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opinions on the California duster


Hemi Joel
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Hi, I have been using a California duster for many years. I always make sure that there is a good coat of wax or glaze on the car, so I didn't think it was doing any damage to the paint, but I'm not as observant as some people either. The reason for starting this topic and seeking opinions, is that I was at a show last year and started dusting off the car. A guy came up to me almost in a panic, he was adamant that the California duster would damage the paint. He had some supporting information from an expert or an article or something like that. I thanked him for the concern but I told him I had been using a California duster for a long time and didn't notice any damage. He was not too happy that I didn't heed his advice.What do all of you people think of this practice of dusting the car?

 

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Dusting?  I drive a 90 year old Barn-Find.  Whats 'dusting'?  

 

Seriously though, I did use a similar duster a long time ago on my 1940 Cad with a super nice paint job.  It sometimes left 'something' on the paint, like a streak of some sort.  I stopped using it because I wasn't sure where this was headed.  I sold the car, so I cant testify as to the lasting affects.

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I still use one I don’t see any problem.  I guess it could trap dirt if it falls on the ground but I’ve always been careful to avoid that.  The quick detail spray and a soft cotton cloth cut from an old bedsheet works pretty good for me, but some know it all might be disappointed that I don’t have the expensive “micro fibre” cloth.  You can’t please everyone.

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I have many of them and use them all the time.  Best thing I have ever found.  If the duster is going to scratch it,  anything else you touch it with will as well.  I clean heavy shop dust off my cars all the time and some have recently been cut and buffed.  Under flourescent lights I have never seen a scratch from one.  I also use mine out in he big shop to dust my regular truck off after it's sat a few weeks so I can see out the windows after ripping lumber on the table saw and the dust a dirt floor generates. If you like it,  keep using it. 

 

I just finished cutting and buffing this and it will get a duster treatment first time it's necessary. 

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Edited by auburnseeker (see edit history)
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What Auburnseeker says.  Great around dash area also.  They say the older ones get better but I am not sure about that.  I never use on rough or ratty finishes, only possible way I could see any potential damage would be from picking up some nasty debris with the duster from a really dirty or rough surface..

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We have about 10 of them scattered throughout the shop for dusting the cars in the showroom. Never any issues with damage or scratching, although sometimes they leave some streaks if someone isn't careful about what they're wiping. They don't like to get wet and definitely DO NOT WASH IT--that ruins it. The best ones are those that have been used for a while but we do replace them occasionally when they seem to load up and just push the dust around rather than grabbing it.

 

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2 hours ago, jan arnett (2) said:

Keep it in a bag.

 

X 2 on that and don't use it to wipe down a wet car.

I use it on the Buick and the Chrysler all the time, mostly at shows to knock off the dust.

Just remember to shake it out often, and like Matt says, never wash it !!!

 

Mike in Colorado

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4 hours ago, Restorer32 said:

Dust is a preservative.

So is bird poop, cat urine, and mouse poop. 

 

11 hours ago, Real Steel said:

It sometimes left 'something' on the paint, like a streak of some sort.

When they are new they have a light oily substance that is on them so it can pick up the dust.  The more you use it the less it will streak. Have one that is more than 10 years old and doesn't streak.   It's like how a K&N filter has oil on it to catch the dirt.

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 Stopped using mine a long time ago because it just pushes the dust to a edge, like the sharp edge of a fender where it meets the hood-it just leaves the dust at the edge. Really forget about using one when there is a lot of static electricity like in Santa Anna conditions on the west coast or those dry conditions in Arizona.

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Have no experience with this type of duster, but here are a couple things that can be done to keep dust down while cars are in storage.

- Keep a HEPA filter running in your storage space. They're affordable, at least for most people who can afford to have collector cars. If you also work on cars in your storage space, they're good for removing the dust in the air after doing such things as tearing out dirty old auto carpets or vinyl tops. A big plus is that HEPA filtration supposedly is good enough to remove asbestos fibers from the air...something that not enough car restorers/refurbishers worry about, in my opinion.

 

- If you are tearing out old carpets of fabric in your storage space, wet down the old material with a spray bottle first. Aside from keeping dust down, this also can keep the small amount of asbestos fibers that may (or may not) be in the material from becoming airborne.

 

- I drive my cars at highway speeds before dusting them off or wiping them down (though they're only drivers and dust isn't a big concern.)  This removes the majority of dust.

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I have one, and my car too is totally black.  It lifts the dust off the surface quite well IMHO.  I do shake the duster brush out before/after each use.  Do not know if doing so has any real, as opposed to perceived, effect, but it is what I do.

 

Very pleased with mine!  Been using it for 15 years now.

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I just drive the GTO a bit faster and the dust blows away like magic. 

 

Seriously though, I've got a couple of them in the shop and like them, especially the small sized one that I use for dusting the Model T (v-e-r-y black), and getting into the tight corners on the MGTC.  Reminds me of an older product that worked in a similar way - believe it was called KOZAK.  It used to be advertised prolifically in HMN and other hobby mags.  "...never needs washing, the dirtier it gets the better it works..."   I know of one particular club member who has a very nicely restored 1914 Model T that has been shown extensively over the years, and that's all he's ever used to keep it clean.  The car looks like it was freshly restored.

What ever became of those polishing cloths?

Terry

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Gave up the duster over 15 years ago and only use KOZAK wipes which I believe was founded in 1923 in Chicago. Last time I bought them Pep Boys was selling them. Unsure who purchased the company a while back but they are still available. No scratches and leaves a clean shiny finish.

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5 hours ago, Laughing Coyote said:

So is bird poop, cat urine, and mouse poop. 

 

Actually, poop and urine are all detrimental to paint.

Dust does preserve paint.  It blocks the suns UV rays.  but if it gets wet, it holds the moisture onto the paint longer which, of course, is not so good.

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Before getting the california Dusters which reside in just about every one of our collectibles,

back in the late '50s or early '60s, one of my cars came with another product which I believe was called Nenette, or something similar,

and worked like the duster, but was retained in a metal cylinder when not in use. It also had some treatment to be used in the storage cylinder.

 

Does anyone recall this product?

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4 hours ago, Marty Roth said:

back in the late '50s or early '60s, one of my cars came with another product which I believe was called Nenette, or something similar,

and worked like the duster, but was retained in a metal cylinder when not in use. It also had some treatment to be used in the storage cylinder.

GM in Canada at least, sold the Nenette duster in the 50's, 60's and 70's.  Some years it was sold as Nenette and some years it was in the accessory book with a GM label.  We also sold the treatment for it.

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14 hours ago, Tinindian said:

GM in Canada at least, sold the Nenette duster in the 50's, 60's and 70's.  Some years it was sold as Nenette and some years it was in the accessory book with a GM label.  We also sold the treatment for it.

  18 hours ago, Marty Roth said:

back in the late '50s or early '60s, one of my cars came with another product which I believe was called Nenette, or something similar,

and worked like the duster, but was retained in a metal cylinder when not in use. It also had some treatment to be used in the storage cylinder.

GM in Canada at least, sold the Nenette duster in the 50's, 60's and 70's.  Some years it was sold as Nenette and some years it was in the accessory book with a GM label.  We also sold the treatment for it.

 

Thank you-

just a reminder that I'm older than the dirt (dust?) on my cars

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I've been using one for the 8 plus  years I've owned the car.  I do shake the duster a few times while dusting the car.  I have washed this Buick only ONCE since it rolled out off the delivery truck almost nine years ago.   So I'd say "works for me"  Sorry these photos are so large.  Not sure what I did. ? 

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Edited by 414TATA (see edit history)
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