beardbros

SOLD: 1912 Buick Model 35

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We have for sale a well maintained and tour proven 1912 Buick model 35, chassis number 3582. Current ownership has been almost 40 years with one family who was in the business of restoring cars. Prior to that this Buick resided in a temperature-controlled auto museum. The restoration on this car was done before the museum display and is a little over 40 years old. The paintwork is as expected with some chips and scratches, overall it is in good driver condition. The wood and metal in this Buick are very good, it has never had any rust or issues with the wood framing. You can tell it has always been well cared for since new. The tires are in good condition and the top is solid except for a few very small holes smaller than a dime. The seats are still very comfortable, and the leather is intact and showing some age. A few items have been added for convenience and safety when touring such as seatbelts, speedometer/mileage counter, 12-volt headlights, taillight and turn signals which all run off a battery.  A couple other options on the car are an exhaust cutout and a left side running board mounted toolbox. Mechanically this Buick is ready to enjoy, and it starts quickly once all the proper settings have been made. Buick was known as an automobile of great power at this time period, and this car is powered by a 165-cid, 23hp OHV four-cylinder engine that runs extremely well. A 1912 Buick Model 35 was priced at $1,000, and if you added a top, glass front and a Prest-O-Lite gas tank and it would cost you $60.00 more. This is a great touring car that is ready to be enjoyed for years to come.

 

Priced very fairly at $26,500

 

Contact Jim at 815.252.7247

 

Here is a link to over 100 pictures along with starting and driving videos

 

https://photos.app.goo.gl/ogiwnN9jSgD1qYAo9

 

IMG_0419.JPG

Edited by beardbros (see edit history)
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Very good value and a lot more fun then a model T!

 

good luck with your sale.

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I have one of these, but a southern widetrack. The engine's a bit smaller than a Model T, but it pulls like a train.  Very strong.  Comfortable cruise is 35-40.

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The engine is smaller then a T?

 

thought a T was rated around 14 hp???????????

 

prey tel.

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1 hour ago, mercer09 said:

The engine is smaller then a T?

 

thought a T was rated around 14 hp???????????

 

prey tel.

First, nothing is more fun than a Model T.  Second,  the T is 176 CID and in 1912 would be 22 BHP. That said, I couldn't agree more with you that this looks like a fun car and a very good value. 

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I have two of them. A McLaughlin -Buick Model 35 I have toured in for 15 years. Hope to have it at Hershey this year for the show and Hangover tour.. It will cruise on flat ground a 35-40 MPH like Gil mentioned above with the 22.5 HP engine that maybe is a bit more with the aluminum pistons. It runs about the same cruising speed as my 1911 T but the ride is little better and most steeper grades you can do in 2nd gear at 25mph vs low at 15mph with a T. When comparing to a 30 HP car of the era, the cruising speed is about he same but they might run a little faster up a hill with a heavy load in the back seat. This a lot less money than a 30 HP car.  I also have a Flint bodied Model 35 I inherited from my father. Hope to get it running and sorted this year. It was a ground up restoration but not finished and sorted. A little nicer than a T but like any non Ford of this era, you need to get friendly with a tool maker if anything mechanical breaks. Probably 30-40 of these around the country and many are active on this forum or Brass Buicks. Best of luck to the seller and potential buyer. The seller may want to put this on HCCA site if not already.  Hope to see this one on a future tour! 

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so it looks like the engine sizes are about identical, but due to gearing and body weight, there are some minor differences?

 

I have a 1912 model 29 and it puts out about 26 hp. but it is def a heavier/larger car then a T.

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The Model 35 Buick engine is 3-3/4" bore and stroke.  It's basically the same engine as the better known, earlier Model 10 Buick.  The Model T Ford engine is the same 3-3/4" bore, but 4" stroke

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1 hour ago, mercer09 said:

so it looks like the engine sizes are about identical, but due to gearing and body weight, there are some minor differences?

 

I have a 1912 model 29 and it puts out about 26 hp. but it is def a heavier/larger car then a T.

 

Isn't the 1912 Model 29 bigger with a 201 cubic inch engine? I just picked one up and am gathering information, since my knowledge of this period is pretty thin.

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yes it is Matt. Why I mention the 26 hp.

 

not a race car, but can hit 50mph with a good wind behind it. The 3 speed is terrific over a T as well!

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14 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

 

Isn't the 1912 Model 29 bigger with a 201 cubic inch engine? I just picked one up and am gathering information, since my knowledge of this period is pretty thin.

 

Yeah but the compression ratio was only 4.5:1 in the early days and was later reduced to 3.98:1....... :blink:

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I hope someone with an interest in pre'16 touring is here and ready to buy.

 

I own and drive both the 3 3/4' and the 4" Buick engine cars.  The specs do not tell the story, the larger car is more comfortable, larger wheels, bigger brakes, etc.  The 4" car is in the mid sized category and this car is nicer than a Ford, should be more money but likely due to parts availability the Ford is more user friendly and desirable, IMHO.  However a nicely sorted 3 3/4" car, maybe this one, is more interesting and attractive than a T, again in my opinion. 

 

There are so many tours for brass era cars, someone should scoop this opportunity and go.  Best of luck, Gary

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On 2/8/2020 at 8:01 PM, jan arnett (2) said:

fun car

 

Jan, 

You should buy it. Less work than your Moon.

 

Tom

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Uh oh, the "sale pending" kiss of death.

 

NEVER announce sale pending. If/when your deal falls through, every other interested party has moved on. Also, it's bad juju--the moment you say "sale pending" is the moment your buyer vanishes like a fart in the wind.

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A friend who was a car salesman for many years said "they aren't sold until they roll off the lot."

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Good luck with the sale of Jim's Buick. I hope the new owner is, or will become one of us here. Please share your enjoyment of the Brass Buick with your forum friends ! Seems to be a wonderful driver.       -     Carl 

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On 2/5/2020 at 8:46 AM, ericmac said:

Second,  the T is 176 CID and in 1912 would be 22 BHP.

I am in the process in doing a 12 T Canadian touring at the present time. Not going to restore the car but the engine is getting a total rebuild and will not be stock internally. Except for the OF carb  and the Ruckstell axle that will be externally visible going on it will look stock . Not for the speed but to be better on the hills.

As for the T being more fun I think not as any pre 1916 car is a blast to drive.   

Edited by Joe in Canada (see edit history)

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12 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

Uh oh, the "sale pending" kiss of death.

 

NEVER announce sale pending. If/when your deal falls through, every other interested party has moved on. Also, it's bad juju--the moment you say "sale pending" is the moment your buyer vanishes like a fart in the wind.

I couldn't agree more. I've been on the bad end of this a couple times...and should know better!

Edited by ericmac
Clarification (see edit history)
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I agree, as I have had cases in the past where a buyer said he will be right back with the $ and you never hear from them again.

 

Lucky for me my "Sale Pending" did not bring the bad juju!

 

SOLD! to a member of the brass & gas club. It is going to a good home and will be driven and enjoyed!

 

 

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1 hour ago, beardbros said:

 

 

SOLD! to a member of the brass & gas club. It is going to a good home and will be driven and enjoyed!

 

 

 

Glad that worked out without a hitch. A fine toy ! I do hope the new owner will join us here, too, at least occasionally.   -   Carl 

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