Hudsy Wudsy

Accesories -- How Do You know When To Stop?

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It would look alot better with just hte dumb , dummy spots headlight visors and extra mirror removed.  Most the rest was catalog order stuff you could get at the dealer from GM. 

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I've never seen such conspicuous headlight "awnings" before. They're gigantic.  I wonder what a view of the rear would show? I'll bet it surely has a ground strap and some sort of correct pre-war trailer hitch clamped onto the rear bumper.

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2 minutes ago, Hudsy Wudsy said:

I've never seen such conspicuous headlight "awnings" before. They're gigantic.  I wonder what a view of the rear would show? I'll bet it surely has a ground strap and some sort of correct pre-war trailer hitch clamped onto the rear bumper.

I was wondering the same thing, looks like some kind of grille across the back window.  Does kind of remind you of the people you see walking down the street and you think to yourself - I wonder if they looked in the mirror before they left and thought that they looked good as they headed out the door

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My buddy has everything from the Chevrolet accessory list on his 1937 Chevrolet....even a pipe rest on the dashboard....

File0224.jpg

Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)
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I see cars like that and assume that it's a guy who likes doing projects but he's already done everything that can be done. I get it--I enjoy the tinkering as much as the driving and would be bummed if I had a car that was "all done" (not like that'll ever happen, but I understand).

 

FYI, this is what's in the back window:

 

s-l300.jpg  1940_1948_plymouth_chrysler_blinds.jpg

 

The good news is that you can take all that stuff off except maybe the windshield visor and the spots, which probably required drilling. Then it will look like this:

 

001.thumb.JPG.ee70fa4f51c084ff3cdad6d3dd75299e.JPG

 

Whenever a car shows up with non-stock fender skirts or those headlight covers or visors, my guys know to remove all that stuff before it's even in the door. And windshield visors, IMHO, should be a crime.

 

 

Edited by Matt Harwood (see edit history)
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31 minutes ago, 3macboys said:

I was wondering the same thing, looks like some kind of grille across the back window.  Does kind of remind you of the people you see walking down the street and you think to yourself - I wonder if they looked in the mirror before they left and thought that they looked good as they headed out the door

The rear window has a venetian blind in it. They were somewhat more popular after the war. You raise a good point about people looking in the mirror before they leave home. I think that for many of us, we loose our objectivity over time and can no longer judge. I'm having a little good natured fun with this Pontiac, but I think that we've all seen beautiful classic cars with so many road lights, fog lights and club badges, etc. on the front that the beauty of the car is lost and muddled. The trouble is who can we trust for objectivity? And will we ever speak to them again after they've been they're honest with us?

Edited by Hudsy Wudsy (see edit history)
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Weren't skirts a dealer sanctioned option in 1940?? I know for sure they were a option from 1941.

I know from at least 1948-54 the sunshade visor was a dealer installed option and the skirts were either dealer or factory installed option.

 

another 40, this car is owned by the AACA - Oakland Pontiac chapters club historian.

AACABlacksburgVA019elg.jpg

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I prefer no add on stuff, but as long as it can be removed with out damage no big deal. I was able to purchase (for a car dealer I was working for at the time) a near mint condition 1981 Dodge pick up because it was slathered in after market junk. The original owner was one of those guys that loved it, babied it and like Matt said had to fuss and fiddle with it, because nothing ever needed restoring. Always kept inside and undercoated yearly it was a "Real Peach". The salesman at the Dodge Ram dealer had no idea, and  lowballed the owner on a new one because the original muffler was finally making noise and owners wife wanted new with air conditioning. It was festooned with every piece o' crap available at low price auto parts stores. Hard to tell it was really nice due to the real truck obscured by junk and noisy exhaust.

 Spent a day removing the junk, degreasing the exterior where the oil undercoat was and it just sparkled. I was working for a used car dealer that bought it wholesale and said I would take it for myself since my Lil Red Express project was stalled. He said if it doesn't sell within 2 days it was mine. It sold to the 1st guy who seen it even before the ad came out. My huge mistake. Should have just paid full retail!

Edited by Ed Luddy
clarity (see edit history)
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What I'm getting at is: are skirts and sunshade OK on a AACA show field? 

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I'm into early-fifties Plymouths and when I see a low-line car (like a business coupe) loaded with every possible accessory it just looks bogus.

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5 minutes ago, Harold said:

I'm into early-fifties Plymouths and when I see a low-line car (like a business coupe) loaded with every possible accessory it just looks bogus.

I agree. The base model cars really look bad with add on's. Tri 5 Chevy 150 Del Rays seem to be the worst victims

 

5 minutes ago, Harold said:

 

 

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8 minutes ago, Ed Luddy said:

I agree. The base model cars really look bad with add on's. Tri 5 Chevy 150 Del Rays seem to be the worst victims

 

 

 

Would love to see this car in profile.  Because of the angle of the picture I can't tell if it's a A or B body.

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29 minutes ago, Harold said:

I'm into early-fifties Plymouths and when I see a low-line car (like a business coupe) loaded with every possible accessory it just looks bogus.

 

 

Early-50s Plymouth business coupes may be low-line but not all are - just sayin'.  But I agree about over-accessorizing.

 

76591138_1937ChryslerImperialBusinessCou

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23 minutes ago, CHuDWah said:

76591138_1937ChryslerImperialBusinessCou

 

Imperials in the late 1930's were not luxury cars,

were rather in the middle of the line.  But I get your point---

 

Since our focus is on correctly preserving history,

I think it's appropriate to keep on the car only the

options which that particular example had.

 

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)

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Many People don't realize in 1940 and 41 Pontiac's were built on "A" body ( with Chevrolet ) "B" body with Buick and Olds, and "C" body Series 62 Cadillac, 90 series Buick and Olds 98.

here is a "C" body 41 Pontiac and notice, that skirt is supposed to be there;

621162-970x441.jpg

 

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It's a matter of taste. Some people think that more is better and strive for every accessory made for their car. If you plan on having your car judged, don't expect to gain extra points by having accessories, as many clubs judge the vehicle as it came off the assembly line. Some will deduct points by having non-authorized accessories. I think an abundance of accessories makes the car look too "California Low Rider", less is more, in most cases.

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My 1926 Model T has every factory Ford, but dealer installed accessory that was available in that year plus a header clock and bud vases... makes it look more Model A-ish than anything. Wire wheels and bumpers were big sellers at the time.

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Didn't know that Pontiac had an automagic in '40.

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21 minutes ago, padgett said:

Didn't know that Pontiac had an automagic in '40.

 

It didn't. Pontiac received HydraMatic in 1948, the same year Buick introduced Dynaflow.

Chevrolet received Powerglide in 1950.

Oldsmobile gets HydraMatic 1940

Cadillac gets Hydramatic in 1941

Edited by Pfeil (see edit history)

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I think it's a matter of taste if you put on the optional skirts or visor made by the OEM to fit it as an option, but aftermarket skirts and visors don't fit the same.

The sunvisor on the original cars looks aftermarket to me.

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