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The Car Which Shall Not Be Named III


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I have been very reluctant to share anything about this accursed car given how badly it has gone in the past. Some of you surely remember those threads and may also be thinking, "Oh, God, not this nonsense again," and that's totally fair. My ownership of this car has been nothing if not tumultuous and this will be the third thread in which I've attempted to share some of the work I'm doing on it. Is it a mistake? Maybe. People seemed to like to take pleasure in taking pot-shots at my misery and given that my skin was worn pretty thin by the whole thing, I did not react with kindness. Jerks beget jerks, and all that.

 

Nevertheless, my motivations remain sincere: One, I won't ever forget my friend AJ saying that even threads full of failure are useful because they show others that even people with significant resources can experience setbacks and frustrations (or perhaps showing that the purpose of my life is only to serve as a warning to others). Two, as I mentioned to someone just today, project threads like these are an excellent source of real, hands-on information and problem-solving that isn't always available in other areas unless someone specifically asks about that very thing. And three, I really do enjoy writing about working on cars and find it therapeutic--the promise of sharing what I've done often gets me out in the shop to do things that I can share, and I suppose that's good for my sanity.

 

So, to bring everyone up to speed, I bought this 1935 Lincoln K almost two years ago and it has been a never-ending source of misery ever since.

 

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Some of it was related to the fact that expectations were not properly managed (I did not set out to buy a project car, I set out to buy a new tour car that just needed some tires), and some of it was related to the fact that the "project" part turned out to be a far more significant job than anyone expected. In short, every time I fixed something on the car, the thing next to it broke, up to and including a hole in the side of the block that was a total surprise to everyone except perhaps the guy who smeared JB Weld over it to hide it. It totally broke me. I gave up. Ultimately, I pushed it into a corner of the shop, covered it up, and walked away planning never to look at it again. Whomever moved into our building at some distant point in the future after we're gone would get a 4800-pound bonus. That was my plan.

 

 

 

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Shortly after that, my lovely wife, Melanie, quietly made arrangements to dispose of the various parts of the car, such as it was. Being in the car business, she used some of our contacts and found a buyer for it. She didn't tell me about it, she just quietly made a deal. However, when that person showed up with his trailer one Saturday afternoon, he was displeased--even though Melanie clearly told him the car was in pieces, he somehow expected that we would put it back together for him and sell it to him for roughly 15% of what I paid to own it. Yeah, some doofus expected a running, driving Lincoln K for $7500--if I was going to do all the work to make it run, I was going to keep the stupid car. I guess it goes without saying that he left without a Lincoln. Melanie apparently had a few other inquiries, but it seems that a disassembled Lincoln K sedan is something nobody wants at virtually any price. One fellow even offered to take it off our hands (for free) if we'd pay to ship all the parts to him. It seems that word of my duress had spread far and wide and there was no shortage of dipshiats looking to take advantage of it.

 

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When I told Melanie I was going to crush it instead, she was OK with that idea. But I should also mention that she wisely pointed out that the money is still gone and the car is still here. Crushing it might bring a perverse kind of satisfaction, but it would be momentary. It wouldn't fix my crippled enjoyment of the hobby and the opportunity that the car represents would be lost. She didn't care, do whatever you want, but it started to sink in that maybe I could turn my hate and resentment into something positive. I decided that I would beat the car by fixing it.

 

Or at least that's what I'm currently telling myself. 

 

To sum up: bought this car and wiped out my savings, car crapped itself with a hole in the block, eventually got the hole fixed but since that involved removing the engine and disassembling most of it, the car is now in pieces. My constant disappointment and frustration with the car has caused me a great deal of pain and stress. Nevertheless, I have decided to fix it, if only to prove that I'm stupid but not crazy. 


Tasks that have been done so far:

  • All-new fuel system, including fresh gas tank, lines, electric and mechanical fuel pumps, and rebuilt carburetor
  • All-new starting system, including batteries, cables, and starter motor
  • Repairing and repainting the headlight buckets, which had been damaged multiple times in the past and were about 30% bondo at this point
  • New plugs, wires, coils, and install factory wire conduits
  • Clean out cooling system, install new hoses with restrictors to fight overflowing radiator cap, install aftermarket temperature gauge in glove box
  • Re-pack water pump
  • New fluids throughout
  • Rehab power brake booster system
  • Tuning. Lots and lots of tuning. Eventually got it to start instantly just by reaching in the window and touching the button. Hope I can duplicate it.
  • Install fog lamps

 

And after all that, we still had a hole in the block so next steps:

  • Remove front-end sheetmetal, sidemounts, and lights
  • Remove radiator, steering column, steering box
  • Remove engine, which was a pretty big job, seeing as it was installed at the factory before the body was in place
  • Build crate and stand for engine to be delivered to New England where the block would be stitched
  • Remove 58 rusty head studs. Successfully remove 16 of them. Break 42 of them. Spend seven months slowly drilling them out.
  • Build a custom engine stand to hold the giant V12

 

Most of the car sits in a corner of our shop under a cover. Parts of it are scattered throughout the building and with various subcontractors. The engine is on a stand being rehabilitated--since we did not need to fully disassemble it to repair the hole in the block, I'm hoping that the rotating assembly is OK. It has .030 oversize pistons in it already, so it has been rebuilt at some point in the past. Engine builders Frank Seme and Dale Adams both told me that rebuilding a Lincoln K V12 is a $30,000 job, so we've worked hard to keep the bottom end intact. I am still optimistic that it can be rehabilitated and will run and drive properly when I'm finished. If not, that will be a very, very bad day. Hope is indeed a dangerous thing.

 

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Anyway, I'll document my work from here. If you have questions about things I've done already, send me a private message and I'll fill you in. There's a lot of information related to this project that I've accumulated, so I'm happy to help in that regard. And if you're one of the guys who likes to gloat when a dealer gets burned, well, do that in a PM, too. 

 

That more or less brings us up to date. A lot of the work I listed up above is going to have to be re-done, so I'll do it again. And as long as the engine is out and it's all in pieces, I may as well restore it to show standards. So that's what I plan to do. Let's get started...

 

 

Edited by Matt Harwood (see edit history)
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Glad to see you have made this decision. Sorrry for all of the heartache it has caused you but I have faith you will beat it and I look forward to seeing the story here. I have become a bit of an expert on things taking longer than expected and costing a lot more than expected but nothing that, in any way, compares to your experiences with this car. 

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I am more than willing to follow this again.  You do things the right way, so you can sleep well knowing you will be teaching us all something along the way.  You will make this car grand again. 🙅‍♂️

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Glad to see you are back at the unmentioned vehicle.  Don't let it get you down, you work on it on your terms!  You are the boss, well Melanie might be.  Lol.  Enjoy the hobby!  

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When everything goes sideways – as happens often enough to me – I've always found that the best response is to put it aside, do something else and come back to it when the initial pain has subsided. I expect you will succeed in making that Lincoln a real jem.

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So with the engine on the stand and all but one of the broken studs removed from the blocks, the next step had to be getting everything in shape for the future. I made an attempt to clean out the cooling system when I first got it and the car was assembled, and actually fooled myself into thinking it was clean in there. But once it was apart and the heads were off, I could see just how bad it was. Nothing that 96% of other old cars don't have as well, but if this was going to be a healthy car that could be toured with confidence, the cooling system had to be addressed. I sent the radiator out to be re-cored and it came back looking like art--for $1800, I suppose that was mandatory. The radiator shop told me it was about 30% blocked, so that was certainly a factor in the overheating issues even though when I reverse-flushed it, nothing came out. It was simply packed too tightly. A new radiator was step one.

 

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$1800 worth of cooling system art.

 

Step two is the water pump, which has been sent out for rebuilding and an upgrade to a stainless shaft, ceramic bearing to eliminate the packing, and a fresh impeller. It should be better than new. I expect I'll have it back in the next week or two.

 

Step three is cleaning out the coolant passages in the block. The Lincoln K V12 uses composite construction--an aluminum crankcase to which the iron blocks are bolted. The water pump is mounted on the passenger's side and driven by the generator, which is driven by a chain inside the crankcase. The water pump has a built-in oil cooler. Coolant is pumped from the pump up into the blocks, with the driver's side block being fed by a tube through the crankcase--there are two large cast bronze manifolds that move the coolant from the crankcase to the blocks. None of those areas are affected by rust, of course, but the iron blocks were a mess. Since it was my intention to keep the engine as assembled as I could, I couldn't send the blocks out to be hot-tanked and cleaned, we had to do it in-house.

 

We had to just get all the loose rust out of there. Looking inside, you could see it piled up. I had some long engine cleaning bristle brushes that would scrub around in there, but the most effective tool was simply a long piece of stiff wire. I gouged and scraped to knock as much loose as possible. I used a magnet to pull out the biggest chunks, and then blasted it out with a high-pressure mini nozzle on a hose. Once I had removed as much as possible, the next step was chemically removing the rust.

 

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Pretty nasty inside. This is after a few passes with the magnet and hose.

 

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A fairly nasty slurry of rust and water came out under pressure.

 

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A lot of this trash came out. No wonder it ran hot.

 

Fortunately, there are chemicals that can do such a job rather effectively. Personally, I'm a fan of Evapo-Rust. It takes a little time but works beautifully on iron rust. I initially devised a setup with a plastic manifold for hot tubs and little plastic tubes feeding all the coolant passages in the top of the blocks where they connect to the heads. There are 54 of them. I bought a small electric pump that would push Evapo-Rust through that manifold, through the little tubes, through the blocks, and out the bottom where a pair of fittings I'd made would return the Evapo-Rust to the bucket. Well, all those little tubes were tough to seal to the blocks and sprayed Evapo-Rust all over the place. Failure.

 

The backup plan was the better plan. I reinstalled the heads using plumbers' putty to seal the coolant openings between the heads and block (I have fresh head gaskets, but why waste them?). It was just temporary and didn't have to do anything except make it water tight, so it was a good solution. I bolted down the heads lightly, installed the water necks on the front of the heads upside-down, and rigged up some hoses and tubing to feed Evapo-Rust through the water necks, into the heads, and down through the blocks. A Y-fitting with valves like you'd use on your garden hose fed the pump's output to the two water necks and I could use those valves to regulate the flow--I didn't want too much pressure, just enough to keep the stuff moving through the blocks.

 

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The current setup: bucket of Evapo-Rust feeding a small sump
pump (arrow) with a Y-fitting. Pump feeds red and blue hoses to
water pump necks installed upside-down on the heads. 
Evapo-Rust flows through the heads, down through the blocks, and
out the side fittings where the bronze manifolds are attached.
I made some crude fittings that would allow me to connect short
garden hoses that would recycle the Evapo-Rust back into the bucket.

Then I plugged it in and let it run for a week.

 

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Simple fitting, one on each side, allows blocks to drain into the bucket

to recycle the Evapo-Rust. Note the hole in the crankcase, which is

the tube that feeds the driver's side block from the passenger's side
water pump. 

 

Right now, the pump has been circulating the Evapo-Rust for a little over a week. The pump is a little noisy but it seems OK and you can see the Evapo-Rust moving along by holding a flashlight behind the clear tubing. The Y-fitting with valves was useful because the pump was aerating the Evapo-Rust, so I throttled it back a bit which keeps it liquid. At this point, I think the Evapo-Rust is almost used up, but on the other hand it hasn't gotten any darker in the last few days so maybe that means all the rust has been removed. I don't have any way of knowing without taking it apart and looking inside, which I don't want to do just yet. I may circulate a fresh bucket for a little while just to see if there's anything left to remove. We'll see...

 

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Evapo-Rust gets darker as it gets used up. I think it's almost done.

 

 

Edited by Matt Harwood (see edit history)
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You’ll get there Matt.

I’d love to tell you getting my Buick to the condition I wanted it was trouble free. The reality is my budget for the whole project got me to the about point where the quantity of disassembled pieces was at its peak. 

 

 

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And a batch of freshly blasted engine parts on their way to the powdercoater for a shot of mirror-gloss black. There are a few more parts that I need to remove and clean, including the water pump necks, but I have some work to do on those first once they're done feeding Evapo-Rust to the blocks.

 

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Matt, my 32’ Olds radiator is clogged pretty good also and doesn’t allow proper flow to the point when the motor is accelerated, it pushes out the overflow because the water can’t get down the radiator fast enough. I found an original Olds radiator recently and layed it on its side, put a tight cap on it, plugged the over flow, and put a long piece of hose on each outlet. I filled it with two bottles of evaporust and topped it up with water. I put a piece of hard flexible air tubing with tiny holes drilled in down the hose on the bottom tank until the tubing dead headed on the far side of the tank. I ran about 4lbs of air pressure through it for four days and watched as the mixture would bubble up both hoses but never enough to come out. When I dumped the mixture out it was dark brown and had many snotty looking worm like things that appeared to be congealed rust deposits. I flushed the radiator many times then using a snap-on bore scope, had a look. The radiator looks like new now and the water sloshes from top to bottom tank through the core really well though I don’t think it was that bad to begin with. I will be installing one of those Gano filters in the top hose for a while to see if it catches any more debris as I don’t want to clog this radiator. Not sure if you might want to run one of those for a while also. I will be seeing if I can clear my original radiator but I’m not too hopeful as my infrared thermometer showed no heat on two thirds of the core. 5-6” on each side are blocked solid. 

Good luck with your project and you’ll get it all worked out. On another note, I have a customers block currently getting stitched here in MA right now. He does phenomenal work.

Edited by chistech (see edit history)
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Good on you, Matt. I wish there was a way for some of us to get together to assist on the car, but it would probably end up with "too many cooks in the kitchen". Keep plugging away at it, buddy! We're with you in spirit, at least.

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I'm glad to see you back at work on this car, as painful as it may have been for you to get started again.  You have my empathy as a lot of people, including myself, have bought really nice cars, only to find out there be monsters lurking.

 

I had a short stint at a restoration shop, apprenticing as a trimmer.  My saying at the time was that any car getting ready to be restored was like a peanut.  Might look good on the outside, but one never knows for sure until the shell is off and one finds a good nut or a rotten one.

 

On the rust and crud inside the block and radiator, I'm going through a similar thing with my Cord now.  For various reasons, we're working on the car mechanically, and have much disassembled.  The car has never run hot, which amazes me, because the cooling passages were full of crud.  On a V-8 Cord, cooling water goes through the intake manifold, and even it had scaling and blockage.  It's just something out of sight so out of mind.

 

Good luck with your renewed project, and thanks for sharing.  I, for one, feel no joy at all when someone is frustrated by an old car.  The small frustrations may be part of owning an antique, but the big frustrations like yours I wish on no one.

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Owning a BIG pre war CCCA Classic with more than eight pistons is similar to having four ex wives and ten children.

 

1) It ain't cheap!

2) It ain’t easy!

3) It ain’t a lot of fun .......at times.

 

For the record.........I have never been married and don’t have any children.

 

 

Sorry for the above comments........I can’t help myself sometimes...........

 

Old cars are fantastic fun...........not because they are cars. Cars are fun because of the people we meet while driving, fixing, touring, club events, ect.  Honestly ........ALL my friends that are in my daily life have come about because of this hobby. I have GOOD friends all over the globe.........all made by attending car events. I expect to visit with friends from Norway, Canada,  Switzerland, England, and France in the next 12 months. We share food, family, and car adventures together..........all brought about by these wonderful,  enjoyable........................ terribly expensive and disappointing piles of junk we pray will hold together and not explode, burst into flames, or break down in front of 100 car club buddies. That is what we do............. when you really look at it, we are in competition with ourselves to make the car run and drive as one sees fit........to share and enjoy it with family and friends. 
 

Here is the problem with old cars...................

 

They take up lots of time......which many of us don’t have.......until we are too old to work in them anymore.......

They take up entirely too much money..........more than we can justify................

They take up too much room............

99 percent of the women in the world don’t care about them one bit........are you a lucky one percenter?

They take much too long to get right, much, much too long.

Im sure there are another 100 negative things we could come up with..............

 

 

All of the above DO NOT MATTER............because of the friendships and adventures they create along the way.

 

 

Having started off in the hobby at four years old, I see the challenges Matt has had with the Lincoln hundreds and hundreds of times. The only difference is.........will the person pull it off, and get the car fixed.........or will he run away in defeat. 
 

We now have our answer to Matt’s dilemma..........through anguish, setback, difficult learning curves, problems, headaches.........

 

To quote a favorite movie line of mine............Matt has.........

 

“Endeavored to persevere”

 

I am impressed he has pulled through.......and kept on. He has managed to pull through..........I’m impressed Matt......I know it wasn’t all “champagne and caviar on the Potomac” , but you did it. You mentally pushed through........now all that is left is fixing the car.......and it’s now easy to get to the finish line......all you really have left to do is items 1, 2, and 3! 
 

And, just for the record,  all the struggles you have got through with this car have happened to me.........

 

Seriously, I am quite sure you will fix and enjoy the car. After a few months of having it done, the sense of accomplishment will be fantastic. I look forward to touring with you while you drive the Lincoln...........All my best.  Edinmass 
 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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That looks really good but I'd drain it and start again with a fresh batch of Evapo-Rust, not because I think it will need it but because you will never be in such a good position to do it again and, if it comes out clean, you'll have the peace of mind that entails. If it doesn't, then it needed it. I've had the same idea for my blocks even though they don't seem to have much crud in them. What pump did you use?

Edited by JV Puleo (see edit history)
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Matt- I would run a new batch of Evapo Rust through the block.............and do it for a week or two if you have the time........or until the pump burns out. You can never over clean a block or radiator too much........if you can add a heat lamp or heating source it will go much faster.......and give a better result. Maybe a few heat lamps in between the blocks covered by a fire blanket and tin foil to prevent fire......

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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I have heard of putting a bucket heater in the solution so that it is hot – or at least very warm – combined with the heat lamps Ed suggests it should do a really through job.

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5 minutes ago, JV Puleo said:

That looks really good but I'd drain it and start again with a fresh batch of Evapo-Rust, not because I think it will need it but because you will never be in such a good position to do it again and, if it comes out clean, you'll have the peace of mind that entails. If it doesn't, then it needed it. I've had the same idea for my blocks even though they don't seem to have much crud in them. What pump did you use?

 

1 minute ago, edinmass said:

Matt- I would run a new batch of Evapo Rust through the block.............and do it for a week or two if you have the time........or until the pump burns out. You can never over clean a block or radiator too much........if you can add a heat lamp or heating source it will go much faster.......and give a better result. Maybe a few heat lamps in between the blocks covered by a fire blanket and tin foil to prevent fire......

 

That's excellent advice. I've long preached against cutting corners but I will also admit that doing so occasionally tugs at my wallet. You are 100% right and a $100 bucket of Evapo-Rust is a figurative drop in the bucket (no pun intended) in terms of what I'm spending on this project. That part of me hoping to save $100 needs to STFU and your comments made it go away. That is absolutely the right choice and I'll never have a better chance to get it done.

 

Besides, I plan to use this rig to clean out the Buick's block next week when I pull the radiator and water pump, so any leftover Evapo-Rust can be used there.

 

The pump is the smallest 120V pump I could find. I noticed that most of the really low-volume pumps were 12V which I didn't want, so I simply Googled "low-volume 120V pump" and came up with this one. I'll take a closer photo of it for you later. It's a cheap Chinese piece of junk that cost about $70 on Amazon, but it has been grinding along without complaint for 10 days now. I could hear it bog down a little when I partially closed the valves to prevent aeration, but it still kept going. It's rated at 330 GPH, which seems like a lot, but that boils down to 5.5 gallons a minute. That still seems like a lot, but it's pumping through two blocks simultaneously and as I said, I have it throttled at the valves so that it's running maybe 60% of that rate.

 

I can watch the flow through the clear tubing and it's moving pretty well but not so fast as to create pressure in the block or foam in the lines. I originally had two radiator hoses but one split so the clear hose was a quick and dirty replacement; now I realize that I should have used clear tubing on both sides but I didn't feel like tearing it apart. The drain hoses are larger than the feed hoses, which are for a washing machine--hence the red and blue--so that helps prevent pressure build-up inside the block. However, there's still enough pressure coming out of the drain hoses that I know it is filling the water jackets completely--it's not just running through to the lowest point, there's definitely some pressure in there.

 

1761504625_2020-01-1916_43_39.thumb.jpg.12c7dead60fe14c4dfb995ad2b2ab160.jpg  716166860_2020-01-1916_43_54.thumb.jpg.c9fc0d19ff1ca341621824b09490b308.jpg  563518577_2020-01-1916_44_10.thumb.jpg.4e273d721b32ca646c529b9c1cc87a73.jpg

This is when I first fired it up. The Evapo-Rust aerated and there was a lot of foam in the bucket.

You can see the Y-fitting with valves in the second photo; it's from the Home Depot garden dept.

The pump just hangs on the stand by its handle and I made a hook for the bucket, so the whole
rig moves around without having to disconnect anything but the power cord.

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Lesson learned.........the hardest way is usually the best way. Both short and long term. Your 99 percent of the way there.......now all you need is time. It will come out fine........looking forward to hanging on you rear bumper with my V-12 Pierce on a long mountain grade......we can test the cooling system and your horse power at the same time.........👍

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6 minutes ago, edinmass said:

Lesson learned.........the hardest way is usually the best way. Both short and long term. Your 99 percent of the way there.......now all you need is time. It will come out fine........looking forward to hanging on you rear bumper with my V-12 Pierce on a long mountain grade......we can test the cooling system and your horse power at the same time.........👍

 

Well, there's a bump in compression and a Gear Vendors overdrive on the menu--nobody is more curious than I to see how it actually runs. I only got to drive it once!

 

And I still need a set of 17-inch trim rings so I can run blackwalls. Have any? They don't seem to exist anymore.

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15 minutes ago, JV Puleo said:

I have heard of putting a bucket heater in the solution so that it is hot – or at least very warm – combined with the heat lamps Ed suggests it should do a really through job.

 

Good thought. I just ordered this to heat up the solution.

 

71gPOBkH-PL._SL1500_.jpg

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Matt- Lincoln trim tings are different than the Packard and Pierce wheels in 32 & 33. If they are the same on later cars I might know where a set of Bill Hirsch reproduction rings from the 80’s are. 

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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I noticed with evaporust as well the freshest stuff works best and in the fastest time,  while the not so fresh stuff still works good it seems to take twice as long and that clean time takes longer with each step down the ladder. 

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We usually use the semi used stuff to dump in a radiator for a few months before we actually try and flush or clean it, then we use the new stuff for a month or two, turning it each day. Getting ahead of a project really helps out if you can do it.

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Matt, I'm very glad to see you back here and standing up to this project and I will be following closely this time as I did the last two. Like most others here I have had my share of frustrating and expensive car related challenges and as you know some of mine had me swear off prewar cars for a while until recently. There will always be plenty of jerks that will revel in other people's adversity and unfortunately your larger online presence could magnify that. Just scroll on by them and keep moving on at a pace that is comfortable, there are far more supporters here than jerks. I love following your projects because you present them very well and come up with solutions to problems that are useful to everyone, keep it up.

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Matt,

 

Great to see you back on this project! A few years ago, I had a similar expensive issue with my 1912 McLaughlin Buick I hope to get to Hershey this year. It blew the ring and pinion on tour in Defiance, Ohio. After long discussions with Clay Green and others, I send the rear end to him and ordered a new ring and pinion from a company in Michigan. It cost about $2000 which was no big deal and expected. Unfortunately, that turned out to be the cheap part of the project as the whole rear end guts were trash I have more in the rear end than I paid for the car. My wife reminds me of this when she wants to spend money on something. 

 

Tom

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Matt,

 

I am glad your hitting this with 100% effort and I greatly enjoyed your intro for this Part III. 

 

Its going to be a long road and as you know other ugly problems will crop-up but with the 

attitude you have right now I am sure you will overcome them. As others have said - when the going gets

rough that's the time to set it aside. for a bit. As anxious as we are to see you defeat the demon within that

beast we can always wait a bit. Besides it builds suspense!

 

The stitching on the block came out fantastic! That's the way it should be done! Minimal tear-down and intrusion while

maintaining the stability of the block (i.e. not introducing internal stresses from brazing or welding) I have a very large (5 gallon) cast

aluminum oil pan that back in the day smacked down on a cross-member when a motor mount failed. It has a crude but very

effective backwoods repair. I am thinking stitching may be the way to go - especially when I see results like yours.

 

Looking forward to the next installment.

 

Terry

 

 

 

 

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Matt, what you're in the middle of is what us engineers used to call "an interesting sequence of developmental challenges".  You'll overcome them....

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Matt,

I too am glad to see that you're attacking the monster. Don't let it win!

You've certainly got the knowledge, experience and dedication to bring this one home.
 

 

 

 

 

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trimacar posted: "My saying at the time was that any car getting ready to be restored was like a peanut.  Might look good on the outside, but one never knows for sure until the shell is off and one finds a good nut or a rotten one."

 

I like the peanut analogy.

 

I always say these projects are like icebergs; what you can see wrong is only about 10% of what's really there.

At least, that's been my experience in this crazy hobby.

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Matt,

Great news and I will watching to see your progress. You are doing things the right way and your hard work will be rewarded! Edsel Ford would be proud.

Best regards,

Lew Bachman

1957 T-Bird Colonial White

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Great to see you back on the car Matt, I held out hope that would happen.  You're right to want to crush it but you're also right to resume now and get it fixed.  I think most of us have been there and felt it and we'll support you whatever you do.  Over the years I've found that dragging my shortcomings out in to the glaring bright light seems to help them go away more than trying to keep them hidden in the shadows. :)

 

 

 

 

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Hello Matt

I know from experience that ownership of some cars are rather character building, and still own a vintage Sunbeam that is in disgrace for having a major fail every other use. It is over ten years and I still haven't gone back to fix the engine.

To top it all off the replacement Riley was just the same. It took three years but I wasn't going to be beaten. It is an inanimate object so it can be cured.

I shall be watching your progress with interest, very few of these cars in Australia, if any.

Good luck.

Matthew

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11 hours ago, edinmass said:

Matt- I would run a new batch of Evapo Rust through the block.............and do it for a week or two if you have the time........or until the pump burns out. You can never over clean a block or radiator too much........if you can add a heat lamp or heating source it will go much faster.......and give a better result. Maybe a few heat lamps in between the blocks covered by a fire blanket and tin foil to prevent fire......

 

I'm on board with this.   That stuff is magic.

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12 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

The pump is the smallest 120V pump I could find. I noticed that most of the really low-volume pumps were 12V which I didn't want, so I simply Googled "low-volume 120V pump" and came up with this one. I'll take a closer photo of it for you later. It's a cheap Chinese piece of junk that cost about $70 on Amazon, but it has been grinding along without complaint for 10 days now. I could hear it bog down a little when I partially closed the valves to prevent aeration, but it still kept going. It's rated at 330 GPH, which seems like a lot, but that boils down to 5.5 gallons a minute. That still seems like a lot, but it's pumping through two blocks simultaneously and as I said, I have it throttled at the valves so that it's running maybe 60% of that rate.

The noise you can hear is probably cavitation.  A little pump like that will not have much lift (suction) capacity.

Pumps work better from the bottom of a tank with a flooded suction/inlet

330 GPH is with a little head/discharge pressure. MaxHead is 39ft at a very low flow

[industrial plant piping mechanical engineering hat off]

 

But its working so all is good

 

We all hope the car that shall not be named gets back on the road

And you still have some $$ to fill the tank

Edited by 1939_Buick (see edit history)
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Matt

 

This is great news! I really appreciated reading about your previous attempts, even though its clear they came at no small  personal cost to you.

As others have mentioned, Its no small feat to both do the work and then post about it and ,on top of it , post in such a clear well written manner.

You've already provided a great idea and received from great feedback on the 'Evapo- Pump' that others including myself might benefit from. If I have a criticism, posts like this are why I spend way too much time on this forum!

Hoping Part III has a happy ending and thanks for inviting us all on the ride again.

Keep it coming please!

 

Brad

 

BTW I don't know how anyone who has read your content and followed your participation on this forum could wish you ill will because you are a vintage car dealer. I think you happen to be one of the best ambassadors/ spokesmen that business could have.

I'd buy a car from you in heart beat.....if only my wife would let me😁

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