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The Car Which Shall Not Be Named III


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Don't feel bad!  Someone was able to fool a high-dollar auction company to accept a car that was possibly similar to your purchase.  The buyer of it also received the shock of his life:  https://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/forum/your-studebaker-forum/stove-huggers-the-non-studebaker-forum/62663-collector-car-auction-horror-story

 

I am glad you are taking the time and starting over from the beginning and doing it correctly this time. 

 

Craig

 

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Well, that was rather remarkable. Ordered that heater up there at 10 AM and by the time I got home it was sitting on my front porch. Holy crap, Amazon!

 

Plugged the heater in and dropped it in a fresh bucket of Evapo-Rust this morning and let it do its thing. Started at about 67 degrees and by the time I left this evening it was holding pretty steady around 150 degrees and the block was almost too hot to touch. Obviously it's hot and it's circulating through all the passages. The Evapo-Rust got a little darker by evening so it's definitely working. Interesting to note that by running both the heater and the pump on the same circuit, the heater steals enough electricity that the pump slows down and doesn't cavitate, so I don't have to throttle it with the valves.

 

We'll let it run for a few days and see what happens...

 

Heater1.thumb.jpg.85cf8bd197a7f942ee138ed7b53661af.jpg  Heater3.thumb.jpg.61f56ef5d21559f4f9f544d0da33bd74.jpg  Heater2.thumb.jpg.72d00362274d3e3ee5d56612fb3d3c9c.jpg

Edited by Matt Harwood (see edit history)
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Nothing better than a job done right.................I’m surprised the heater can hold the entire engine at that temperature...........I would do the radiator also........with new fluid and heat.........if it were original. 

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10 hours ago, edinmass said:

Nothing better than a job done right.................I’m surprised the heater can hold the entire engine at that temperature...........I would do the radiator also........with new fluid and heat.........if it were original. 

 

Radiator is $1800 worth of brand newness. Crazy thing must weigh 100 pounds. Only the tanks and brackets were retained, the core is 100% new.

 

Radiator1.thumb.jpg.b0b1d5153482d117f17158263500b971.jpg

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39 minutes ago, Matt Harwood said:

 

Radiator is $1800 worth of brand newness. Crazy thing must weigh 100 pounds. Only the tanks and brackets were retained, the core is 100% new.

 

 

You will be thanking yourself when you are out driving in 90 degree summer traffic.

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41 minutes ago, alsancle said:

 

You will be thanking yourself when you are out driving in 90 degree summer traffic.

 

I agree.......do the math on a tow home and the frustration of overheating and vapor lock............and......just for the record......just about 98 percent of all cars need a new radiator.................If you car is pre war and has a OEM radiator, while it might work and function, even in the heat.......it's probably only functioning at a percentage of the original flow and heat transfer. My 1915 Ford has the original core.........and flows about 95 percent......but the car overheats when its over 85 degrees due to poor heat transfer from the corroded tube and fin contact..........I hate to change it out on an origional car......but its going to have to be done.

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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Think anyone would buy a setup like that one to circulate Evapo-Rust through an engine? I did some minor re-engineering this evening and I think I could put together something more substantial, easier to use, and completely portable for like $60 if I buy the heater and pump wholesale. Think anyone would pay, say, $100-150 for a complete kit? Just pour in Evapo-Rust (or whatever you prefer) and plug it in.

 

I'm thinking I might hand the idea to my 14-year-old son, Cody, and see if he's willing to run with it as a business. Source parts, assemble a kit, market it. What do you guys think? Would you use such a thing? I'm going to use it on the '41 Limited as soon as I'm done with the Lincoln and there are a half-dozen other cars sitting around that I think could benefit from it. It doesn't get much easier than plug it in and let it work...

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I think that's a pretty good idea. Given how few people are mechanical enough to do their own work, a "Plug & Play" system might have a market.

You'd have to make it clear it isn't "guaranteed to work" though because you are bound to get someone trying it on an engine that it plugged solid with crud.

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27 minutes ago, Matt Harwood said:

Think anyone would buy a setup like that one to circulate Evapo-Rust through an engine? I did some minor re-engineering this evening and I think I could put together something more substantial, easier to use, and completely portable for like $60 if I buy the heater and pump wholesale. Think anyone would pay, say, $100-150 for a complete kit? Just pour in Evapo-Rust (or whatever you prefer) and plug it in.

 

I'm thinking I might hand the idea to my 14-year-old son, Cody, and see if he's willing to run with it as a business. Source parts, assemble a kit, market it. What do you guys think? Would you use such a thing? I'm going to use it on the '41 Limited as soon as I'm done with the Lincoln and there are a half-dozen other cars sitting around that I think could benefit from it. It doesn't get much easier than plug it in and let it work...

 

  UhOh!  You just NAMED it, sorta.😛

 

  Ben

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It’s a great thread so far.......consider this......at 20 dollars per gallon , it’s much, much cheaper and easier to use evapo rust than to just flush the block and radiator with plain water.......never mind the problems associated with water jacket removal, repair, broken and stripped out bolts, pushing water out the over flow, plugged radiator, ect , ect, ect.  Evapo does a lot of work for the money, doesn’t damage anything, and washes off with water........non toxic and no bad smells or fumes. The first time I used it to actually fix a car that was over heating.......I complained about the cost........after using it, it was a fantastic value for what it serviced.

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On 1/28/2020 at 1:20 AM, keiser31 said:

Good on you, Matt. I wish there was a way for some of us to get together to assist on the car, but it would probably end up with "too many cooks in the kitchen". Keep plugging away at it, buddy! We're with you in spirit, at least.

I couldn't agree more. Believe me,  for all the naysayers here there were many, many more of us who are pulling for you to get past this and have this be a car of dreams,  not of nightmares.  Best wishes with it.

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Matt, I must say that I really like your set-up for flushing the block. I just checked, and yes, Evaporust is now available in Australia, albeit at more than twice the US price.  The endorsement of Ed, yourself and others here has inspired me to bite the bullet and try the product in the unobtainium that I am currently working on. Thanks for the great thread.

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Bush....even at twice the price, it’s worth every cent. Make a good flushing system if the car doesn’t run. Operating the engine at 180 will increase the reaction five fold over room temp. Post a few photos if you can. 

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Here is a Pierce motor that is typical of what you find when you pull the water jacket cover.........it’s why flushing the block while it’s not connected to the radiator is important. After years of learning curve, we just pull the cover.......with all the bolt issues, and then mechanically clean it before we do the evapo rust treatment. Flashback!

FF0051CF-64FF-4CC2-A636-F7DA5D089347.png

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7 hours ago, edinmass said:

Bush....even at twice the price, it’s worth every cent. Make a good flushing system if the car doesn’t run. Operating the engine at 180 will increase the reaction five fold over room temp. Post a few photos if you can. 

 

It's the radiator that has been worrying me. Sitting for 55 years. I can imagine the crud that has solidified in the bottom. A good deal of loose rust scale came out of the block and head, after extensive poking around with wire, and flushing and blowing air through. I might leave the Evaporust treatment of the block until the engine is running. Any flushing on the engine stand would probably mean removal of the water-pump again. Although if the product dissolves any remaining rust, it may run well enough through the stationary vanes of the pump. I would like to avoid removal of the pump if I can, as it supports two freshly installed Morse chains.

 

Ed, with your radiators, am I to understand that you are filling them with solution, letting them stand, and inverting them periodically? I was thinking along the lines of Matt's system for the radiator. And a catching sieve in a radiator hose on start-up. Engine is 1926 Metallurgique 12/15.

IMG_3973.JPG

IMG_4022.JPG

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Thanks for the photos.......very cool car.......not often I see something for the first time anymore. Interesting set up with the pump, car is obviously exceptionally well made. Would love for you to start your own thread and post more photos and history. 
 

On the radiator using a pump is a best practice. I recommend letting it sit for a long time with pure evapo rust in it first, then back flushing it with large volume low pressure to prevent leaks. Then, I would set up the pump, backwards of course, and run it with a heater like Matt till the fluid stays clean. 
 

Looking forward to hearing and seeing more of you car........just from the pump and chains it makes my “cool car” list. 👍

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Ok, I have to admit, I have never seen or heard of Bush’s car........looked it up, and presto......it’s related to a Stutz verticals eight engine design.......which from the quality of the water pump set up above makes sense. Cars were built 1898 to 1927, and it became part of Minerva. Two thumbs up 👍 👍 for a interesting and well made car I have never even heard of before...........go easy on that radiator......looks like it’s expensive to have to make a new core.

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I don't want to sidetrack Matt's thread too much, but thanks Ed, for the thumbs up on the Metallurgique. It's certainly an interesting device. Unfortunately computer is not my native tongue. Also the interesting parts of the build are mostly done. Perhaps I'll think about a basic thread. This site keeps me out of the workshop too much already.

 

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Well, before I get too self-congratulatory about my little water jacket cleaning system, I decided that I'd try reversing the hoses. What could it hurt and maybe it'll reach some different nooks and crannies.

 

The result was totally unexpected and I still don't quite know why.

 

I connected the blue hoses from the pump to the fittings on the sides of the block, and the clear outlet tubes coming off the heads used the red hoses to drain back into the bucket. This is the direction coolant flows through the engine in operation. With everything in place, I turned on the pump... and watched it almost completely drain the 5-gallon bucket. Eventually a small trickle  came out the water outlets but it wasn't nearly enough to fill the tubes like before. Eventually it stabilized with perhaps four gallons of Evapo-Rust in the engine and maybe a gallon (or less) still in the bucket--that's exactly the opposite of the way it was running before. In fact, there wasn't enough Evapo-Rust in the bucket to submerge the heater, which started to smoke so I disconnected it and removed it.

 

1469606667_2020-02-0316_57_27.thumb.jpg.fe4b99119e38b9a84b36bf15a1772cc0.jpg
Running in the opposite direction, the blocks filled with Evapo-Rust

but the output was pretty tepid. The system is running, but you can
see there's not enough flow to fill the outlet tubes. Odd...

 

644970592_2020-02-0316_48_04.thumb.jpg.6e977cb556fbbe14bab5ca5f2cc8a558.jpg
It also rapidly drained the 5-gallon bucket, leaving
just enough to keep the nozzles submerged.
That's the opposite of before. Where'd it all go?

 

Even more strange was when I tried to fill the outlet tubes by closing off one of the valves so the pump's output was going exclusively to one side of the engine. My theory was that at full power, that pump should move plenty of liquid through one side and just gravity would not be able to drain it at an equal rate. But it actually had the effect of filling the other side instead. Huh? 

 

So what's going on? I spent quite a bit of time looking at the system and noted that the Evapo-Rust that was visible in the clear outlet tubes was aerated, but it was also running down the sides of the tubes as liquid. That meant it wasn't foaming in the block, but rather it was flowing out with some amount of force that was causing it to cavitate when it hit the fitting at the bottom of the tube. OK, that makes sense, as the input side is only a 1/2-inch hose while the outlet is a 1.5-inch tube. The pump couldn't possibly move enough liquid through the small hose to fill the engine as well as that tube--physics doesn't work that way. But what about diverting it to one side but it was the other that side filled up? I don't really have a good answer, but I suspect that was simply drainage. Still, I don't know why it wouldn't drain that fast with the pump working. Very weird.

 

79969458_2020-02-0316_48_00.thumb.jpg.cd870ed9ad83a12da8086db67d17f86b.jpg
Evapo-Rust clearly flowing out of the water
neck with some velocity...

 

1588011676_2020-02-0316_47_48.thumb.jpg.398e9021278d545233642cefe3b5810b.jpg
...And then hitting the bottom and foaming up.

 

After my initial frustration, I realized all this was probably a good thing. The fact that the bucket was nearly empty meant that A LOT more Evapo-Rust was actually in the engine doing some work. That also meant that for the last two weeks that it has been running, it has likely never reached all the upper areas of the water jacket. It was running through the heads and water jacket too fast and since I was throttling the pump to prevent cavitation, it was draining faster than it was filling. As a result, only about a gallon was circulating at a time and probably only to the lower areas of the front of the block. The upper areas of the water jacket were probably untouched (I don't really want to take it apart for an autopsy but I'm confident in this theory). 

 

I'm glad it reversed it because this showed me that my initial setup wasn't getting the job done. Even now with more Evapo-Rust working inside the engine, I'm afraid it's not quite filling the water jackets fully. My solution will be to get two more valves and use them to close off the drain hoses so they're smaller than the input hoses. That should build some pressure in the block and force the Evapo-Rust into every nook and cranny, and maybe even filling the clear outlet tubes fully so I can watch what's going on. Then I'll know that the block is completely filled. 

 

So tomorrow I'll get some valves, I'll add some extra Evapo-Rust to the bucket (which means I'll have to devise a way to catch the overflow when I turn it off because there will be 7 gallons moving through the system but only a 5-gallon bucket to catch it), and turn it back on and let it run for another week. I bet we see the Evapo-Rust turn really dark, really fast this time...

 

Sometimes it pays to just poke around and see what happens.

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I wonder if the bucket had been higher than the engine if it wouldn't have filled the engine better the first time just thinking that gravity alone would fill the block and since air rises it would work it's way out better, of course the pump helps speed that up as well.  I hadn't thought of that until you mentioned it wasn't getting completely filled.  Of course too late and you figured a solution but for someone else doing this set up (could even be me on my new project if I have to pull the engine) I might try elevating the bucket as well.  Can't hurt. 

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Matt......maybe flush only one block at a time. The heat and flow should be better, and that way there won’t be any possible way that you end up with air pockets. 
 

I’m Intrested to hear on the bolt removal process.......how many heli coils will you end up installing? New bolts should be made of correct material, and also were there issues with the bolts binding to the heads. I am not sure I would bump compression up too much, and certainly wouldn’t do it by milling the heads.........I would just clean up the heads to be sure they are flat, and not pitted around the coolant holes. I would surface the blocks. Also do NOT install “hardened valve seats” an unnecessary risk of damage to the block, valve guide alignment issues, and seats falling out as you drive down the road. Will you use new pistons, valves, springs, ect? Or just do a rebuild replacing only mandatory worn parts? Modern pistons and ring packages make starting much easier, less oil burn, and you can play with compression without altering the heads or blocks. Timing chains available? Ernie Foster was my go to phone call on Lincoln stuff along with Jack Passy. Now I don’t know anyone who regularly does 30’s Lincoln engine builds anymore.

 

I will have a bunch other questions and comments as things go along. Looking forward to seeing it run.

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Installed valves on the drain side and it worked as expected--I was able to control the flow and fill the blocks completely. Almost all five gallons were sucked into the block, so I just stuck the drains into the second bucket along with the pickup tube. As long as the pump is running, five gallons will be in the block with five gallons in the bucket. It should keep circulating under a few pounds of pressure, so the Evapo-Rust will reach every corner of the water jacket. With five gallons in the bucket, I was also able to hook up the heater to warm it up, although with twice the liquid to heat, it stabilized around 120 degrees instead of the previous 150, which I think is OK. The other nice thing about having valves on both the pump side and drain side is that I can close them all and trap the Evapo-Rust in the block and let it soak even when the pump isn't running. All good--we'll let it circulate for another week or two.

 

1 hour ago, edinmass said:

how many heli coils will you end up installing?

 

I actually used Time-Serts instead of helicoils, which I don't trust. Same concept, but the Time-Serts have a better torque rating. I ended up installing about 13 of them, either because I didn't quite drill out the bolts perfectly or the threads in the block were eroded a bit more than I would have liked. If any of them looked ragged, I replaced them.

 

timekit.jpg.6de4d5427488748f03adac8c79e0a503.jpg
Time-Sert kit comes with all the tools and 10 inserts. Expensive at
about $70 for the kit, but worth it for ease of use and strength.

 

step2.jpg.2a0d4243930adede3fb25818e193cf16.jpg
Step 1 is to drill out the hole to the size of the Time-Sert using the
included drill bit. 

 

029-flathead-tech-cutter-tool.thumb.jpg.be50ca08798a9f86d0b1f08ac06d1dbf.jpg
Step 2: Use the included tool to cut a shoulder around the bolt hole.
The tool is self-aligning and stops automatically at the proper depth.

 

step4.jpg.b6bffb7380233baf377aae0e48e5bfbb.jpg

Step 3: Use the included tap to tap the hole to hold the Time-Sert.

 

032-flathead-tech-time-sert-install.thumb.jpg.0d71a27273e81481f1808b96fec8e120.jpg  033-flathead-tech-time-sert-spreader-tap.thumb.jpg.ce7a66daec3f51a7a7d077cbe38e47d4.jpg
Step 4: Use the special tool to screw the Time-Sert into the hole. I use a drop of red Loc-Tite to hold
it in place, which the instructions recommend. I also use a dab of oil on the threads of the tool
to make it easier to back the tool out once the threads are set. The tool actually flares the insert
at the bottom and locks it into place using an interference fit--it's not merely screwed in.

 

034-flathead-tech-time-sert-installed.thumb.jpg.a2bbd062625e1cbb542243ff35e90681.jpg
And finished. The 7/16-14 Time-Serts are rated to 140 lb-ft. of 

torque, but the Lincoln heads are torqued to only 50 lb-ft. so they

should be plenty strong and completely permanent. 

 

1 hour ago, edinmass said:

New bolts should be made of correct material, and also were there issues with the bolts binding to the heads.

 

I'm still shopping for the right studs. There are off-the-shelf studs that are relatively affordable (about $2.00 each--remember that I need 58 of them) and available in a variety of lengths. Then there are the ARP studs that are gorgeous but cost about $600 for 58 of them. Yeah, no kidding. The nice thing is that the Lincoln V12 uses the same size studs as the flathead Ford V8, so they're pretty commonly available, just expensive. There's also a guy up in Detroit who makes the exact replica studs for flathead Fords, which apparently have a slightly different thread pitch in order to eliminate the use of thread sealant in water jackets--it's just a little tighter than a standard 7/16-14. Unfortunately, they are only available in two lengths, one too short and one too long. They're not expensive, and if they're correct I'm leaning towards using them and just trimming them to fit. Again, the torque is only going to be 50-55 lb-ft. so ARP studs are overkill.

 

1 hour ago, edinmass said:

I am not sure I would bump compression up too much, and certainly wouldn’t do it by milling the heads.........I would just clean up the heads to be sure they are flat, and not pitted around the coolant holes.

 

That's the plan. Nothing drastic, just make them flat. 

 

1 hour ago, edinmass said:

Also do NOT install “hardened valve seats” an unnecessary risk of damage to the block, valve guide alignment issues, and seats falling out as you drive down the road. Will you use new pistons, valves, springs, ect? Or just do a rebuild replacing only mandatory worn parts? Modern pistons and ring packages make starting much easier, less oil burn, and you can play with compression without altering the heads or blocks.

 

The long block is still fully assembled--that was the idea behind stitching the block--no heat, no disassembly. If I was going to do a full rebuild, I wouldn't have bothered and would have just bought an undamaged block. But since Dale Adams and Frank Seme each quoted me "about $30,000" for an engine rebuild, I decided to see if it could be salvaged. Besides, it has been rebuilt at some point--there are .030 pistons in it already.

 

Block6.thumb.jpg.cf88585004ed9234d6c8b29fa2a6ebf7.jpg
Circle shows piston with .030 marking (arrow is the crack
in the block that was stitched).

 

The plan is to clean everything thoroughly, pull the main caps and check clearances and condition, lap the valves, and reassemble. Tearing it down beyond the point I already have will get expensive and the only way this works is if I don't spend 90% of the car's value rebuilding the engine. There's no reason to suspect anything is amiss in the bottom end--it made good oil pressure and did run quite well that one time I drove it. I am going to have a look at the timing chain, but that will have to come later when I can remove the front cover, which also doubles as the front engine mounts. Timing chains are available for about $700--yikes! I don't know about gears, probably have to find one NOS if I need it. But freshening the engine partially assembled is the only way the car doesn't become scrap. 

Edited by Matt Harwood (see edit history)
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I am just now catching up reading this from about Jan. 28th until now. THANK YOU for taking the time to contribute - all of you. It will save a lot of experimentation by many of us now and in the future. This sharing of experiences, trials, experiments etc is a benefit to any and all no matter how many cylinders your have to deal with . Take a moment to think of the "pre computer internet" era and how communication was by phone, or hand written letter.

The sharing of how to fix or restore something , what fluids, parts etc. to use can be compared to someone who shares information or period images and photos so we all can not only appreciate what was done 80+ years ago but now look at what was done then to make our projects turn out the way they were designed - look the way they did etc. We are a community of preservationists WORLDWIDE, it is our common bond, our passion. To paraphrase an author I read many decades ago - Fellow squirrels we are doing well.

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Matt........I didn’t understand you were leaving the lower end intact. I understand you choice. Looks like the studs will work out fine.......sure is a lot of them............best, Ed.

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Probably not a real issue, but when you increase the pressure and distribution of the evaporust in the engine, are you confident none of it can get past a gasket?  Don't want any in the cylinders or elsewhere.  

 

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31 minutes ago, Zimm63 said:

Probably not a real issue, but when you increase the pressure and distribution of the evaporust in the engine, are you confident none of it can get past a gasket?  Don't want any in the cylinders or elsewhere.  

 

 

I did think about that. At the moment, there's a pinhole leak on one of the water outlets bolted to the head where it's spraying all over the place when the pump's running. I'm not actually using any gaskets, just a little plumber's putty to seal it up. I'll make a cork gasket and that should seal it. There's no oil in the crankcase and the drain plug is out, so if it's getting into the cylinders or leaking into the bottom end, it shouldn't hurt anything and I'll be able to spot it. Right now, it's dry. Besides we're still going to pull the pan, check bearings, re-lube everything, and pre-pressurize the oil system before we reinstall it in the car (there are fittings on the side of the block for an oil cooler, so I figured I'd just use a similar pump setup to run some oil through it for a while to clean everything out). So even if Evpo-Rust is getting into the cylinders or crankcase, it won't do any harm and we'll get it all out before we fire the engine the first time. No worries!

 

The current pressure is pretty slight, I'd say no more than 2-3 PSI, but I think it's more important to force the Evapo-Rust into all the nooks and crannies and let it leak a bit rather than dial it back and risk rust pockets. I only have one chance to get this right--once the engine is back in the car, it'll be VERY hard to clean it out again. I'd rather fuss with it now and deal with leaks rather than worry that I didn't get the job done when I had the chance.

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This is very curious--the Evapo-Rust is most definitely working. Here's a photo I took ten minutes ago as I walked past the rig buzzing away back in the shop:

 

20200206_125728.thumb.jpg.6ac229859c2ac602f2ca0a0797775dec.jpg

 

One side is notably darker than the other, despite pulling from the same bucket and recirculating at the same rate and dumping back into that same bucket. That says to me that the Evapo-Rust is doing a lot more work on the driver's side engine bank, and doing it quickly. It kind of confirms my theory that it wasn't fully circulating before but now that I have some pressure in the system, it's reaching all the nooks and crannies. The passenger's side bank appears to already be pretty clean and therefore the Evapo-Rust isn't doing as much de-rusting, so perhaps it was doing a better job on that side in previous iterations. I did pull off the side fitting on that side of the block because it was leaking and used a flashlight to look inside. There was the usual greasy black coating that the Evapo-Rust leaves, but there was also quite a bit of bright silver/gray cast iron. It's definitely getting clean. Wish I had taken a photo, but this is good news!

 

I think once I'm convinced that it's clean in there, I'll run some kind of detergent through it for a few days as a rinse to get that black coating cleaned out. Still, it's kind of neat to see how this stuff works and have conclusive evidence that we're making progress...

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On my '41 Buick Limited, I built a set of headers to replace the cracked exhaust manifolds. Since the tubular headers don't move around like the cast iron manifolds, I was able to use Remflex gaskets to seal it up. I've used them before in performance applications when I was racing, and I was always impressed. They're considerably thicker than standard gaskets, they're made of graphite so they don't burn or smell, and they don't delaminate like most composite gaskets like the copper clad ones that I had used previously on the Limited. I would like to use them on the Lincoln as well, even though the copper gaskets from Olson's are lovely. I'm going to send these to Remflex and ask them to duplicate them--for $250 I get 10 sets and they'll have the Lincoln V12 gaskets in their inventory. The copper gaskets look far better than the junk I removed during disassembly, but I'm confident that the Remflex gaskets will be superior. I'll also have them make a collector gasket and gaskets for the Y-pipe that connects the manifolds.

 

2020647431_2018-12-1815_25_14.thumb.jpg.9e93929270505f964d9ab80ecd4965fc.jpg
Lincoln intake/exhaust gaskets aren't complicated but the gaskets on the
car when I got it were pretty crappy. Nevertheless, it had zero exhaust leaks.

 

373418502_2020-02-0815_54_52.thumb.jpg.aeb5de2ffb22581fe8f067675936a8f7.jpg
New gaskets from Olson's are lovely copper-clad pieces, but
I still think the Remflex gaskets will work better. 

 

13-009-2.jpg?v-cache=1403003861
Remflex gaskets for my straight-8 Buick were just awesome.

 

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After you have done the detergent, I think I'd run a strong solution of distilled water and water soluble oil through the system, hopefully to prevent any rust being generated before you are able to fill the system. Fortunately, cast iron is naturally rust resistant...it does not rust nearly as quickly or as deeply as steel. The main reason we have these problems is that the system is wet all the time so something to inhibit rust is always a good idea.

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On 2/6/2020 at 7:01 PM, alsancle said:

The Evapo-Rust is a miracle cure.   

 

 

Matt......please post some photos of the internals after you rinse it out..........to be honest, when I have run evapo  rust in my cars for several months, after draining, I just flush with water and then add antifreeze. 

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