1912Staver

Seller with unrealistic expectation

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1 hour ago, edinmass said:

Recently a well known member here asked me about selling off his collection...........the problem with collectors is ALL THE STUFF associated with car collecting. Truck and trailer, tools and shop equipment, books and literature, club publications, spare parts, the list is endless. Doing the math on time spent dealing with calls, emails, tire kickers, window shoppers, ect...........it’s a large and difficult undertaking. I usually recommend to people take the top ten or twenty valuable items, and sell them individually and the rest make a few piles of the stuff and wholesale it out fast. Interestingly, almost no one ever takes this advice. Oftentimes much of it ends up at the junk yard and landfill. We all have or dreams of our stuff being worth ten times what we have in it............fact is the opposite is true 99 percent of the time. 

 

I think we are all guilty of the same thing.    I'm always shocked when I go to sell something. What I really end up getting vs my perceived value before is usually quite different,  and I'd like to think I know what I'm doing.

 

 

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19 minutes ago, John_Mereness said:

Al and I had that discussion this week - from my experience selling/buying, the rule of thumb is that it better be a "exceptionally exceptional project car" or at a sale price under $99,999.99

 

And same theory pretty much applies at certain other levels lower too. 

 

Basically, my money, my time, my aggravation, my... and if you as a seller want to reap rewards then do all the work yourself and let's use your wallet doing it.

 

What seemed like "fun" 25 years ago feels overwhelming when I look at projects now.   Also,  when full sorted V16 Cadillac's are selling for 65k  - cats are living with dogs.

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2 minutes ago, alsancle said:

 

What seemed like "fun" 25 years ago feels overwhelming when I look at projects now.   Also,  when full sorted V16 Cadillac's are selling for 65k  - cats are living with dogs.

Yes !

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4 minutes ago, alsancle said:

 

Also,  when full sorted V16 Cadillac's are selling for 65k  - cats are living with dogs.

My Airedale thinks he would like a Cat.  He is probably wrong though.  That said, even if wrong he would still harass it and it would be living on top of the refrigerator. 

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IMO about 80% of all old cars listed anywhere for sale are overpriced. You either want to sell something or you don't. 

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The title of this thread: 

Seller with unrealistic expection

 

 

I could be wrong, but I think this is a good example of the phenomenon.  It's a really nice car, but, at that price, I don't think so (As I said, I could be wrong).

The link:

https://www.hemmings.com/classifieds/cars-for-sale/chevrolet/chevelle/2305409.html?refer=saturday&utm_source=saturday&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=2020-02-01

 

Cheers,

Grog

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Here is a short post that will scare you..........

 

in the last 90 days I have seen a bunch of nice, driving, open cars for sale..............the scary part?

 

 

All looked underpriced to me by 30-50 percent..........nice cars, and makes me think I need to adjust my price ranges on ALL cars.

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Lots of good comments and suggestions. I will keep in touch with the seller . 

 

Greg

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Yes some great comments here. Speaking of all those collectors who are occasionally looking to down size though -where on earth do all the good quality tools and shop equipment go to die? I keep hoping to see some nice tools being re-marketed in the general "parts for sale" forum but never really see any?  I'm surprised by this-apologies for veering off topic.

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Having sold nine brass Fords and seven Model A’s (all within 7-10 days of listing) in the last 35 years the biggest thing is KNOW YOUR MARKET.  There have been ups and down aplenty. I ask a fair price and do not negotiate much. When I buy, I explain the market to the seller, make my offer and leave my card after inspection. I stick to my offer and 90% of the time I get the car. Sometimes it takes 6 months. I realize this niche is and does not apply to everyone or other cars. This is what works for me.

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MD, have often wondered the same thing and can only guess a son in law gets the tools, because nobody wants to pay.

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12 hours ago, keithb7 said:

Patience. Let it sit and be ok with someone taking it from your hands by paying too much. If not,  keep waiting. You may get it someday for what is a realistic price. 

Excellent advice.

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3 hours ago, alsancle said:

 

You have a local hobby shop?   I haven't seen one of those in years.

They are big into RC boats and cars. But I think that craze is also slowing down.

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12 hours ago, keithb7 said:

Patience. Let it sit and be ok with someone taking it from your hands by paying too much. If not,  keep waiting. You may get it someday for what is a realistic price. 

Excellent advice

 

While I totally agree- also remember, we arent here forever. Many of us are older. How long are you gonna live? cant take any of it with you!

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One reality of selling any old car:   Most people that come to see what you have for sale are not really looking for a specific car,

They're just checking to see if they can buy cheap and re-sell it.    Sad, but true.   

I looked for a couple years for a 1934 Ford Fordor V8.  (This was in 2002 & 03)   Mostly what I found were modified cars with later

Ford V8's, some painted like Jelly Beans.   Finally I found one that looked great and ran poorly.  I told the seller I was interested in

the car but it had to run better.   I offered to return with my tools and parts to make it run better.  If I could, I would buy it.

He thru me out and said I was trying to cheap him.

Ten years later I heard he sold the car with a seazed engine for 30% of his asking price.  Sold to a Streetrodder who was thrilled to

get it.  I heard he drove it until the engine seazed, then parked in his garage.  I guess I wouldn''t have been able to make ot run better,

but we both coul;d have learned more about why it ran so poorly.

 

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Why do I the reader have to do the Google search to see what this Holy Grail looks like?  Sorry I have no interest in the problem. Bob 

Buckler-Car-4.jpg

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Sorry about that 1937hd. Here are some of the photo's I took of the actual relic. Diamond in the rough ? The independent rear end is interesting but a bit of a kludge. They normally used a standard Morris Minor live axle. Front suspension is also Morris. Steering rack has been moved to the front, neither a good idea ; you have to swap the spindles side to side, or in this case particularly well done. 

Please excuse the quality of the photos. The building where it is stored has poor lighting and my camera is so- so on flash setting. What is hard to see in the photo's is the amount of poorly executed work, rust perforated frame tubes, and all the rest. It is at this point little more than a guide for all the new parts that will have to be fabricated. I can't see much other than the standard Morris parts that can be reused .

 

Greg

DSC_9927.JPG

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Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)

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1912.......if you were there with a truck and trailer and cash........and he didn’t take you offer,  almost any offer, they are beyond reason. Hold out for more what? The market for that car is NON EXISTENT...........any offer should be accepted.

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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I agree completely. My original one is actually better in several ways than this one, and it was given to me free. The main attraction to this one is the known history and this body is actually better than mine. Almost all of them used one of the aftermarket bodies that were popular with home builders at the time. This body { Microplas Minstral } was popular and frequently used on Bucklers.

But even it is really only useful as a buck to take a mold off of.

My plan B for my existing car is to build an alloy body like a few of the Canadian ones had. The one below is the same chassis but a owner fabricated alloy body.  They were amatuer level club racers  not show cars. The important stull was under the skin.

ggydf.png.3f7167d81e38cfd85c220e5910bdf870.png

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)

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14 hours ago, 1912Staver said:

But the owner ; a daughter  who inherited it a few years ago is convinced it is worth a substantial sum. Very disappointing., on a number of levels.

 

Greg in Canada

 

When I had a music store, I referred to this tendency as "Antiques Roadshow syndrome." I haven't watched conventional TV in probably a dozen years, so I have no idea if that show is on anymore, but it'll probably have an impact for years to come. Perusing eBay is a great way to waste time for me, and it's my perception that most classic (not Classic) cars are overvalued by 50% or more, at least in terms of asking prices.

 

The comparison with more recent vehicles is dramatic: There are a bunch of nice looking 15 or 20 year old Mercedes and Jaguars selling for 6 to 7K...but trailer park quality sixties era 4-door Impalas with mag wheels are worth 8k+ ????

I don't think so!!!

Edited by JamesR (see edit history)

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1 hour ago, mercer09 said:

Excellent advice

 

While I totally agree- also remember, we aren't here forever. Many of us are older. How long are you gonna live? Cant take any of it with you!

 

I tend to forget the age factor. I'm 48 and I will wait out like the devil to get what I want for the price I'm willing to pay. If it sells I tell myself it was not meant to be. Or depending what it is, there could be another one turn up somewhere. A rare race car here in this example? Likely not. Parts for my mass produced vintage Mopar sedans? Yes very likely. That's my perspective because I have old 4 door sedans that the factory spit out by the boatloads, weekly. So I can understand the waiting game is limited for many.

Edited by keithb7 (see edit history)
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1 hour ago, 1937hd45 said:

Why do I the reader have to do the Google search to see what this Holy Grail looks like?  Sorry I have no interest in the problem. Bob 

Buckler-Car-4.jpg

 

Hi Bob, that one has a De Joux body , made in New Zealand . They are considered one of the nicer looking and well constructed body's of the era. Seldomly seen outside of New Zealand.

Buckler / De joux's still are very popular in New Zealand historic racing . About 25 chassis kits were sold there plus an unknown number of locally built replicas. But they are a different

model frame and look a lot different under the skin. Buckler built nearly 20 different models of frames plus a few complete cars. The frames were tailored to the specific area of motorsport

the buyer / builder was interested in. Plus some intended for street use. About 600 cars / frame kits in total. Huge variety of finished appearances , body styles.

Greg

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)

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1 hour ago, mercer09 said:

MD, have often wondered the same thing and can only guess a son in law gets the tools, because nobody wants to pay.

One thing to think about is the possibility that even if someone gets out of the car market he may still want to keep his tools "Just in case" 

Edited by plymouthcranbrook (see edit history)
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2 hours ago, edinmass said:

1912.......if you were there with a truck and trailer and cash........and he didn’t take you offer,  almost any offer, they are beyond reason. Hold out for more what? The market for that car is NON EXISTENT...........any offer should be accepted.

 

 

Sure isn't a Lotus 11. Bob 

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Seller  AND BUYERS with unrealistic expectation.

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