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16 hours ago, Steve_Mack_CT said:

 

We have a nice original steering wheel, I need to clean that up as well, no cracks, but I need to figure out how to bring the finish back.

 

Wet sand it with some 2000 (perhaps start with something more course if really needed - no picking on spots though) and/or OOOO steel wool and oil on it or polishing compound (unless polishing compound makes it look bad and then best to stay away from white colored compounds). 

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Thanks John, the better of the two is not rough so that may be a good approach.  I will fish through my detail supplies and I get avoiding white compounds, a constant since our cars are ususlly dark.. 🙂

 

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Plastics usually used in wheels are pretty soft when compared to alot of paints,  that's why you can usually get away with coarser grits.  Hard to say without having it in my hands.

On another note is the 31 Auburn wheel suppose to be a smooth or somewhat rough finish?  The horn button has the same rough finish , that's the only reason I was wondering.   If it's suppose to be smooth I'll polish it.  If not I'll leave it alone. 

 

Mothers isn't too bad for leaving residue if you thuroughly polish it.  I have often used it on dark finishes with no problem. 

Edited by auburnseeker (see edit history)
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  • 2 weeks later...

I managed to get my regained dash and repaired steering wheel and column back in the 39 Packard S-8 along with the somewhat refurbished dash plastic. 

Even though the repairs to the Tenite plastic show, I was able take out most of the warping and some of the distortion and maintain the original pieces.

Its a comfortable 50 deg. F. in Southern Maine with most of our snow gone and with an inch of rain yesterday  I felt confident the salt was washed off the roads.  It was road test time and amazingly everything went very well. A short  45 miles or so on the back roads, filled up with fresh fuel and back into the garage. I suspect winter isn't over yet.

The garnish moldings and the door trim are yet to be grained,  hope to get started on that job soon. 

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On 2/17/2020 at 4:39 AM, Jeff Perkins / Mn said:

As everyone here who has purchased any old car the loving hands of time have touched them all. I bought a Model T years ago that did not have one, not even one cotter pin installed anywhere visible! I think I checked bolts, nuts and installed over 40 pins. 
The more you dig into these cars...........

 

In many instances sometimes it's scary to learn what others have done, or not done to these old cars. Digging in we find so many questionable, or downright stupid decisions that were made to repair these old cars. I guess at the time, someone thought it was a good idea. The more I learn the less risks I'll take. I have personally seen people find a vintage car that was stored in a garage for decades. Do the bare minimum to get it driving, and then take it 100 miles on the hi-way to a car show. So excited to get out there and use the car. 60 year old tires blowing out. Brake fluid oozing from rusty wheel cylinders. Carbs dripping raw fuel. Bearings? Who knows, who cares? It runs right? Makes me shudder. 

 

Maybe this too is what is so rewarding about taking an old car and making right again. So satisfying.

Edited by keithb7 (see edit history)
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Just finished a Faux American-Bosch magneto switch face plate. The vehicle this is going into

originally had a American-Bosch switch. However, years ago when the motor was swapped out

they changed it to a distributor and modern key ignition. This will adapt to it and give it somewhat of an original

appearance. and provide a use for those screw holes in the dash panel.

 

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On another note my students successfully ran all the CNC setups for the Vesta headlight hinges.  They used 

machinable wax for this run. Next will be for keeps in brass. They are working on the fixtures for the 

latch at the moment. They have been 3D printing the fixtures which has worked very well.

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And... today I went into school to get the CNC Laser cutter/engraver setup in the lab. My students are really 

excited about this.

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Lets see:

1.  I've been working on a finger bucket for my tractor to help me with removing a bunch of bigger rocks so I can help save the old back. 

2.  Almost done with a new water softener shed to keep it from frying in the sun. Few little things left to do.

3. Pulled out the Mercury and ran the engine and started to polish some of the stainless trim parts.

4. Trying not to get the corona crud.

 

 

 

 

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Been working on the chassis of my ALF wannabe Fire Chief's car.  I have a thread here under Grandpa's Car.  Finally got the front wheels mounted and the chassis reversed in my 12 x 20 garage so I can hang the rear.  Carry the rear around from the back of the garage today where I had painted it.  Should say carried and used a dolly but it was a bear to do by myself.  Tomorrow I start putting all the pieces on the rear and hope to hang it this week.

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Right now I am changing out the only thing left that I haven't changed on our little 63 Mini trying to get it to run properly again.......  The gas tank  .....  Looked down in it a day or two ago and the little filter on the end of the fuel line inside the tank was (all except about 10% of it) covered with "stuff".. No wonder the little guy seemed like it was running out of gas, it was !  And no, haven't been changing for the sake of changing, been a very deliberate plan to replace faulty or worn fuel and electrical "things" one at a time and note what differences it made. We have had it since 87 or 88 and just didn't do enough maintenance.  Hate to take things apart that are working good, but it finally caught up with me and quit working so good, so I'm gettin' there one item at a time !  If this doesn't get the little guy smoothed the rest of the way out, I may see if it can swim , ha !

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Almost forgot this "working on" item.  My wife's 08 Miata needed plugs and an air filter she said, so I did that and checked everything else that was called out for the 100 K mile check.  Anybody know these little cars had FOMOCO plugs and a FOMOCO automatic tranny ?   No wonder it's been so trouble free !    ( argument starter, ha !)

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Just used our new CNC Laser cutter/engraver to cut some lifter guide and intake manifold gaskets for the big Wisconsin T-head as well

as a radiator cover gasket for the 1928 Lombard dump truck.

 

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I was going to install a new radiator in my Model T. As soon as the hood and old radiator were removed I took one look at the motor and ugh, it needed a painting pretty badly. So, there it is. Now I have to coat the intake/exhaust manifolds with high heat paint and reassemble. Should be on the road Sunday (while I still can!).

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1 hour ago, dalef62 said:

Pulling out the engine on my 1951 Crosley wagon.  Low compression on two cylinders.

 

 

I helped my friend Bud pull many a Crosley motor years ago......maybe I should say we lifted them out!

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Trying to score some hand sanitizer and toilet paper from the supermarket while wearing my Tyvek coveralls and 3M full face spray paint respirator.... and I don't even stand out.

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More work on the museum's 1928 Lombard Dump truck. After opening up the boiler of our

19 ton steam Lombard to prepare for its annual boiler inspection (when the State gets back business) Herb and I

set to work on the dump truck.

 

First order of business was installing our faux-American-Bosch magneto switch. Since we couldn't find (afford) an original switch

which was a rotary switch with the knob being a key, We adapted a modern push/pull switch.  Awhile ago I had milled

out and etched the face plate and knob. Just like the original the knob has the etched image of the Bosch Red Devil (got to love

CNC technology!)

 

Next. we re-routed the throttle cable. It was occupying the hole originally occupied by the light switch. With that out of the way we

installed the new switch. This is a copy of the original and was made by Chris Rueby. Now the dash panel is complete!

 

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With the switch in place we set about wiring-up the lights. Once that job was complete we of course had to take it out for a spin. Now we need a nice period 

tail light and we can head over to cruise night at the Burger Boy......  at 8 MPH in fourth.

 

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Next on the list is to fabricate new doors, a tool box and remodel the cab back to its original appearance. Included in the make-over

will be louvered side panels. (the originals vanished eons ago)  Since having louvers punched is not an option

we are cutting a set out of a pair of hood panels that probably belonged to a long extinct truck and welding them into new panels.

 

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All good fun right?

 

Best regards,

Terry

 

 

 

 

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Posted (edited)
11 hours ago, 29hupp said:

Have the engine running now but not yet driven.  Lots of body work to still do ugg.


I have a neighbor who is slowly restoring a ‘30 Hupp. He is replacing wood and aligning doors etc. A tedious job but he enjoys it. Good luck with yours!

Edited by Jeff Perkins / Mn (see edit history)
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Took some time today to change out a flat (bad old) tire.

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Working in tight quarters with a none running car is always fun but hey,

have nothing but time right now...

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With that done decided with the mild temperature to clean up some branches.

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10 hours ago, dei said:

Took some time today to change out a flat (bad old) tire.

 

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Hi Doug, is your Limited a US or Canadian made car? Interested in identifying that knight's head emblem on the quarter, thanks

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To my knowledge Don all Limiteds were made in Flint. With only 1026 of the 2 door hdtp's made I can't imagine it worth Buick's while to produce them at another plant in the US let alone Canada.

The vin # verifies both mine were made in Flint as is my Special convertible too.

 

Likewise the knight's head chevron is specific to the Limited models but not clear as to it's significance with Buick. Maybe someone has an answer to this?

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Not doing much work these days, trying get my cars out for weekly drives to keep them limbered up. I may start some work on my 34 Chev and will share on my thread. I was thinking about starting a thread here for my 66 Monaco wagon. I already shared my A/C conversion on the Technical forum. If I start a thread here it would be for preservation stuff rather than restoration, would there be any interest?

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3 minutes ago, TexRiv_63 said:

Not doing much work these days, trying get my cars out for weekly drives to keep them limbered up. I may start some work on my 34 Chev and will share on my thread. I was thinking about starting a thread here for my 66 Monaco wagon. I already shared my A/C conversion on the Technical forum. If I start a thread here it would be for preservation stuff rather than restoration, would there be any interest?

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I would love to follow your work on this car. It looks like a great 60s wagon.

 

Kevin

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Today I went to use the vacuum and when I went to turn the lever to disengage the belt so I could remove the brush head of course it broke.  So off to the shop to make a new one, out of aluminum. I cut it out on the CNC mini mill and then to the big mill to do the final machine work.  Then after some final tweaking and clean up I got it all mounted and ready to go.  I hoping by Sunday I can start working on the car again.  It suppose to be 37 degrees in the morning. WTH. I thought it was spring.

 

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Not doing much work these days, trying get my cars out for weekly drives to keep them limbered up. I may start some work on my 34 Chev and will share on my thread. I was thinking about starting a thread here for my 66 Monaco wagon. I already shared my A/C conversion on the Technical forum. If I start a thread here it would be for preservation stuff rather than restoration, would there be any interest?”


absolutly YES!!

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Not getting much done,  but pecking away at it.  I pretty much finished polishing out Victoria and now shifted to the Dodge Roadster.  Wet sanding and buffing it all. Had some orange peel and alot of scratches in the finish. The Hood and Cowl are done.  Trunk lid is just about finished as are part of the 1/4 panels.  Of course I jump off that and keep working on sanding , staining and varnishing trim for the old garage. I got all the casings done,  now just doing the jambs.  I'm trying to work outside on nice days to enjoy the good weather and jump back in the garage on cloudy wet days. 

Getting ready to put a rubber / Weatherstrip order in for the Dodge and Auburn to replace the missing and tired pieces on both. 

I'll have to jump into the brakes on the dodge soon and get the new White walls mounted.  I'm assuming it's going to need all new cylinders.  I can't imagine they did it all in Silicone when they did it 15 years ago. 

Lots of little things to fix on that that were never done quite right.  Seems alot of the "restored " cars I have bought have the same issues and many seem so simple.  

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Finished up the "1963 Mini-Fix" yesterday, but had to ask a Proper Englishman over to bring his knowledge and also his "Color-Tune" device for final tweeking. I've changed a lot of worn parts on the little car, and finally satisfied with it to get it back to normal use.  Had it since 87 or 88, so kinda' like the little thing. Put it back in the shed, put the 55 Studebaker back in the garage, and working up the courage to start changing the valve seals on it.  Sure hate to tear apart something that works so perfectly, ha !

Edited by John Byrd (see edit history)
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