid to the Mechanical Engineering Technology students and hopefully sell some of them on the idea of taking it on as a capstone project. Over the years the museum has worked very closely with the University of Maine, School of Engineering Technology. In 2014 the MET students complete the restoration of our 1907 Steam Lombard log hauler. In addition the Construction Engineering Technology students have done a ton of construction projects for us ranging from buildings to roads. Its a wonderful experience working with the faculty and students.

 

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After 8 years of searching I had sourced correct 22" wheels for my 1925 Buick Standard Touring. The car had been fitted with available 21" wheels. The wheels I purchased were in good solid shape as they still had 3 layers of paint. The original Cobalt blue with gold striping still in evidence. A very light blue. And lastly a cream yellow.

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 Still it took quite a bit of sandblasting, scraping, sanding and prepping to get them into shape. Soaked in wood sealer/prime/sand/repeat...

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To be correct for my car I painted them in Brewster green. All these cars had striping on the felloes and spokes. I used a roller striping tool for the felloes.

I made up a copper stencil formed as to be able to clip on the spoke. Also to keep the spears on center to the axis of each spoke.

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That did not work to well and so I used painters tape and simply used the stencil as a template for an EXACTO blade to remove the cut out spear shape. The results were much better.

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Now to finish up with the exchange of the wheels on the car.

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by dibarlaw
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Yesterday and this morning I performed my service/maintenance and safety inspection on my Model A Ford. I found some interesting things such as a loose sidemount bolt on the frame, loose distributor, corroded ground strap on the frame. Some slight fraying on the fan belt was noted so it was replaced. I think I will rotate the tires for one more season then replace them next winter. All in a days fun but I will be ready to go as soon an the snow disappears next spring.

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I've been playing Lumberjack for the last few days.  A tree came down between the new duck house and the kids play house and miraculously didn't damage anything Christmas eve. I think it actually hit the shed but being I built it like a tank it handled it with no problem as I did note some slightly bugerred up shingles. 

Well since the 21 inches of snow the week before almost completely melted, I figured i would tackle other trees we have been going to take down.  Good exercise and it's nice to work outside doing this type of work when the air is crisp.  

If I hadn't put chains on the tractor I would be chipping as well, but don't want to dig everything up moving the chipper around. 

When the weather turns bad,  I'll get back to the cars in the heated garage. 

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It was a balmy 24 degrees at the museum today (indoors and outdoors). However, this winter has been decidedly hard sledding with no snow even up here in the far north reaches of Maine.

First task was fitting the new radiator cap to the 1928 Lombard dump truck. It could use a bit of patina to get it to match the existing "paint" (I use that word loosely). That will be a job for a warm spring day. (but it matches the cab pretty good!)

 

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Its not in the same league as a gleaming winged goddess but certainly better than a whittled block of wood.

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I handed off the model of the skis to Herb. Here it is compared to the beast the full size set will be installed on. We sprinkling water on the model

to hydrate it to full scale and save a lot of work but................ that was a fail.

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We spent time trying to sort out the green beast. We found that the distributor shaft bushings are well pass their goodness date. The shaft was wobbling around like a grog happy sailor - Needless to say its off to Ken's for rehab. All the extra iron on front is from back in the day it was used for plowing.

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Edited by Terry Harper (see edit history)
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7 minutes ago, JimKB1MCV said:

Watch for the three-point turn.

I don't think I want to Indian-wrestle Terry for the next round of beer...

 

Ha! To say the steering was a bit stiff from the cold would be an understatement! Not to mention trying to breath through the mask! (LOL)

Edited by Terry Harper (see edit history)
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Today, first day of the new year - best wishes to all from down under   😊                                                                                                                                                                                                               Managed two jobs on my 1930 66 Chrysler, got the instrument panel trail fitted, so I made up the wiring required for the dash and finished the wiring from the engine. BTW  made my own wiring harness with correct wire colours and also added an extra fuse holder for turn signal lamps. Also started making trim panels to cover the openings in the floor boards around the pedals, gear stick and handbrake lever.

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A friend of mine is finishing the metal replacement and massaging the roof on my 57 Chevy.  All new floor from toe boards to trunk edge.  Since its a 57 sport sedan, it had the usual rot around the roof where it goes in to the quarter panel.  When I get the car back, all I will have left to do on metal will be to replace the quarter panel skins and the metal lip that goes from the quarter into the door edge (you can see it already missing in the second photo).  I've also massaged my core support for the Chevy and its in its (hopefully) final primer before sealer and paint (satin black)

 

I have also been working on an engine test stand.  I've converted a regular engine stand (its not finished yet) so that I can just unbolt a few items and put the original parts back on and its just an engine stand.  The base is finished, now to make uprights for SB Chevy, SB Ford, big block Ford, and flathead Ford.  I have all of those to rebuild or assemble and run on it.  All of the box tube is 11 gauge 2", the angles are 3/8" x 2" and 3/16" x 3".  

 

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Edited by AURktman
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Yesterday I drove my Model A to my winter storage. There I parked it and started my Model T and drove that back home to my shop for it’s annual safety check and maintenance. A distance of 8 miles one way. This is in Minnesota in January. Never have driven either before in the winter. Roads were dry and clean.

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Well today, I did something I have been putting off for some time now- I cut a big chunk out of some 91 year old metal - who does not love doing that.😀 I removed a previous repair and welded in a patch panel retrieved from a very bugger up guard. Turned out fairly decent for someone learning about welding and panel work from watching  youtube videos.

Cheers Mark

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Slowly working on my garage getting the wiring reconnected which had to be disconnected to put in a new overhead door for access to the back pad and yard.

 

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Need to get the boxes on the other side of the door next and then will have power on that side of the garage again.

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It's a rain day today so will have time I guess...

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Recently I obtained a rough set of top bow sockets from a friend for my 1919 Model T revival. After much repair they were deemed useful enough so I started making the bows. Not pretty but functionally proper and dimensionally correct + strong. Bowdrill  will hide the cosmetic uglies. The top is on order from Classtique, due about the middle of February.

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