Peter Gariepy

Forum Usage Poll - Please Respond

What do you consider acceptable posts/conversations in the AACA forums?  

406 members have voted

This poll is closed to new votes
  1. 1. What do you consider acceptable posts/conversations in the AACA forums? (Click all that apply)

    • Restoration and maintenance - antique automobiles 25 years and older
      400
    • Modification and customization - antique automobiles 25 years and older
      190
    • Restoration and maintenance - modern automobiles (24 years old and newer)
      106
    • Modification and customization - modern automobiles (24 years old and newer)
      42
    • Antique automotive related topics - memorabilia, literature, books, etc.
      390
    • Modern automotive related topics - memorabilia, literature, books, etc.
      100
    • Automotive history and news - 25 years and older
      382
    • Automotive history and news - modern (24 years old and newer)
      132
    • Non automobile discussions - Religion, politics, etc.
      9

  • Please sign in or register to vote in this poll.
  • Poll closed on 02/09/2020 at 07:00 AM

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I agree, I wouldn’t come to this site to see modern car questions nor would I want to see any of the for sale forums with modern cars or parts. Perhaps adding some more forum categories might help. For example, the restoration forum. As joe p stated, while he is restoring his car, he is also making changes to better the design for reliability, drivability, and safety. His posts are in the restoration forum. If someone was restoring a car to OEM or as close to exactly how it was delivered, perhaps that restoration forum could have a name like “OEM restorations “. Currently I’m restoring a 34’ pickup but will changing the gear ratio and switching it to 37’ Chevy Huck brakes. While it’s still a restoration, it’s not OEM and would fit in the “restoration” forum. My recently completed 32’ Olds would fit in the OEM Restoration forum. How this would prove beneficial is for someone who’s looking to show at high level, would most likely view the OEM threads and someone restoring a vehicle to anything other 5han that show vehicle, would probably view the restoration threads. The whole purpose of the forums is for knowledge and information in my opinion. I believe some small separation of the categories would help define what is in those forum threads and steer the viewer to the threads that fit their criteria without having to go through a bunch of other posts.  One category I thought would be cool is something like “your other hobbies “ or something like that. I’m finding out by just posting things in my build threads, how many other car enthusiasts enjoy some of the same other hobbies I do. If there was a category for that, I believe many would enjoy it.

 

The AACA forums are the best out there and are specific to cars 25+ years and older. It should stay that way. Can we discuss other things done to the autos shy of hot rodding, sure, I don’t see why not. I enjoy reading and posting here more than anywhere else. The format and picture posting is the highest of any site I’m a member of. The no politics is a good thing as these days, politics are very tiring and we don’t need to hear more. Getting down from my soapbox now!

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I would like to be allowed to post about replacing/upgrading the overly complicated, really expensive (1/3 the cost of what I paid for the whole car), ECU-assisted factory carburetor on my now-classic and matching numbers 1989 Ford Festiva to a period correct and very simple early 80's Ford Escort carburetor. I only did this to keep it on the road and be able to display it at car shows and car meets like Cars and Coffee.  I'd hate to not have the ability to share my favorite collector car here because it's not "as it left the factory".  

 

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Edited by theastronaut (see edit history)
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1 hour ago, Matt Harwood said:

 

Anything with a 12-volt electrical system? :)

 

Anything with electric lights. 

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1 hour ago, Chris Bamford said:

 

I didn't check Box #2, although I essentially agree with JV's comments.

 

Confusing matters further, this forum is somewhat akin to a buncha buddies hanging around in the garage — most of the discussions are around our old, mostly original, cars but invariably the conversation includes some interesting new car technology or whatever, and that's fine too.

 

This can't be policed with hard and fast rules, we just need to have faith that the moderator(s) will make required content/attitude decisions using their best judgement and that's that.

 

I have that faith.

 

 

I agree. If you over regulate you will stifle a lot of conversations. People are bound to get off track occasionally. If the goal of this site is to create interaction, then let people have some leeway. If conversations get off track, then take appropriate action. 

 

As long as everyone is clear about what this group is about and we don’t have a lot of threads that are off topic, a comment or two shouldn’t be detrimental. It’s how conversations go in real life. Sometimes things get off topic, like the discussion about my truck door. I would understand if those comments got deleted and that conversation can happen by the messaging feature. 

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I don't mind seeing some information on the newer stuff, because someday they will be antiques!  It seems to be well balanced as is it right now as to the under 25 year old and over 25 year old vehicles.  

Leave the forums as is...  We have a great bunch of moderators that keep everything inline as far as I am concerned. 

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I like being able to come here and ask (and read) restoration questions and not be completely buried in non-restoration answers, so I just checked the restoration and related 25 year and older categories.

 

That said, I don't think absolute rigidity would be a good thing. I think the moderators are doing a great job here.

 

 

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I like the great majority of what I've seen on the forum since I created my profile in 2006.  I'm not totally against seeing some discussion of modification for safety reasons, and I might not get turned off too badly with some sort of customization, as long as it's not too radical.  

 

So much of what kinds of posts many might be willing to accept could depend on the perceived attitude of the poster.  Anything that seems pushy or in-your-face is probably not gonna fly.  And regarding attitude, the same might be said of some forum users in how they reply to some of these questionable posts.

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I guess I do not know what AACA stands for is it not Antique Car club ?? My thought any vehicle that car keep up in today's traffic is not an antique vehicle.    Mike

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I like the model that the Corvair Center Forum follows.  The forum is designed for and used by Corvair enthusiasts and 95% of the posts are relevant to Corvairs.  But it is not exclusive to Corvairs.

 

Topics that are not Corvair-related are labeled with the letters O.T. (off topic).  Off topic posts range from advice on fixing a home boiler to the death of Kobe Bryant.  

 

At the end of the day, forum readers are a diverse group with diverse interests.

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I belong to many auto forums so when I want to share information or have a good discussion about one of my Corvettes I don't go to my Mustang forum.

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There's a point where cars are no longer new, but aren't quite 25 years old and this is one of the few places I can count on getting educated help. For example, when I (finally) find my 1996-1999 Riviera, one of the locations I can go for good pre-and-post acquisition advice is the ROA portion of this forum.

Edited by J3Studio (see edit history)
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29 minutes ago, Mikefit said:

I guess I do not know what AACA stands for is it not Antique Car club ?? My thought any vehicle that car keep up in today's traffic is not an antique vehicle.

 

The AACA judges any stock vehicle 25 years or older, without exception.

 

This Merkur Left Me Stunned

 

Taken heading into the judging field at Hershey, five years ago.

Edited by J3Studio (see edit history)
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The "non-automobile forum" should have said anything EXCEPT religion and politics so there can be topics as diverse as what's a good brand of chainsaw or what restaurant chain has the best ribs, etc.... 

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I think it should stick to conversations of vehicles that fall within AACA judging guidelines, period.

 

Hot rods and highly modified cars aren't acceptable nor accepted at national AACA shows, and prolonged discussion of them should not be allowed on this forum.  There are lots of other hot rod and modified forums.  I really don't come on this site to read about the newest hydraulic jumping controls nor any other modern equipment.

 

I realize that some conversations may veer off into such things as disc brakes, but that should be kept at a minimum too, and not as a main topic of the forum.

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This AACA website is quite expensive to operate.  It is "Paid for by the dues paying members of the AACA" and "not by non-members".  I have a problem with allowing non-members vote to change the rules or format of a service provided free of charge to anyone interested in discussing 25 year and older vehicles.  I also take into consideration that the majority of the 60,000 +/- members do not even participate in the forums.  The majority of the frequent posters on this forum are not members of the AACA from the last data I had access to some years ago.  As Peter Gariepy stated this poll is just to get a feel for what directional changes are needed by hobbyist' and the outcome is non-binding of which I would think only the dues paying members would have the final decision.

 

On the other hand I fully understand the reasoning of the AACA for allowing non-members and general public to comment on the forums.  It is done to help us all along with projects, etc., and build the old vehicle hobby.  No problem.  

 

 

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We are all car people on this forum. As such we deserve the opportunity to discuss modern vehicles, and how we as car people compare and vet them. Most of us, or family members, drive more modern cars then the arbitrary twenty five year cutoff date. The forum has provided multiple options available to discuss real world problem, and opinions that are loosely related to vintage vehicles. 

 

Discussing cars of the past may be fine for us old timers, but it's going to bore some younger gear-heads to death. We give lip service to bringing in younger people into the hobby, but it doesn't make much sense to distance ourselves from the future of the hobby. If the AACA and it's vocal advocates (forum) want to continue to be relevant in the future of the hobby it has be be able to bridge the demographic gap. I think that as the premiere comprehensive car forum, it should be open to subjects that can help facilitate the advancement of the hobby into the later part of the twenty first century. 

 

When I responded to the survey I tried to stay away from modifications of modern cars. But as I organized my thoughts for what for this response, I wondered if restricting even this subject was a distraction from the openness of the discourse, that I have come to appreciate on this forum. It's important to have rules and standards for showing and judging, but we need to be open to divergent opinions. My feeling is if we don't like a particular thread the simplest  thing to do is ignore it.

 

Bill

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I am a purists,but I also like to see what folks are doing to the the car's,wether poem or not,as long as it looks original.some do amazing things ,making it safer along the way.I agree with VL,let some slide.There has been post on here ,where the car was far from original,never built,still here.He will take boxes,and perform amazing outcomes.So,it's not all about original car's,it's fun to see how they do it,sometimes with a few tools,and cash.

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I'm glad this thread accompanies the poll so that I can give some context to my survey answers. I did vote for a modern category ( history and news) and the modified antique category, but my strong preference is for original  or restored original cars.

 

I think the modern history and news (I think that's what the category is called) can sometimes produce threads that provide a very interesting contrast between the way cars are now and the way they used to be. And the way they are made. I don't usually start threads like these but will sometimes contribute to them.

 

As far as the modified antique category, I think sometimes some very serious car guys in that category can benefit from original old car experts that hang out at this forum (not me, of course.) Likewise, I've been helped a lot by people at other forums like the Ford Barn where there isn't much of a distinction between original and modified (though they pretty much stay with the old stuff.) Hot rodders can be great fabricators who can help original folks deal with some perplexing problems. Original car folks can help rodders with hard to find part sources and attention to detail on year-appropriateness and authenticity.

 

"Original" or "restored original" can mean different things to different people and there are gradations. I put a solid state sequential turn signal unit in my T Bird because I decided I wasn't going to try to keep the original unit functioning anymore. That - along with a replacement engine put in by a previous owner (right type and size, but a year or two off) - will make some other owners cry foul, yet I still don't want to modify the car more than I need to. That's where I'm at.

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I haven't looked at or posted here for long time. Somehow just kind of forgot about it being here. Interesting that the first thing I looked at upon coming back was this survey. I voted and was surprised to see that my choices coincided with the majority of votes so far. However, I wouldn't want this site to become so restrictive that someone can't mention something that in someone else's mind doesn't "fit" whatever rules are put in place. 

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2 hours ago, theastronaut said:

I'd hate to not have the ability to share my favorite collector car here because it's not "as it left the factory".  

I would suggest that there is not a vehicle that falls into the AACA guidelines or is judged by their rules that is "as it left the factory" even if you excluded tires, belts and other consumables.  A pre WWI Ford that was found in a prairie field and has been restored so that it looks as it did when it left the factory is not "as it left the factory" when the restorer hand made three fenders, made a new dashboard and coil box (the old ones were rotted away) and modified a hundred little pieces of modern hardware to appear period correct.

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I'd like to see another poll where modification is broken down into two parts.

 

1) Modified in keeping with original design, spirit, availability of materials and technologies.  Swapping an injection system that routinely failed with one from a couple years before or after would be acceptable.   Building a water pump from scratch while following period correct literature and design principles would be the high mark.

 

2) Dropping a small block 350 and Pinto chassis in.

 

Another poll might be for non-member subscription fees for the website.  Until I retire there's absolutely no way I can participate in anything other than the forums and since I've failed to locate the money tree, I do have to watch what I'm paying for.  I would *gladly* pay a small, optional, for non-members only, subscription fee for forum access.

 

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As someone that originally found this forum after I bought my (highly modified) 1963 Riviera, and subsequently left for a few years after getting tired of being lambasted about the modifications done to my car by various members, I have begun to come back every so often to try to help out with technical answers and if I need to find some bit of info I can't find on other forums.  I also own a modified 1972 Mach 1, 1974 F100, 1977 F250 Highboy, and a completely stock factory original (except for wheels) 1970 Coupe Deville with 90k miles that I am the second owner of.  I appreciate all kinds of cars, from factory fresh restos,  preserved cars, trucks, all the way to highly modified customs.  This has been a great source of info, and when I left I decided that this was not the sandbox for me to play in, and that was fine.  There's plenty of other forums out there for guys like me that build and enjoy all kinds of cars, fabrication, and customization.  The one thing I will say to everyone that is hard line "stock only" and wanting only vehicles that are manufactured before "such and such" year, especially the guys that think something like a car from the 50s is too modern, is this:  Be careful what you wish for.  If you haven't been paying attention for the last 20 years or so, check out some results from auctions and even what kinds of cars are put out there for sale at all.  Pay attention to what kinds of cars are at car shows, or Heaven forbid a car cruise where we actually drive our stuff in town (in traffic!!!!), that aren't associated with the AACA.......Completely factory stock is great. I love cars like that.  But they are not what is popular, and the cars/owners (I'm sorry to say) are a dying breed.  In 20 years, if the closed mindedness continues, there won't be anyone around to keep the classics going, at least not in the way that you want them to be.  Try to appreciate the fact that guys are keeping them going and alive for the world to enjoy, modified or not, and not letting them all rust away in junkyards, backyards, and "barns".

Edited by Black River (see edit history)
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Also, I think it's useful to allow for cars under

25 years old on our forum.  We don't want discussions

of how to fix the display screen on a 2015 Hyundai,

but many cars become collectible before they are

25 years old, and are saved by AACA car collectors.

People are already collecting their literature, too.

Some examples that are (or were) popular long

before they became antiques are:

 

---The Buick Roadmaster station wagons of the 1990's;

---The last-generation (2-seat) Ford Thunderbird convertibles;

---Cadillac Allantes--and they certainly need some help!

---The last Buick Rivieras, up to 1999, already seen at Buick meets;

    et cetera.

 

Such cars need to be fixed and well maintained so they can

make it into the AACA world in good shape! 

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I’m reviving my 1938 Plymouth. I’m not restoring it. I’m using modern wire, relays and fuses for example. I’m trying not to put $25k into a car worth $12k when I’m done. 
No major modifications to body, brakes, suspension, engine, drivetrain, etc. I maintain a thread in the restoration section here. 
 

So am I modifying a vintage car? If I am, I elect to let that be discussed here. I am against chopping, lowering, frenching, blowers, hot-rodding, rat-rodding, etc vintage car talk on here. 
 

I think we need to differentiate “hot-rodding” from “modified”.  The term modified is too broad. If I slightly modify my 1938 to make it safer, it could be labeled as “vintage modified”. No? If I put rack and pinion steering in it, a blown or super charged hemi engine, and air bags for examples,  it could be tagged as “hot-rodded”. 
 

“Modified” is too generic and broad.  Descriptive term definitions need to be tightened up in my opinion. 

Edited by keithb7 (see edit history)
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I myself like early cars,brass cars,20s cars 30s care I believe most interest on this site is pre w w2  or maybe it’s just me my ,thinking,if you want a street rod that’s your business but I think your better suited for the h.a.m.

b. ,the aaca tome is about preserving ,   Justdave

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