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Wanted: 31 Pierce Arrow Model 41 LeBaron Mechanics manual


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I’m guessing you are new to the Pierce-Arrows...

 

 I bought a 1931 Model 43 last year and quickly found out that no mechanical manual exists for them. Your best bang for the buck is to join the Pierce-Arrow Society and as a member you will be able to purchase a CD containing every one of the clubs service bulletins from the early 1960 to today. They have a tremendous amount of information on all year cars and are in a searchable PDF format.

 

If you can, please post pictures of your car, here’s one I’ve posted several times here of my car 

 

 

EDCFFD12-7F2E-43AD-875D-38D75213F5C6.jpeg

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You can also ask questions on the Pierce Arrow Society forum if you’re a member.  No matter what issue your car might have, someone else has had the same issue and can help you.

 

Yes, post pictures, what a great car you have!

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Pierce-Arrow never published shop manuals/mechanics' manuals.  The last Pierce Owner's Manual (OM--often called "Operation and Care Manual") with any mechanical adjustment information was the 1929 OM.  Pierce owners' manuals are available to PAS owners for free download from the Members' Section of the PAS website.  For routine adjustments/tuneups, there is sufficient information in these manuals.  Many 1930 and 1931 owners also download and use the 1929 OM for this information.  For example, 1931 Models 41 and 42 used the same ignition components as 1929, so the settings are identical.

 

As David (trimacar) advised above, posing questions on the "Message Board" in the PAS Members' Section (similar to this site) will get you information from hands-on experts with knowledge of current materials and techniques in near-real time.

 

By far the best bet for PAS members is to order from the PAS "Company Store" a DVD/CD of PAS "Service Bulletins" covering a 60-year period, usually six issues per year.  These media are searchable pdf files.

 

Another alternative for 1931 is the National Service Data (NSD) subscription manuals marketed to repair shops during that era, covering almost all marques including Pierce.  However, you should know that there were two different subscription levels: the more limited is ignition and electrical components; the more comprehensive also includes other systems such as steering boxes, differentials, transmissions, etc.  These are often on eBay, often pricey, but you should determine which subjects are covered--that is, whether the volume offered is either the electrical-only or comprehensive.  Title pages don't tell you...

 

TL:DR:  For quick questions, use the PAS Message Board; then order the DVD/CD of all the Service Bulletins.

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8 hours ago, Grimy said:

 

Another alternative for 1931 is the National Service Data (NSD) subscription manuals marketed to repair shops during that era, covering almost all marques including Pierce.  However, you should know that there were two different subscription levels: the more limited is ignition and electrical components; the more comprehensive also includes other systems such as steering boxes, differentials, transmissions, etc.  These are often on eBay, often pricey, but you should determine which subjects are covered--that is, whether the volume offered is either the electrical-only or comprehensive.  Title pages don't tell you...


 

Adding to Grimy’s advice about these manuals, do not waste your time with any “flat rate” version, all those give are the hours you should be able to do the work in, and what to charge for that work... Totally useless!
 

Keep a very close eye on eBay, I have found and bought the 1936 “Standard service manual” version that was mostly flat rate information but one or two tidbits which I have since found through the PAS Service Bulletins CD which is why I think it’s a useless book. Another one is a nearly mint copy of “Motor’s Factory Shop manual” for 1931-1937 cars which has a large section on PA as well as sections on individual systems which is handy. And finally a very helpful copy of a sales booklet for Pierce-Arrow Rockne and Studebaker cars service tools and equipment that is helpful if you are a mechanic who can look at a picture of a tool and understand how to use it. All three together cost less than $100 including shipping but I’ve also seen just the Motor’s manual priced in the $300 range, it just takes patience... One other book that has some small tidbits of information is the 16th edition of Dyke’s Auto Encyclopedia which I already had.

 

 I still think the best, most cost efficient information is to join the Pierce-Arrow Society, buy the CD, and ask the group for advice.

 

 

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Wow. This blew up. I appreciate everyone's input on this topic. I have mailed my application to the PAS and I am hoping to get me member # soon so i can start looking through their catalogs. I will get a photo up of my Pierce soon.

 

Does anyone think it is work it to purchase the Compatible parts catalog? I see a lot of them on Ebay but I don't think i would need one.

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Any information you may need I will have, much of it in my head. I have a Model 42........for forty years. Identical to a 41 except chassis length. I have worked on most of all the existing LeBaron cars over the years..........which one do you have.......here is my 1933 one off 1247 Enclosed Drive Limo, which now belongs to a collector on the West Coast.

DA95CF6D-E4F9-46C4-A04D-1E3459D27087.jpeg

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He may enjoy one of those one page Standards of Adjustment Automotive Electric Association spec sheets that speaks about such as ignition, timing, lubrication, basic wiring, and  - I have never looked for one for a PA, but had them for everything else under the sun. s-l500.jpg.846ff8c72f0854f438a6810882bd1b23.jpg

 

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Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)
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20 hours ago, edinmass said:

Any information you may need I will have, much of it in my head. I have a Model 42........for forty years. Identical to a 41 except chassis length. I have worked on most of all the existing LeBaron cars over the years..........which one do you have.......here is my 1933 one off 1247 Enclosed Drive Limo, which now belongs to a collector on the West Coast.

 

It is a 1931 Piece Arrow Club Sedan Model 41 - Coachwork by LeBaron Custom Club Sedan.  

 

Currently, i need help to get a radiator re-cored and would like it to look as original as possible. 

 

Edited by Charals (see edit history)
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20 hours ago, Charals said:

 

Currently, i need help to get a radiator re-cored and would like it to look as original as possible. 

 

Honneycombs are not cheap, but neither is your car, so worth doing right - I would go to Brassworks https://www.thebrassworks.net/

 

Even a standard recore in this geography of Ohio is running $1,500.00

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A friend just had a radiator done out of England for her Alfa Romeo Grand Sport Super Sport - I think she will come in under 50K :) when all is said and done via final paint work and .... - that is some sticker shock. I understand the only thing worse to do is a 30's Merecedes. 

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24 minutes ago, John_Mereness said:

A friend just had a radiator done out of England for her Alfa Romeo Grand Sport Super Sport - I think she will come in under 50K :) when all is said and done via final paint work and .... - that is some sticker shock. I understand the only thing worse to do is a 30's Merecedes. 

 

50K is about right for a really nice 540k/500K radiator.   Taking the car apart to put it in and put it back together could be another 10-20k depending on what goes on.  


The shell and cooling unit are integral.  So you need to unsolder them apart.  The the core is made from 12k individually soldered tubes.  The solder is on the outsides, the water passes between the tubes and the air through the tubes.

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