Buick35

converting electric clock to windup

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I was unable to get my electric clock in my 35 Buick to work and was wondering if anyone replaced one with a windup one using the same housing.Greg

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

If the lowest line model had an 8-day clock, its an easy switch.

 

Otherwise, identify the make, (Borg? New Haven?) and match it up with an identical brand and face diameter wind-up clock from the same era.   The hand shaft diameters should be the same to make an easy switchover for the hands, and the same diameter face would ensure the distance from the hand shafts to the reset/stemwinder is the same so as not to have to modify the Buick clock face any.

 

Craig

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Thanks,it's a borg. I took it apart this afternoon and cleaned it good with electrical cleaner and compressed air and sanded the points. It worked for about 45 minutes on 6volts then it started smoking and getting hot again.I thought I had it fixed,darn! Greg.

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Remember an automobile is the WORST place for a clock to try to live. 

Freezing in the winter, scorching in the summer, exposed to dust and dirt as well as vibrations. 

House clocks enjoy a consistent temperature, out of the elements and sit quietly on a shelf for decades. 

 

Older house clocks were built to a quality standard. Typically car clocks are built to a price point (not always true for ancient expensive makes) 

 

Thinking about clearances, tolerances and lubrication of a precision instrument, it is a wonder any car clock would function longer than 12 months after being put into service. 

 

One significant advantage to having car electronics is getting a clock that functions reliability for decades. 

Personally I have given up on making any of my car clocks function. 

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18 hours ago, m-mman said:

Older house clocks were built to a quality standard. Typically car clocks are built to a price point (not always true for ancient expensive makes) 

Thinking about clearances, tolerances and lubrication of a precision instrument, it is a wonder any car clock would function longer than 12 months after being put into service. 

The finest clocks in the world for keeping time were your 'Railroad Standard' chronometers which had strict minimum standards for weekly loss or gain which were also subject to the same conditions of a automobile clock.  They were made by Waltham and Elgin, which later supplied timepieces for cars.

 

Craig

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True about Railroad watches being adjusted to temperature, position and rate. However, they were carried in the pockets of the crew. A much less harsh environment than hard mounting to a control panel or dash. 

 

My Waltham 37 size 8 day car clock was reconditioned and installed on the dash of my ’26 T. It quit running in less than 6 months. The harsh ride and vibrations of the T did it in. I had previously installed a late ’20s Westclox car clock with similar results. Dead in a few months. I am done trying mechanical clocks in the T.  

 

At some point, I would like to try installing a ruggedized quartz movement in the Waltham 37 case utilizing the existing dial and hands saving the Waltham movement for spares.

Perhaps these clocks worked better on Buicks, Cadillacs, Packards or similar higher end cars that were relatively smooth in comparison to a Model T.  As m-mman pointed out, an automobile is a harsh environment for a mechanical clock.

 

 

 

 


 

Edited by AzBob (see edit history)

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1 hour ago, AzBob said:

True about Railroad watches being adjusted to temperature, position and rate. However, they were carried in the pockets of the crew. A much less harsh environment than hard mounting to a control panel or dash. 

 

My Waltham 37 size 8 day car clock was reconditioned and installed on the dash of my ’26 T. It quit running in less than 6 months. The harsh ride and vibrations of the T did it in. I had previously installed a late ’20s Westclox car clock with similar results. Dead in a few months. I am done trying mechanical clocks in the T.  

There are hour meters (which is essentially a clock) used on construction equipment and other heavy duty machinery that calculates the time by vibration; some in very excessive, and harsh environments, arctic and tropic.

 

Craig

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On 2/8/2020 at 2:33 PM, Buick35 said:

It worked for about 45 minutes on 6volts then it started smoking and getting hot again.I thought I had it fixed,darn! Greg.

 

 

I asked about my non-working clock over at the vintage Thunderbird forum. A couple of the responses mentioned the need for clock compatible oil as a lubricant. Applied judiciously. Just passing on what they told me. 

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A friend of mine installed a cheap battery powered clock movement in his 1938 Graham, it looked great and works.

 

 

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Could there be a clock delete option? In Pontiac in 1936, you could get an electric (Borg or similar) clock in the glovebox door. Or, there was also a "mirror watch" (windup clock) available that went in the rearview mirror.

 

Did Buick have similar options? If so there was probably a "clock delete" plate available.

Edited by Bloo (see edit history)

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I took the electric wound clock out of my 55 Ford and installed a wind up model,since I spent 100 dollars getting the wind up repaired its going to be in the car awhile. I am going to get the original repaired one day.

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I had 2 1953 Buick Specials in the 60's.  Both had electric clocks and similar mileage.  One worked perfectly for over 5 years.  The other one would only run for a week or two at a time.

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