Jeff Perkins / Mn

What are you working on right now?

Recommended Posts

On ‎4‎/‎29‎/‎2020 at 8:49 AM, Rob H21. said:

New project for rescoration on my way!!!

d45640es-960.jpg

A Gaz ARO from 1971, or so.

 

Where was it sold new?

 

Craig

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Benefits of AACA Membership.

Posted (edited)

Yesterday being Tuesday meant that the "Tuesday" crew was out and about working on a variety of projects at the Maine Forest & Logging Museum. The "Tuesday Crew" a a group of elderly gentlemen who volunteer every Tuesday to at the museum. They are a wonderful group to work with.

 

There was a a lot going on and it was a magnificent Spring day.

 

Herb and Lew and I got the Fairbanks-Morse 3 hp Model Z running. This was donated to the museum last  Fall. Thanks to Reg Clement (Clement's Starter & Alternator in Carmel, Maine) for bringing the magneto back to life. The engine is setup with a Fairbanks-Morse pump for display. Unfortunately the drive gear on the engine is  cracked so we can't run the pump. Eventually we may set it up with a flat belt.

 

We have wanted to get the water temp. gauge working on the Lombard dump truck. Unfortunately there is no place on the block to screw in the probe so we made a fitting and cut that into the upper radiator hose. It might not be original but with a nearly irreplaceable engine we want to be safe rather than sorry. With the gauge working Herb and I took it for a cruise up the road and back - we got the old girl moving along in fourth gear at a breath taking 5.5 mph. It's aking to riding in a cement mixer with a bunch of nuts and bolts whirring around. It's suppose to top out at 8-10 mph but that would take a far braver and deafer person than me. Anyway, the temp. held solid at 150. The gauges are not original but they all work now and at least match. In additionLew got his beloved Cletrac up and running. It was repowered with a model "A" Ford engine which suits it well.

 

 

We also prepped and test ran the water powered sawmill after its long winter slumber. The Alwife are running in the stream and its an amazing sight!

 

Charlie and Ed had the rotary sawmill up and running so Herb shot a video for the virtual musem project.

 

 

All a good days work!

Edited by Terry Harper (see edit history)
  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/17/2020 at 7:06 AM, Steve_Mack_CT said:

Picking shocks off my Model A shock tree, they are ripe when they present black..


Steve, what type of oil will you use in the shock absorbers?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Jeff Perkins / Mn said:


Steve, what type of oil will you use in the shock absorbers?

Well Jeff, these are US made Bratton delicious which come pre sealed, supposedly for life.  I suspect Stipe makes them as they look machined vs. Stamped, and how many people can be making these things, right?  I hope to be bolting things back up tomorrow and Saturday, and take a shakedown ride sometime this weekend. 🙂

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Steve_Mack_CT said:

Well Jeff, these are US made Bratton delicious which come pre sealed, supposedly for life.  I suspect Stipe makes them as they look machined vs. Stamped, and how many people can be making these things, right?  I hope to be bolting things back up tomorrow and Saturday, and take a shakedown ride sometime this weekend. 🙂


An illustrated road report would fit nicely in this posting......good luck!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

How to get rid of more stuff..

 

I also had to mulch the flower  beds this week..

 

I worked on my son tree.. and gave him a rider mower..

 

I also got a few items for my son...

IMG_6447.PNG

IMG_6448.PNG

IMG_6449.PNG

IMG_6422[26403].PNG

IMG_6424[26405].JPG

IMG_6425[26407].JPG

IMG_6426[26409].JPG

IMG_6427[26421].JPG

IMG_2050[26393].jpeg

IMG_6368[26461].JPG

IMG_6464[26485].JPG

Edited by nick8086 (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Awhile back I fabricated a face plate and knob to make a faux-American Bosch magneto switch out of a modern push/pull switch.

Yesterday I decided to try DIY nickel plating. Using and old battery charger for some electronic device that died a long time ago, nickel strips,

white vinegar and salt.  (I may have learned at least something in 8th grade science!)

 

Anyway, I think it came out half decent. There is a little flaking on one edge of the knob which I think is due to not having it clean enough.

IMG_0605.thumb.JPG.b5a184838c477737f5e33d53981ef772.JPG

 

IMG_0607.thumb.jpg.23fe4b9f39af3e426ed11d4d89639bcc.jpg

 

The other project was plating the surround for the new choke control. Again I had to modify the design to adapt to a modern product but it should work.

and look pretty darn close to the original.

 

The original knob was bakelite. In an effort to replicate it we used Garolite. Chris Rueby turned the knob for us. The Garolite is not an exact match - 

the paper shows through and makes it look more like wood. Eventually I may find something that will match better such as casting a phenolic resin

rod (I can mix the color) and turning it from that.

 

IMG_0609.thumb.JPG.ed3842426cd409267410dccf726ea1e1.JPG

 

 

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Today we installed the new choke knob and surround on the 1928 Lombard dump truck. Looks good and functions perfect.

We find with this beast that you need to be real fast opening the choke.

 

Installed.jpg.84da77534536970592b08aa13b8073fa.jpg

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nothing car related  and frankly quite depressed about the whole situation.

Things keep cropping up that I have no control over but need to be addressed.

At least I can say we are all healthy but... 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, dei said:

Nothing car related  and frankly quite depressed about the whole situation.

Things keep cropping up that I have no control over but need to be addressed.

At least I can say we are all healthy but... 

 

Ya know, without good health we have nothing. “Fires” always seem to pop up in our lives, just have to take care them and move on. Cheer up friend, when you look at the garden see the flowers instead of the weeds!

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’m working on restoring the 11 light fixtures for the front of my ‘51 Brill coach.  Today I installed the parking lights, and what a journey that was!

 

- Just studying old photos to find what parking lights would be accurate took a while.  I finally found a fixture that looks close on eBay, then had to find a clear lens to fit it.  Had to flatten part of the bezel to fit the lens, and cut my own gaskets, but it worked!

 

4902A07A-4E34-46C0-92F1-A116B56F31D3.thumb.jpeg.09728f5b7565669f290c1c49fc329bcf.jpeg

 

- The round holes were just a bit too small for the more accurate fixture I switched to. To cut the aluminum body, I clamped a reciprocating saw blade in a vice and hammered it until it was curved.  Worked pretty well!

 

- I couldn’t solder the wires with my pencil iron, so I cut an aluminum can as a heat shield, and torch soldered both connections.  Hard work, but they’re very solid now.

 

F744FEEF-AA15-4B1C-AC53-1FA51358676A.thumb.jpeg.8795bdf401dd3ace8d0a056f8bc03b00.jpeg

 

So here’s the results: two nice 1950s clear glass parking lights where there used to be ugly 1990s amber plastic lights.  I need to finish other lights before I reinstall the battery and test everything.

 

C9D0FE9A-DA3A-448E-97DE-5C6BA5B394BC.thumb.jpeg.cc9e3f38bda0128cf0d534cabd140020.jpeg

 

9AE19DF2-2ABA-413A-999D-980B7AAB7BC6.thumb.jpeg.2aa014bc06452b432872aaf9234b5dd3.jpeg

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Got more of the lights rust treated and reinstalled, and temporarily put some nice shiny chrome and enamel on her nose.  Lots of work remains, but it’s nice to stand back and stare at a dream steadily coming true!

 

EB585042-281B-403C-B01F-218F3AAE55E4.thumb.jpeg.ba2fc73e9dfc1a5f5ef236cf18b3fdd5.jpeg

 

DB4A25DE-B397-4031-836B-E061804D283B.thumb.jpeg.7712e2627d59d746c1b2e8f6bc8fbcff.jpeg

 

3307B157-6F0E-41A3-8A12-8AC6F25BF363.thumb.jpeg.66422a215cb572c83d648b20ed2ff460.jpeg

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Once again I found myself at the Maine Forest & Logging Museum. It might sound like I live there or at least closeby but thats not quite so.

I live in a small northern Maine town tucked in close to the Canadian border - complete with thousands and thousands of acres of rolling potato and brocolli fields and a growing Amish community. Its a 2-1/2 hour drive one way to the museum.  Todays highlights were a moose just off route 1A south of  Easton,  hard braking for a deer  on I-95 by Island Falls and cautionary reduction of speed for a healthy Black Bear just north of Oakland.

 

Anyway, after dropping off our grandson I headed over to the museum and met-up with Herb. We spent the next three hours hiking  and cutting and clearing blowdowns on the Blue Trail. Next project will be re-building a hiking bridge that collapsed and leveling-up the walkway on the Red Trail.

 

After lunch I set to work to do some annual maintenence on our 1934 10 ton Lombard. This included greasing all the universal joints among other things.

I also spent some more time on the dump truck. I hae lost count of how many grease fittings this beast has! Today I found 23 more! 20 of which are for the road wheels. I found these hidden behind sizeable plugs.

IMG_0632-1.jpg.22ff0e82a59f63e0f050cd209f7aafc8.jpg

 

IMG_0628-1.jpg.011bc0933ab5c788ce241e614f385169.jpg

 

Below is a good view of the drivetrain. Differential, brake and transmission.

IMG_0629-1.jpg.730324f2353a1b62bf689593e77f8a47.jpg

 

Note the size of the universal joints. For comparison the deck on each side is 16" wide.

IMG_0630-1.jpg.a4d98f830c02191d66a26e2899561921.jpg

 

And last... one of the 16 plugs and grease fittings for the road roadwheels on the dump truck.

Actually its more than that since the front roadwheels have double fittings per side.

IMG_0633-1.jpg.eb8e6a0b6ef619d645a8e1f5e985da75.jpg

 

 

 

 

Edited by Terry Harper (see edit history)
  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎6‎/‎7‎/‎2020 at 8:15 PM, Brill_C-37M_Bus said:

Got more of the lights rust treated and reinstalled, and temporarily put some nice shiny chrome and enamel on her nose.  Lots of work remains, but it’s nice to stand back and stare at a dream steadily coming true!

 

EB585042-281B-403C-B01F-218F3AAE55E4.thumb.jpeg.ba2fc73e9dfc1a5f5ef236cf18b3fdd5.jpeg

 

DB4A25DE-B397-4031-836B-E061804D283B.thumb.jpeg.7712e2627d59d746c1b2e8f6bc8fbcff.jpeg

 

 

Is your Brill a highway coach as opposed to a city transit bus?  I note only one front door, with no second rear exit door, and fog lamps which were not normally seen on city transit buses.

 

Where I lived when I rode city transit on a regular basis, there were plenty of Brill buses, gasoline and trolley buses: http://www.barp.ca/photo_index2.html

 

Craig

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mine is an interesting hybrid: a suburban coach built on a city transit body, all a special order for the US Army.  They started with ACF-Brill’s rather lightweight C-31 city bus and specified a larger engine, a spare tire compartment, luggage racks, and more comfortable coach seats.  I only knew she was built by Brill when I got her, everything else I figured out as I worked on the bus.  If you want some more details, this is the historical sign I keep with the bus:

 

3B1A6E02-6C39-4FA9-9FD1-94E144728C9E.thumb.jpeg.24044fb7717c6a6a9fc454671b653697.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
On ‎6‎/‎9‎/‎2020 at 10:08 AM, Brill_C-37M_Bus said:

Mine is an interesting hybrid: a suburban coach built on a city transit body, all a special order for the US Army.  They started with ACF-Brill’s rather lightweight C-31 city bus and specified a larger engine, a spare tire compartment, luggage racks, and more comfortable coach seats.  

Thanks for the information!

 

One thing I learned about passenger coaches, is that there was never one 'fits all' specification for them.  Each batch was basically a 'special order' for the administration that purchased them.  Different transit systems in each city and inter-city coach operators, as well as the various government agencies had their own set of requirements for their buses, and color schemes, seating arrangement/capacity, standee windows, or not, etc.  I first noticed this where the transit buses owned by the city I lived in had more basic two tone vinyl seating, where the county next to it had more comfortable thicker padded cloth seating in their buses when I was able to compare each other's fleet of later 1970's order of GM New Look transit buses.

 

Craig 

Edited by 8E45E (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, 8E45E said:

One thing I learned about passenger coaches, is that there was never one 'fits all' specification for them.  

 

That’s certainly true, but the C-37M model was still an outlier among outliers.  The engine option it has isn’t listed in the Brill C-31 spec booklet, although exceptions seemed to be the rule at ACF-Brill.  Pittsburgh Railways got the same bigger engine in their even smaller 27-foot buses.  Also, the enlarged Evans heat/ventilation setup was unique to the Army coaches.

 

ACF-Brill thought the unique buses they delivered to the Army might catch on with civilians, so they introduced a revised version right after C-37M production ended: the model SU-37.  Sadly, they only built 15 of this new “SU”burban model.

 

 

My bus is getting covered back up for a while, so I won’t have many more updates. I have a lot of small parts like wipers and marker lights to fix.

 

Once the restoration really gets moving again, would anyone object to a separate restoration thread for my bus in this forum?  I find my coach is out of place in most bus forums, since 99% of the content there tends to be heavily modded diesel-powered motorhomes.  I like that folks here care about carburetors, preservation, and restoring all the little details to original condition!

Edited by Brill_C-37M_Bus (see edit history)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Brill_C-37M_Bus said:

 

That’s certainly true, but the C-37M model was still an outlier among outliers.  The engine option it has isn’t listed in the Brill C-31 spec booklet, although exceptions seemed to be the rule at ACF-Brill.  Pittsburgh Railways got the same bigger engine in their even smaller 27-foot buses.  Also, the enlarged Evans heat/ventilation setup was unique to the Army coaches.

 

ACF-Brill thought the unique buses they delivered to the Army might catch on with civilians, so they introduced a revised version right after C-37M production ended: the model SU-37.  Sadly, they only built 15 of this new “SU”burban model.

 

 

My bus is getting covered back up for a while, so I won’t have many more updates. I have a lot of small parts like wipers and marker lights to fix.

 

Once the restoration really gets moving again, would anyone object to a separate restoration thread for my bus in this forum?  I find my coach is out of place in most bus forums, since 99% of the content there tends to be heavily modded diesel-powered motorhomes.  I like that folks here care about carburetors, preservation, and restoring all the little details to original condition!

I certainly would not object, and see absolutely no reason why anyone else should, either.

 

A vintage bus is still an antique road-going vehicle, and has its place among collectors.  Look at the vintage bus scene in England, if one wants to see some real appreciation for old coaches.

 

Craig

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/29/2020 at 10:49 AM, Rob H21. said:

New project for rescoration on my way!!!

d45640es-960.jpg

Nice, don't see many of those around. 

 

I restored a GAZ-69M a number of years ago, surplus out of East Germany that ended up in Florida where I bought it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now