Hudsy Wudsy

Accesories -- How Do You know When To Stop?

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I went small time and put on fog lights and an exhaust deflector....then pulled them off. I’ll go with the “just off the assembly line” look.

Edited by Steve9 (see edit history)
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2 hours ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

 

Imperials in the late 1930's were not luxury cars,

were rather in the middle of the line.  But I get your point---

 

Since our focus is on correctly preserving history,

I think it's appropriate to keep on the car only the

options which that particular example had.

 

 

 

The point is business coupes are not necessarily stripped down low-end makes.  Some makes produced them in top-of-the-line trim and some higher-end makes also produced the body style.

 

If by "particular example" you mean a specific car, it's likely impossible to know what has or hasn't been on it over the past 100 years or so.  Taking that to the absurd, the car should have the factory-installed coolant in the radiator, gas in the tank, oil in the crankcase, and air in the tires.  So I have no problem with a couple OEM accessories regardless whether they were factory, dealer, or owner installed.  I also have no problem with a period-appropriate aftermarket accessory or two.  I do have a problem when the sheer number of accessories makes the car look like a circus wagon.  But it's the owner's to accessorize as he/she pleases.

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A number of you have correctly noted the difference between factory authorized options and after market items. That's a valid distinction for those who value authenticity and I hadn't given that much thought when I started this topic. I just know that sometimes too much is too much. What good is it all if it makes the car look silly?

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I took these from an eBay auction many years ago. 

Typically you only see over accessorized cars presented as restored at shows and you wonder IF they were ever really that loaded up when they were new. 

 

This was obviously some man's dream boat. Likely he had a status in the community and wanted to display his tail feathers.

He must have really felt proud and flashy driving it around. 

 

When it was finally not usable for transportation he obviously couldn't bear to part with it (some dreams never die) so it got parked next to the driveway and finally upon his death it was going away. 

More than any car I have seen this one really seemed to reflect the personality of its owner. 

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I put this out there at the risk of being open to some criticism but....

 

I bought it to save from heading to the scrapper due to a divorce pretty much as you see it.

I added the visor, tonneau cover, door glass rain shields, headlight eyebrows and chromed the hood nose trim all of which could be taken off if wanting too.

It has it's original flat head (albeit smoking) V8 (NOT a SBC!) with a three speed on the column transmission, rebuilt standard brake system and it's original 6 V "positive ground" wiring.

2007693693_Sept152011-pic2-Copy(3).thumb.JPG.424a77ffc90556bc014fb8ec365dc0bf.JPG

 

It's a fun driver, not a street rod, good to 55 mph with it's original gearing in the rear end.

Like it or hate it... it's paid for. 🙂

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You guys may not care for these people's accessory add-ons but on a global level, they're strictly amateurs. 

The Filipinos have taken accessorizing bling to DEFCON 2 level. 😄

 

 

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Well, that era isn't really my cup of tea. However, I have closely examined, studied would be a better word perhaps, literally tens of thousands by now original era photographs. Mostly I study 1930 and earlier, although I have probably examined a couple thousand from 1930 to '60 as well.

My opinion. I like my cars to look like they were cut out of an era photograph. If the cars really, in considerable numbers, had certain accessories? I don't mind them on cars. I have had a few cars, mostly model Ts, and mostly a couple speedsters, that had quite a few accessories. But I also had what I referred to as my "well accessorized coupe"! I never counted, but between after-market headlamp lenses, the fatman wheel, a Ruckstell (one of the few accessories that Henry Ford actually approved! An original era overdrive transmission and brakes, it must have had well over a dozen accessories. But nothing gaudy.

Most of my non-Fords have had an item or two. Many cars had added radiator caps, most with Motometers. A spotlight here, original era rear-view mirror there. The '25 Studebaker I had had a very nice after-marked BiFlex front bumper. My series 80 Pierce Arrow had a very nice original era trunk on the back, a perfect fit, not too small, yet understated. My intention for the '15 T runabout is that it will have one visible non-factory item. An original brass era rear-view mirror (Califunny actually requires two, but I don't plan to put on a second one).

When one studies era photos? One does see a fair number of after-market accessories on cars. And, occasionally, even a gaudy over-the-top car. But gaudy cars were not common, not in the '10s and '20s, not in the '40s and '50s. And certainly NOT in the '30s! Personally, I like cars that look like most any car in a traffic picture. 

I do think that some small amount of accessorizing should be allowed in car shows. That is the way cars were used when they were nearly new!

But that is me.

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The most accessorized (or “excessorized”) Model T I have ever see was one I unearthed in 2015 after an almost 50 year slumber. If I recall there were over 20 accessories. First picture is after I cleaned it up, second picture is Louis Secon, builder of the car. This b/w picture was taken at a car show celebrating 25 years of the AACA!

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12 hours ago, m-mman said:

I took these from an eBay auction many years ago. 

Typically you only see over accessorized cars presented as restored at shows and you wonder IF they were ever really that loaded up when they were new. 

 

This was obviously some man's dream boat. Likely he had a status in the community and wanted to display his tail feathers.

He must have really felt proud and flashy driving it around. 

 

When it was finally not usable for transportation he obviously couldn't bear to part with it (some dreams never die) so it got parked next to the driveway and finally upon his death it was going away. 

More than any car I have seen this one really seemed to reflect the personality of its owner. 

 

 

cfeb_1.jpg

d2e5_1.jpg

d17a_1.jpg

cc1a_1.jpg

Look at the side profile of this 57 StarChief 4 dr. hardtop. Although I don't like it at all and I prefer to see a Chieftain Catalina 2 dr hardtop or a Chieftain 2 dr sedan like the one that won the 1957 Grand national Race at Daytona that ushered in Pontiac's announcement to the world that "We are going racing and build some excitement" I totally get what this guy was trying to do. He probably saw a 1958 Cadillac 60 Special;

ce0b_1.jpgImage result for 1958 cadillac fleetwood 60 special

 

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Add enough accessories to you new Model T and for the cost, you could have been driving a Buick . . . . 

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 So to answer the question " How do you know when to stop"

 

If I was judging a car it would be simple. Most judges will not know or have a build sheet on the vehicle and that means anything that was a factory option or a factory authorized dealer installed option is OK.

 

If it's a street car going down the street?, Well for now we live in a country that will allow you to do almost anything (with the exception of safety concerns and emissions tampering) you want to do and I like it that way. 

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Despite my distaste for many accessories (and too many accessories), I still think you should stop only when you're happy with the car. What I like is limited to me and mine. What you like is your business. I can respect that and as long as you're having fun, it's all good!

 

Nevertheless, this one still bothered me a lot. A sun visor on a convertible?!? WTF?

 

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This guy could not bring himself to stop adding non-factory accessories....

Pontiac with stuff.jpg

Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)
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3 minutes ago, keiser31 said:

This guy could not bring himself to stop adding non-factory accessories....

Pontiac with stuff.jpg

 

This fella could have used an intervention a long, long time ago. However, is there something sort of "photoshopy" about this pic?

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Every time I see this Pontiac I wish I owned it.

This guy is having more fun than most.

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10 minutes ago, Hudsy Wudsy said:

 

This fella could have used an intervention a long, long time ago. However, is there something sort of "photoshopy" about this pic?

It's an old post card photo, so I doubt it was altered.

Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)

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16 hours ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

 

Imperials in the late 1930's were not luxury cars,

were rather in the middle of the line.  But I get your point---

 

Since our focus is on correctly preserving history,

I think it's appropriate to keep on the car only the

options which that particular example had.

 

Imperial certainly made luxury cars. They were top of the Chrysler line and sold against Buick, Packard, LaSalle, and Cadillac. You could buy an Imperial limousine on a 144 inch wheelbase. All came with a 130HP 323 cu in straight eight engine and Fluid Drive transmission. It is true they did not have anything comparable to the V12 Packard or Pierce Arrow or V16 Cadillac but who did? Those could be characterized as "ultra luxury cars" outside the range of normal mass produced vehicles.

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6 minutes ago, keiser31 said:

It's an old post card photo, so I doubt it was altered.

 

I just had cataract surgery this past month and I really am seeing things differently. I'm back to where I was decades ago, as far as acuity. The thing that amazes me the most is how colors have shifted. I have a Honda C-RV that I use to get groceries in. It's color is "Titanium". I thought it was brown, or at least more brown than gray when I bought it. After the surgery in my right eye (they do the replacement surgeries one at a time, two weeks apart) I could stand by the window and look out at the Honda with each eye closed, one at a time, and marvel at the difference in the color. I knew that the lenses in our eyes develop thickened spots that cause little obstructions, but I didn't realize how the lenses discolor over the years. I really am elated at the results. The surgery was completely without discomfort and lasted about fifteen minutes per eye. The Opthalmologist who did my eyes said that he was doing eight others that morning. If this type of work is pending for any of you other old guys, embrace it -- you'll wonder why you ever procrastinated!

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54 minutes ago, Matt Harwood said:

Nevertheless, this one still bothered me a lot. A sun visor on a convertible?!? WTF?

 

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Apparently, from the number of Step-Down Hudson convertibles with sun visors I encountered in junkyards here in the '60's, it was something a dealer or multiple dealers promoted.   Most sedan and coupes were equipped with them too, so possibly it was a thing for dealers to sell the idea since the convertible had such a broad windshield header.   But, yeah, it looked ugly then and still does!  

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43 minutes ago, Hudsy Wudsy said:

 

This fella could have used an intervention a long, long time ago. However, is there something sort of "photoshopy" about this pic?

 No intervention necessary. Just be glad this fella lives in a country that gives people the freedom to do what they want. If that car makes him happy, then I'm happy he's enjoying it.

 

I'm very partial to Pontiac's-Real Pontiac's. My dad had a beautiful 50 Chieftain Deluxe, all stock, straight eight, 4 speed HydraMatic and a few bling factory STOCK accessories. My image of a 50 Pontiac is my Dads car , but that's not everyone's image.   

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With a visor you needed the dash prism to see traffic lights. Think one is on the Olds dash.

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You stop when they no longer deliver J. C. Whitney catalogs in the mail. 

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Almost all car stand on their own merit.  All the doodads just distract from the original design.

 

Matt hit the nail on the head.  The owner is bored and wants to keep tinkering.   The result is something like a circus wagon.

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That 40 Pontiac without all the do-dads, would be "your Grandfathers car"

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