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After 5 decades I finally put heat in the garage to mainly keep the 30 Packard and 40 Buick in there warm enough to not see the lacquer crack and also keep the moisture out. This allowed me to set up an area to start and clean and polish the radiator and shell for a 1916-1918 Locomobile that I bought from my buddy Austin Clark 40 years ago. Before the winter set in I blew all the dust and mice nests out of the radiator/shell ( 80 lbs of compressed air works wonders) and started to polish the shell which still has most of the original nickel plating in great condition but has tarnished since it was removed from a car prior to WWII. Gave up the polishing for some weeks as my arms got tired of the slow polishing process.

The radiator lacked a cap, I wanted a cap to prevent any further rodents from residing in the top tank if they were passing by so with the kind generosity of a great guy in Ohio ( thank you Bob G.!!!! I owe you one, MOST APPRECIATED) I received a cap that I have been working on to get it working and here are the photos. I used JB Weld to secure the cracks then sanded, primed and painted with One Shot Sign lettering enamel. I also restored a motometer of unknown maker, and added the winged doo dad cause I liked it and that was sitting here for decades. The hole in the center of the cap was already there I did not drill that.

Back to doing more research and writing before some people I promised some stories to get mad at me. To many stories never told with all the period information, photographs, literature, periodicals etc sitting in my library/study area.

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Will be finishing up cleaning out personal things in my '52 Ford F-1 in preparation to transport to a new owner.

With the sale of the property there will be no room at the Inn so she had to go otherwise would be sitting outside. (Not what I wanted to do to her...)

 

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4 hours ago, 28 Chrysler said:

Walt G

I have seen one other of this type, it was out of the UK.

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I wish the glass and rim on the one I have had the lettering like in the one in the photo you supplied. but there is nothing anyplace.

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Two years ago to the day, I had taken my Pierce to it’s first car show and when I got home I backed it into the garage so I could do a quick valve job... that snowballed. Today I was finally able to get the radiator, hood, and lights back on so it actually looks like a Pierce again! Still doing several little things but I hopefully will be able to drive it again this month!

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4 hours ago, Walt G said:

I wish the glass and rim on the one I have had the lettering like in the one in the photo you supplied. but there is nothing anyplace.

You could have the glass etched. I could send you better photos.

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Had to get the spare engine that went with the sale of my '52 Ford truck ready to be picked up.

That flat head has some weight to it and watched the Ranger truck the new owner drove squat a bit when lowering it onto the tire.

 

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Edited by dei (see edit history)
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Since I finished the disc brakes on the 55 Studebaker, the new window motor on the 07 Mini, Karen came up with a new idea..."hey, I need a new fancy pants stereo that does everything except use the bathroom for me put in my Mini"...sheesh. Oh well, got that done and the darn thing worked 1st time ! We do, however need a small, pre-teen child to tell us ...well, her, I  ain't fooling with it.... how to operate all the functions. Then, after having such good luck with that, I decided to put the little plastic louvre looking "design feature" back in it's hole it fell out of beneath where there used to be proper bumpers on real cars. That only involved a small amount of blood, an hour, removing the left front wheel and the inner fender well, breaking those mysterious un-available plastic tabs, and then two aspirin.  She says next "SHE" is going to fix a couple of ripped seams in the convertible top... "SHE", get it ?....  Wonder when I'll have to start ordering my new sewing equipment ?  For my next act, I'm putting the Studebakers battery in the trunk, ( hopefully can get another Optima like I've had in a couple other cars ) and getting another new battery and cables for our REAL Mini, ( the 63 ) ...with good ole' reliable positive ground.  Hey, if ya' can't afford to go fast or look good, piddle with little stuff, right ?

 

Sure am enjoying all the stories folks, please keep it up, and I promise not to talk about all the leaves, rocks, weeds, limbs, and 4 piles of mulch from trees we cut down that we have to move before the rock wall builders get here, ha !

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Continuing with moving the collection home.

Moving, sorting parts and discarding things not going to be used is a major play to make room...

 

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Always a bit more work when they aren't running.

Two down, one more to go (or is that come here)....

 

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12 hours ago, Jeff Perkins / Mn said:

Having watched a skilled woodworker rebuild the tail gate on my 1948 Packard, I can really appreciate the amount of work involved in this rear door. Congratulations on a fine effort!

Thanks Jeff. I replaced the wood in the cab of a 34 Packard a few years ago. Quite a bit different than your 48 but similar to this door in that it was a wood framed body with hand formed aluminum over it. Actually more difficult to do than an uncovered wood part. When this door was originally built the sheet metal was installed over a fully assembled wood frame and crimped around the edges, covering most of the fasteners holding the wood together. In order to rebuild it without completely seperating the sheet metal parts I had to build it a little differently than it was done originally.

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A quick Saturday afternoon time filler. I needed some armrest/door pulls for a semi-custom thing I'm doing and couldn't find anything I liked. My first attempt was similar to these but with a padded upholstered top. I couldn't get the leather to take the shape of the part (maybe because i'm not an upholsterer?) so gave up and settled on these instead. Still need to be made shiny.

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Working on a few Ford flathead fuel pumps I purchased from a fellow member. 4 were used pumps and one was a partial NOS new pump.  I cleaned the glass bowls up, 3 OEM AC glass and one that I presume to be aftermarket.  

 

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                                         Original AC bowl                                                                                                       Aftermarket

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I want to finally get my bus ready to drive, at least locally (being ready for longer trips will take even more time and money!).  So I’m starting with some electrical troubleshooting.  The wiring diagram for a ‘51 Brill C-37M is incredibly simple compared to the electric streetcar diagrams I’d learned from before, but I’m guessing it’s still big compared to car diagrams of the ‘50s.

 

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I have persistent shorts in the gauges, so I pulled the panel out to bench-test it.

 

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While testing the wires leading to the gauge panel, the old temp gauge sending unit broke just from loosening the nut on top, so I swapped it out with one I fortunately had in my spare parts stash.  The new one is on the left.  I still need to find the missing wire to the other sending unit, which powers a high temp warning light and alarm bell.

 

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Overall, this was the best day of wrenching on the bus since summer 2019.  Not to discount all the paint workdays of 2020, but this felt great to be making progress again!

 

-Steven

 

 

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I had an idea to jazz up my oil changing rack that holds my waste oil cans, drip trays and pan. I had some left over tubing from the big storage rack so I raised the oil rack up so the jack stands can go under it and be out of the way. Added a big panel and added some holders and shelves for all my oil changing stuff. Still need to add a shelf for a box of rubber gloves and something to hold a light. 

 

 

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Edited by Laughing Coyote (see edit history)
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I am moving my battery from the left hand front (over the power steering unit) to the right rear in the trunk in our 55 Studebaker coupe. Hey look, there are two more spark plugs under where all that mess has been, and the car was yellow from the factory, ha !

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On 3/16/2021 at 8:25 PM, Laughing Coyote said:

I had an idea to jazz up my oil changing rack that holds my waste oil cans, drip trays and pan. I had some left over tubing from the big storage rack so I raised the oil rack up so the jack stands can go under it and be out of the way. Added a big panel and added some holders and shelves for all my oil changing stuff. Still need to add a shelf for a box of rubber gloves and something to hold a light.

 

That’s a very neat setup!  I’m about to move and have a couple options of how to set up my new workspace, so seeing your work is very motivating.


For now I’m working on my brain... cramming in as much Bendix-Westinghouse air brake hardware knowledge as I can find.  It really feels good to reach the point where learning about one system (say, air door valves) makes me realize new things about the other systems (like electrical).  It takes a while, but it’s all starting to come together!

 

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Bought our 57 Ford Thunderbird this past Fall .... have done quite a bit to improve it's road worthiness ... the previous owner had it sitting for over 14 years with almost no driving miles put on it.  So far, I've had to do the following:

  • Rebuild the generator
  • Complete ignition tune up (plugs, wires, electronic ignition (Pertronics), coil, resistor)
  • Holley Carb rebuild and tuneup
  • Replaced vacuum hoses
  • Replaced radiator hoses
  • Replaced hardtop gaskets and moldings
  • Replaced entire exhaust system with stainless factory system, minus resonators
  • Rebuilt Power Brake Booster
  • Flushed and bled brake lines
  • Installed 4 new Diamondback White Whitewall tires
  • Replaced aftermarket cassette radio with modern "Town and Country" radio (bluetooth, AM/FM, RCA Jacks)
  • Replaced dash speaker with stereo speaker

Next up:

  • Replace seat foam 
  • Potentially replace seat covers
  • Remove Continental Tire Kit and return rear to 57 style
  • Repair small dent in rear quarter panel

This is one awesome looking TBird .... I have the original Ford Factory Invoice .. sold new for $3,232.96.

 

Looking for to sharing more info and learning more from other members.

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Worked on the front seat of my 30 Chrysler 66 today.

Firstly I cut out and attached a galvanised sheet metal piece to the back of the seat assembly, also fitted the metal braces for the wood joints, Still have to make and fit the curved side metal pieces, but that is a job for another day.☺️

Cheers Mark

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Two hours of soldering with my buddy the electrical engineer and the selection switch is back on our Cord.  I've turned a 2 or 3 day project into exactly one year.

 

The next step is to get the switch back in to the switch arm that hangs off the column.

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First day of Spring! It was sunny and up in the high 40's at the Maine Forest & Logging Museum.  What better weather to do a demo on scaling logs with a vintage walking wheel log caliper. This one was made by Valentine Fabian sometime after 1900. It took a bit to figure out how to read it and we have no idea which of the dozens of log rules it is calibrated for. Great piece of history and a fun day.

 

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It took me two hours,  but I got the selection switch mounted inside of the switch housing on our Cord.   You may wonder why that would take two hours.  You got to give it a try to understand.   Next step is checking each gear position for continuity.  I have not run the other end of the harness and it reaches all the way back in to the driver seat which will make things convenient.

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The countdown to starting my bus’s engine has started, and the plan is to fire her up this Saturday.  In prep for that, my dad helped me fill and bleed the loooong hydraulic clutch line, then my wife worked the brake pedal while I inspected the air brake chambers for travel distance and smooth operation.  I have a small air leak at the gauge to fix, but otherwise everything looks as good or better than last time the bus ran, in October 2019.  Wish us luck!


The photo shows the shiny rebuilt clutch slave cylinder (thanks, White Post Restorations!) now full of fluid, and the big battery slooowly charging back to full.

 

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-Steven

 

 

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Some projects seem so easy.......... then they blow up on you. One such task is restoring the cab of the 1928 Lombard dump truck back to its original configuration. With the new doors and hardware fabricated and on hand we thought that it would progress nicely. With that in mind Herb and I tried to preliminary fit up the doors to the openings........ That's when reality came over and smacked us up side the head... and we are not talking a playful love tap either.

 

The cab is a rugged affair framed out in welded steel angle. The wood pieces are simply bolted to it with carriage bolts which makes the back-dating process fairly easy. What we didn't count on is that at some point the cab frame (and door openings) was pushed into a parallelogram. The door posts are parallel but not perpendicular to the sill or top. How bad is it? well... if we hold the door to the post we have about 3/4" vertical difference from one end of the sill to the other. Needless to say, cutting the bottom of the door to fit would be rather obvious - likewise adjusting the sill.

 

We thought about trying to bend it all back but....... than we run into issues with the dump body which isn't quite right either. (not quite square on the frame).

 

Now its time to retrench.......

 

 

 

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The goal

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Here you can see the steel angle framework. The button on the gear shift - believe it or not we have not figured out why it is there. rather than pulling up (like a two speed rear-end) and springing back down the button pushes down against a spring (most inconvenient).  With all that is crammed beneath the cab I would need to lift the floor boards to figure out if its even hitched to anything. I will get curious enough at some point to do that!

 

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On 3/7/2021 at 8:41 AM, NewOldWood said:

A quick Saturday afternoon time filler. I needed some armrest/door pulls for a semi-custom thing I'm doing and couldn't find anything I liked. My first attempt was similar to these but with a padded upholstered top. I couldn't get the leather to take the shape of the part (maybe because i'm not an upholsterer?) so gave up and settled on these instead. Still need to be made shiny.

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Sprayed a couple coats of clear on these and finally getting them installed.

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More work on the front seat of my Chrysler 66 tourer today.[ well really the last 2 weeks off and on😁]

The original seat runners unfortunately were beyond saving, so I made new ones using the old ones for patterns. I cheated a little and used bearings to replace the original rollers. If this works out I will turn up some rollers at work [no lathe at home] Also made new seat slides and fitted them to the underside of the seat frame and finally fitted the original seat adjuster lever assembly. Excited about trial fitting the seat and if it works ok will seal the timber and spray on some flat black paint.

Cheers Mark

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After two years and a few weeks I finally got the old gal running... still working on some kinks, which may include a visit to a reputable radiator shop (post shutdown coolant barfing) but it is good to see her move again!

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33 minutes ago, Mark Wetherbee said:

After two years and a few weeks I finally got the old gal running... still working on some kinks, which may include a visit to a reputable radiator shop (post shutdown coolant barfing) but it is good to see her move again!

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No photos under hood? 😎

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30 minutes ago, edinmass said:

 

No photos under hood? 😎


Well, it’s called “unrestored grunge”

 

If only the machine shop could have magnafluxed without cleaning the head, you might not have thought I’d been inside...

 

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Edited by Mark Wetherbee (see edit history)
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