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1937hd45

The Ridgefield Meet 1967

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2 hours ago, Steve_Mack_CT said:

Wonder if those brake drums are in spec... ūüėĀ

I would think so, they would have 52 years less use. Bob 

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My first job out of college was at Burndy Corp in Norwalk, CT. I was there 1961-1965. I attended the Ridgefield Meet once or twice during those years. Only recollection I have is of an ancient race car with the number 16 on the radiator. Folks, we are talking the LOUDEST CAR EVER CREATED BY MANKIND. WOW!!! Happy daze indeed. 

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I think Old16 was at Ridgefield twice, this shot is from 1967, it is now in the Henry Ford Museum. Peter Helck also owned the Benz-Mercedes and drove that down from Boston Corners, New York in 1965. It is now apart getting the cylinder liners repaired in Jay Leno's Garage. Bob 

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Edited by 1937hd45 (see edit history)
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The first video at 1:11 or so appears to show my 1919 Locomobile Sportif in the background -- the big blue-green touring car. At that time Lee Davenport owned it, in original condition. He lived in Greenwich CT, but since the car came out of Ridgefield I can easily imagine him taking it back for a homecoming. He drove the car a lot on area tours and meets. The car is now restored and living with me down in Texas.

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3 minutes ago, jrbartlett said:

The first video at 1:11 or so appears to show my 1919 Locomobile Sportif in the background -- the big blue-green touring car. At that time Lee Davenport owned it, in original condition. He lived in Greenwich CT, but since the car came out of Ridgefield I can easily imagine him taking it back for a homecoming. He drove the car a lot on area tours and meets. The car is now restored and living with me down in Texas.

 

 

Here it is in 1971 unrestored. Bob 

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Wow. Do you have any other photos of that beast? This photo must have been taken right before the restoration began, as I know they were working on it during the '71-'72 timeframe. I have photos of the disassembled car with a newspaper in the foreground with a headline saying "McGovern Wins Primary" or something like that,

 

Like I've said in the past, if you guys ever revive the Ridgefield meet, I'll bring the Locomobile up all the way from Texas.

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Is the red coupe (and the drophead next to it) a Bugatti ? Which model ? Wonder if Jag stole that rear view.

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4 minutes ago, padgett said:

Is the red coupe (and the drophead next to it) a Bugatti ? Which model ? Wonder if Jag stole that rear view.

 

Atalante Coupe
Chassis #: 57624
Engine #: 448

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Thank you. The square bottom split grille had me confused.

 

People were different then: no canes, scooters, and a lot less poundage.

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On ‚Äé2‚Äé/‚Äé8‚Äé/‚Äé2020 at 8:24 AM, Walt G said:

Even up until the early 1970s anyone who owned a car with running boards was considered somewhat mentally unbalanced ( really - they did) , that determination ended about a decade later when you were then considered a "rich" eccentric who 'invested' in old cars so that made you rich.

I actually DO remember that. 

 

In 1971, I knew someone who was restoring a late 1930's RR Phantom III. He had ordered a set of the rubber strips with the retainers & end pieces for the running boards from the factory, which Rolls Royce actually still stocked at the time.  Many of us thought he was kind of eccentric and somewhat 'unbalanced' by spending that kind of $$$ for the parts PLUS shipping all the way from England, which itself was very expensive as they came in a long cardboard tube and took a couple of months to arrive when he could have probably made them himself from local material.  Of course, by decade's end, most of our attitudes towards that had all changed.

 

Craig

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