Jeff Perkins / Mn

What are you working on right now?

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Terry.....it’s sad that there are almost no one left to operate a Bridgeport or a surface grinder. The equipment is almost always sold for scrap value today. It’s interesting that a education that teaches working with your hands to become a craftsman is looked down upon......even though a true skilled craftsmen makes twice the earnings of most 4 year college graduates. Every young person today wants a computer job working from home for six figures...........and they are all dependent on others to fix almost anything. Independent people almost no longer exist. Maybe with the new social and economic issues we are currently having, we will again make things and manufacture things in the USA. 

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When I lived in a large metropolitan area finding a capable machine shop willing to do one of and multi operation type work was very difficult.  Now I live in a small town with two great machine shops and an experienced, well equipped engine builder close by.  There is a huge antique boat customer base in my area, so the machine shops maintain there older equipment and are used to one of type work.  It's not inexpensive but I am able to get most things done locally.  Hard chrome, porcelain and any type of plating are all hours away with long turn around times. 

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I am lucky enough to have a son who is a skilled machinist and has worked at the same shop for 20 years. He will make anything within reason for me but, with me owning Fords, there is not much he has to make. 

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More work on the duck coop. Actually took a photo today.  I'm trying to use up scrap lumber so it's taking longer as I have to rip stuff down.  New Curbside service at the lumber yard isn't all it's cracked up to be.  Ordered shingles and drip edge both in green and when I got there with no one to speak to had green shingles and galvanized drip edge.  I was a bit annoyed.  This is why I have so much trouble taking the advice of professionals.  Seems not every but many times in my life when I hired a professional,  they screwed something up and I had to correct them.  I didn't have a cell phone to call them to come out to correct it as they keep locked up in the building.  

Really annoying being I'll be roofing it on Sunday most likely.  The windows came in early though so Maybe I'll side it instead. 

Atleast I get to walk by the Auburn occasionally to get tools. That's as close as I get to working on cars these days. 

 

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Randy.......be sure to get a site plan, property survey, building permit, engineering wet stamp, and environmental impact statement, and a UL listed energy efficiency certification................or you gonna have problems. I’ll help you out and call the building inspector for you Monday so you can keep working on it. Do you have the plans for the footing and slab? 😎

 

PS - send me the check made out to cash for all the permits........I will submit it will all the documentation. Interestingly enough, the fee is the same as my estimated service bill on my one ton dually.

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Checks in the mail.   I was going to send cash but then I couldn't write it off. 

 

I have it all figured out.  No foundation so I'll just move it around if they complain about it.  Besides it's agricultural right?  No permits needed if I can turn the place into a farm.  Infact if those 8 ducks (of which we have no ideas yet as to how many might be females) can produce $15,000 worth of eggs a year we will officially be an agricultural enterprise. ;) 

 

I called the office but they said no one was available.  I take that as a do what you want right? 

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Don't forget to have the ducks sign the Certificate of Occupancy....

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Karen is still painting the house, I finished up the valve seal and engine compartment "fixing up" on the 55 Studebaker, and presently being the clean'r/ prep'r/ scrap'r/ screen remove'r, wash'r, and replace'r for Karen.

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Posted (edited)

Took an hour out of cutting lawns to make a pattern for recovering the dash top of my '58 Buick Special.

With it painted up I bolted the speaker grill back in.

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Taped some old pop can boxes together and laid it on top to trace the dash and then cut off the excess.

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Instead of using cotton material for the actual padding I was able to get a material used for padded dashes from an upholstery place. I placed the pattern over it, traced it out and was able to cut it with regular scissors.

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Putting that aside for now I flipped the dash over and placed the original insulation to be sure I didn't ruin it when removing it for painting the metal top.

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Since it was cool today I'll wait a day or two when it is warmer to glue them down.

Edited by dei (see edit history)
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Today I worked on modeling the components for a set of skis for the Maine Forest & Logging Museum's 10 ton Lombard log hauler.

This particular machine was built in 1934 for the City of Waterville, Maine. Lombard offered both skis and wheels and they could

be readily swapped out. Our machine, as (far as we can tell) never had a set of skis since it was used for roadwork and plowing.

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Back in the day the majority of Lombard tractors were used to haul long trains of sleds over iced roads and that is what we would

like to recreate.The goal is at some point to get it setup with a set for winter events. Unfortunately finding the components just isn't going to happen so we will 

have to resort to fabricating from scratch.


On Saturday I visited a local museum in Ashland, Maine and spent the better part of an afternoon taking photos and measurements.

Its sad to see such a wonderful beast rotting away!

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With photos, sketches and measurements in hand I began creating each component in Solidworks and then creating an assembly.

There is still quite a bit of work to do. Next step is to create the shop drawings as determine the fits and tolerances. Then its another trip

to the museum to verify dimensions and collect any that I missed of may have flubbed the first time. Below are a couple of screen captures.

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Once that's all done I can start thinking about patterns. The cross member I am thinking we can do as a welded assembly. Now we just

need the funds to make it happen!

 

 

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There is a guy in Canada that has a couple of Lombards, and he uses them to haul Cat Trains.               

kingofobsolete.ca

He may be able to help also.

 

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2 hours ago, wyankee said:

There is a guy in Canada that has a couple of Lombards, and he uses them to haul Cat Trains.               

kingofobsolete.ca

He may be able to help also.

 

That would be Joey (aka The King of Obsolete) his two machines are Linn tractors. H.H. Linn worked for Lombard in the early days

before developing his own design and setting up shop in New York. Linn's were very popular with towns and cities for plowing etc.

 

 

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Last night I worked on relaxing.

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Today I'm going to clean up a bit and sort through the wood pile. Found some of it has rotten wood...

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Posted (edited)

Working on getting this old girl back onto the road and back into original configuration... 1961 Mercedes Unimog, Swiss surplus. Its had a few 4wd modifications ( home made bumpers/winch/snorkel) to be removed to get it back to stock. Hope to get the timing chain guides installed today... 

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Edited by Lahti35 (see edit history)
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What a pretty paint job ----  too bad it doesnt function properly ....

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1 hour ago, mdh7475 said:

What a pretty paint job ----  too bad it doesnt function properly ....


 

The story of about 80 percent of the restoration shops in the country...........

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Posted (edited)
On 4/16/2020 at 5:38 PM, Terry Harper said:

 Machine Shop. Whenever I walk into that wonderful room its a feeling  - for a mere mortal like me, akin to daring to lay a finger on the helm wheel of the USS Constitution. How could I possibly dare sully the history and soul of such a relic from the past?

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I pretty much feel the same way when I go into the machine shop at Greenfield Village/ Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, MI.

 

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Edited by Larry Schramm (see edit history)
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Well, no pictures for my post but spent the last two days, in my spare time, doing a full brake job on my tow vehicle, an 08’ Gmc duramax dually 4wd crew cab. It got 4 new rotors, all new pads, plus emergency brake shoes. If we can actually show our cars this year I’ll need it in 100% condition. As strange as this might sound, it was one of the easiest brake jobs done in a long time even though the parts are pretty massive. What I mean by easy was there were no issues other than it being bull work and heavy components. People from the north East will know what I mean by saying a brake job up here can be a ton of problems with badly rusted parts, bolts breaking off, rusted stuck calipers, etc.

      Every single bolt came out fairly easy, all the parts I purchased were correct, and the rotors separated off the hubs without issue. The hardest part of the disassembly was the rear axle seals inner ring staying on the axle tube and needing to be pried off the axle. The worse thing is more the condition of my body today. I also got to use the air over hydraulic press that I bought recently for super cheap money. I’ve never taken HD wheel studs out so easy. My 59 year old body can no longer pull, push, and pick up weight while being in odd positions like it used to. Last night my lower back, legs, and both shoulders kept me up with the aching. It’s not going to get better either as today I had 8 yards of mulch delivered that we need to spread tomorrow as it’s the only day in the next week that will cooperate weather wise.

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I put together a pair of front parking lights tonight.  I got a pair of complete NOS red light fixtures and separate clear lenses, not knowing for sure if they would fit.  With  a slightly thicker home-cut gasket, and just a little gentle hammering to straighten out one curve on the bezels, the new lenses fit perfectly!  So once the front end paint job is complete, every light on the front of my bus will be new except the turn signals.

 

What I started with:

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One done, one in pieces:

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A successful test!

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17 hours ago, chistech said:

Well, no pictures for my post but spent the last two days, in my spare time, doing a full brake job on my tow vehicle, an 08’ Gmc duramax dually 4wd crew cab. It got 4 new rotors, all new pads, plus emergency brake shoes. If we can actually show our cars this year I’ll need it in 100% condition. As strange as this might sound, it was one of the easiest brake jobs done in a long time even though the parts are pretty massive. What I mean by easy was there were no issues other than it being bull work and heavy components. People from the north East will know what I mean by saying a brake job up here can be a ton of problems with badly rusted parts, bolts breaking off, rusted stuck calipers, etc.

 

I remember the first brake job I did on a local car after I moved down from Illinois. I was ready to douse everything with PB and replace brake lines when the fittings broke off but everything came off clean - it was amazing.

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Getting ready to spread 7 1/2 tons of gravel this morning.  Oh yea, what fun.

 

 

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On 4/25/2020 at 2:45 PM, Laughing Coyote said:

Getting ready to spread 7 1/2 tons of gravel this morning.  Oh yea, what fun.

 

 

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Hmm. I'm getting ready to plant a bunch of grass where the yard was torn up for driveway  and water line installation. At least when the gravel is moved, you're done!😁

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While sheltering at home I have been putting the finishing touches on the engine for my 1934 Plymouth PE Coupe. I am hoping to get it back in the car and running soon. The engine has been bored 30 over with all new internal parts. While I am at it I decided to repaint the cowl and frame. It will never be easier than now.

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On 4/25/2020 at 2:45 PM, Laughing Coyote said:

Getting ready to spread 7 1/2 tons of gravel this morning.  Oh yea, what fun.

 

 

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Well you don't have to mow it.  and it's pretty fire resistant. 

Then again the only place i can get grass to grow up here is in the gravel driveway.  It won't grow in the lawn where it's suppose to,  no matter how much I fertilize and reseed it.  even put down a whole new layer of top soil.  Didn't make a bit of difference. 

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