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The Car Which Shall Not Be Named III (1935 Lincoln K)


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Matt,

 

My only question is, Will the heat for the powder coating application be too hot for your solder joint? I would ask your powder coater about that. It might be best to just paint that one, but your powder coater should know for sure. 

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I made a similar fitting to cut into the hose on a big Hercules YXC2. I soft soldered it and its holding well. I machined a seat to match the sealing ring on the probe and its been leak free with no need for sealant etc. They use to have kits where you would punch a hole in the hose and there was a backer plate that went inside the hose that the probe screwed into.

 

IMG_0567.JPG.d3b0a0919bf1b4860f07f453d8da5712.JPG

 

Fitting.jpg.bc288189ec9d23002e56d6c0396bff53.jpg

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Posted (edited)

Surprisingly easy work tonight. First, I sandblasted the water distribution tube in preparation for powdercoating (@MCHinson I believe it should survive since the powder cures at 350-400 degrees while silver solder doesn't melt until close to 600, but I'll be sure to ask). I also removed the guts of the air cleaner, which consists of some jute packed into the center and some copper mesh held around the perimeter with a kind of chicken wire. I pulled it all out so they powder wouldn't clog it all up. I've got some ideas for how to replace it once it's done.

 

Then there was the float for the oil level gauge. I expected this to be challenging but it was so easy that I was done before I really even started. Since the cork was not an option, I bought a brass Model A Zenith carburetor float, which is about the right size and shape to work. It was also cheap and available overnight from Snyder's.

 

5-5-21-3.jpg.8d78470d4954667062ea79f539212088.jpg  5-5-21-2.jpg.a42ddb237965958901db681cb94edaf9.jpg
Model A Zenith carb float is just about the right size and shape.

 

Then I took the original wire, which has two little discs soldered in place to hold the cork, and snipped it off below the top disc.

 

5-5-21-5.jpg.6237861338ad46b7297777a286445fbd.jpg
I cut the original wire here so that the new float would

be at about the same level as the old cork.

 

Then I de-soldered the bracket on top of the float, which literally took three seconds of waving the torch over the joint. It practically jumped off. There was a nice little dimple in the middle and a puddle of solder, so I smeared some flux around the surface and positioned the wire and disc right in the middle. I supported it with a little clip, then hit it with the torch until the solder was liquid. It seemed to grab pretty well but just in case, I added some extra solder to help secure it. It's solid and should have no problems holding once it's in the oil pan. I'm shocked how easy it was--I figured the solder would fight me or the wire would fall apart or something. Nothing's ever this easy, right? I'll take it.

 

5-5-21-4.jpg.6764b9adc7978973942f951e6582bb6f.jpg  5-5-21-1.jpg.798624440883106dd8f40068065448bd.jpg
Original wire soldered to the new float. Shockingly easy!

 

Then I went home and had dinner with my family. They're supportive of the project, of course, but it was nice to hang out with my kids for a change...

 

 

Edited by Matt Harwood (see edit history)
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Posted (edited)

Matt.......all my ideas are easy. 😎
 

Be sure to place the float in 200 degree water and hold it under looking for air bubbles......

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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Posted (edited)

Still raining so I installed the oil pan tonight. Turns out, it's a pretty big job on the Lincoln K. There's that screen that fits between the crankcase and the pan so you're essentially making a sandwich with two oil pan gaskets and somehow holding it all in place can be a challenge. I didn't take many photos since my hands were busy, but I cleaned the mounting flanges the applied a very light layer of grease on the engine and pan, and a thin coating of gray Permatex #2 on both sides of the screen. If I need to take it apart, I want it to separate from the block and pan easily and hopefully not damage the gasket.

 

5-6-21-2.jpg.dfb005e21db870774a789fee04816a20.jpg

Cork gasket stuck to the screen with a

very light layer of Permatex #2.

 

Once I had the screen up in place, I had to install the oil pump pickup tube, so I packed the oil pump with Vaseline to help it prime (whether that works or now is hard to say but I've always done it) and then installed the pickup. I also fed the oil level float through the screen and up through the crankcase where I held it in place with an alligator clip. Then I carefully installed the second gasket and the oil pan itself. I used new stainless lock washers and the original nuts, which I torqued to 20 ft-lb.; that's plenty to hold an oil pan in place and should not crush or damage the gasket. Of note, the K V12 doesn't use a rear main seal so it was relatively easy to seal it up, but I added a dab of Permatex on the joints between the bellhousing lower inspection cover and the crankcase in back and the front cover and crankcase. I hope it doesn't leak.

 

5-6-21-1.jpg.5b12080443588cdf25d0d2acdf452d05.jpg

Oil pan installed. Looks good!

 

I released the alligator clamp and the float dropped to the bottom of the pan. On the gauge, that is about right--it shows DANGER with nothing in the pan, so it should read fairly accurately once it's full of oil.

 

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Oil level gauge should be accurate once I find a red

ball to install on the end of it.

 

 

Edited by Matt Harwood (see edit history)
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Meanwhile, in the background I have a bunch of little projects going on. My speedometer was broken when I got the car, so I had John Wolf rebuild it. But whatever broke in the head unit damaged the cable. I've been desperately searching for a replacement cable, but the drive end uses a slotted fitting instead of the usual square drive. Two different speedometer shops looked at the parts and said they couldn't help--they'd never seen anything like it.

 

1935_Lincoln_Gauge_End.jpg.f7ec6e0e622d43a52628efbfe366294b.jpg

Speedometer end uses a standard square drive but is

obviously buggered.

 

1935_Lincoln_Speedo_Drive_1.jpg.c231ab7fb0f97258d5f63f708966a694.jpg

The drive unit on the transmission uses a slotted fitting.

 

Obviously someone can fix/make these cables but I'm striking out. Doing some digging on the internet, I somehow stumbled on a Model T supplier who sells a speedometer cable with what is called "Stewart" ends (presumably for Stewart-Warner). And sure enough, the Stewart end sure looks like the transmission end of the Lincoln's cable.

 

SpeedometerCable1.jpg.23af4c18d3492598ea3e01fd6e459ae5.jpg

Stewart end and bushing sure look like they'll fit

the Lincoln.

 

SpeedometerCable3.jpg.afa4f3fb869bb7cf4eed835b251a8c0a.jpg

But the speedometer end is round, not square.

 

SpeedometerCable2.jpg.1088b97ec23b6c44b49d801f402ffbf8.jpg

I have a regular cable with a square end and this square

adapter that I could swedge onto the round cable.

But will it fit in the cable so it can be secured to the 

back of the speedometer?

 

The rub is that the speedometer end of this cable is round, not square. So I either need to install a square drive adapter or install the Stewart drive on a standard cable. I have one of each right now and both have unfinished ends. I'm leaning towards putting the Stewart end on the standard cable and trying to save the Lincoln's original cable housing. So that's another project I'll have to tackle here in the next few weeks. 


Any thoughts on how to approach this?

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Matt...... everybody knows what a pain in the ass I am. They are right. Minus three points for the modern hardware.........tisk, tisk, tisk. 🤯

 

Yup......I can’t help myself!

41892246-6178-4546-971B-461476C43963.png

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That's the original bolt, yo!

 

Every bolt on the car has that same logo. Unless someone changed them all out whenever it was rebuilt last, I'm pretty sure that's OEM.

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Posted (edited)
14 minutes ago, Matt Harwood said:

That's the original bolt, yo!

 

Every bolt on the car has that same logo. Unless someone changed them all out whenever it was rebuilt last, I'm pretty sure that's OEM.


 

If that factory, I’m buying lunch at the Lodge for you at Pebble Beach. 😎
 

Can’t wait to see others chime in......photos from others required for me to pay out.

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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I have seen round speedometer cables that simply had the end soldered or brazed and then ground into a square to fit in the speedometer. That might be an option if you can't find a shop that can make a square cable end for you.   

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Posted (edited)

I'm pretty sure I'll be able to make my own speedometer cable to work in this car. I went out and removed the speedometer drive gearbox from the transmission and found the disconnected end of the cable tucked under the car and tied with some string. The end is broken off but the sheath seems to be intact. 

 

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Speedometer cable end at the transmission.

 

1935_Lincoln_Speedo_Drive_1.jpg.cc09bada7811cb8130663f3c47e4f048.jpg

Fits neatly in here and is held in place with a set screw.

 

Looking inside, I could see the remains of the cable so I grabbed it with some needle nose pliers and gave it a tug. Remarkably, with a little effort, the cable slid out, leaving the sheath intact and still secured to the car (it's bolted in several locations so very difficult to remove). OK, that's a good first step. Both ends are fried, but I can get a new cable. The original is 84 inches while my replacement is only 72. I'm positive there are longer alternatives.

 

5-7-21-2.jpg.001f6046965e6d4ad801ec807d8dbd16.jpg  5-7-21-1.jpg.d8d26c3da77c8073fc347cc920afef39.jpg
Both ends of the original speedometer cable are fried. The generic parts

store replacement is exactly the same size (but 12 inches too short, sadly).

 

I tested that T-fitting for the Model T speedometer and it fits perfectly in the slot in the drive gearbox but is a bit too large for the speedometer cable fitting. So I chucked it into the lathe and took it down about .080. Voila! Perfect fit in the speedometer cable. 

 

5-7-21-4.jpg.9469de820871e6740e5dbea75cc1e8ce.jpg  5-7-21-3.jpg.f6ebfa6255ba48836ff496611749335a.jpg
I took a few thousandths off the fitting to get it to fit in the original cable sheath.

 

Now all I have to do is find an 84-inch cable with a square end then attach the fitting to the end. With a square end built into the cable, it should just slide into the sheath and if I measure carefully enough, it'll fit right into the speedometer. The drive end will fit tightly to the cable and be easy to secure to the transmission. 

 

All I have to do is figure out how to secure the fitting to the cable. Crimp? Solder? Weld? I haven't decided. Probably a combination of crimping and soldering. We'll see.

 

5-7-21-6.jpg.7574b2a3d1270885db1ed097f72c0528.jpg

I just need to figure out how to secure the fitting

to the cable.

 

 

Edited by Matt Harwood (see edit history)
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24 minutes ago, maok said:

You may need to have your speedometer checked. There is a reason why that cable has sheared off.

 

Speedo head is freshly rebuilt. I'm sure it was the cause of the failure so that was the first thing I did--pull it and have it rebuilt. It's good to go.

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It's been too cold the last few days to do any buffing (since I do it outside) but today it was warm enough to take one last pass on both heads. I used the white rouge compound on a loose wheel to do the final polish. They both turned out pretty well, and while I could probably improve them a bit more, I'm just tired of buffing. I suppose if someone were paying me $90/hour to do it, I'd keep going, but since they're not I'm probably going to call it good enough. The flaws are still more prominent on the passenger side head but there just wasn't anything I could do to buff them out.

 

Just for grins, I threw the heads on the engine to see how it would look, then added a few other parts to make it look a bit more complete. Looks pretty good, no?

 

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I have just about everything I need to make the speedometer cable, so I'll try that tomorrow. I also have all the gear I need to make my test stand and I'm hopeful that I'll have it set up and ready to fire by June 1. Just waiting on the water pump and exhaust gaskets, I have everything else ready to bolt together. I'm ready to drive this thing.

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Posted (edited)

Looks good!

 

Your ready to drive it? So are all of us! I should be lurking in your area in mid to late June. “Get ‘er done!”

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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I think I got my speedometer cable fixed. I found an 83-inch cable so I didn't need to cut anything and it already had the square end pressed into the cable itself so I didn't need to install an end at the speedometer end. On the transmission end, I soldered my fitting in place using silver solder and it worked perfectly. In fact, I was shocked how easy it was--my projects never go that well. But it's VERY secure and should not come apart. I fed it through the cable sheath (which is still in the car) from the transmission end and secured it to the drive gearbox. Then I installed the speedometer in the dash and connected the cable to the back of the speedometer. Everything fit, but I'm not positive that the cable is long enough. I don't have any way to test it so I'll keep my fingers crossed. At least I know that if I need to make it longer, I can do it easily and it's not a big job.

 

5-15-21-2.jpg.d6a4a30200593e1f337f04b301c314bf.jpg  5-15-21-6.jpg.dbd3387e78a0a89a4a05222179e1a419.jpg
Soldering the tip in place was shockingly easy. It's SOLID.

 

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Then I fed it into the cable sheath until it bottomed out in the fitting.

 

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Gearbox and cable installed on the transmission.

 

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Speedometer end should fit. Is it long enough? Don't know.

 

That took so little time that I decided to clean up the frame a bit. It's grungy but in good condition, so I scraped off as much gunk as I could with a plastic putty knife, then soaked it with degreaser for 10 or 15 minutes. Once it stopped foaming, I fired up the pressure washer and blasted it clean. Turns out that someone seems to have painted it black not too long ago and didn't do a very careful job of it--I think the beige areas are primer and the paint just blew off. I'm going to scuff it and then shoot it with satin black. Most of it should be hidden under the engine, fenders, and splash pans, but it'll be good to have it finished. Nice to see the spring gaiters still intact.

 

I didn't worry about the wiring, which is crumbling, since I've got a new harness on order. My headlights will need some figuring since my hub-mounted clum switch is gone, replaced by a pull-out switch on the dash and what looks like a relay on the firewall. I don't know who did it or when the work was done, but finding all the original light switch parts might be problematic. I'll stick with the solution that's already in place and figure out how to wire it when I get the new harness.

 

5-15-21-10.jpg.79c429bd9e7a51287c814726021d452b.jpg  5-15-21-8.jpg.a13bd3c7eefdce4ad75cddbdb97ea219.jpg

A lot of the black paint blew off as I power washed the frame. The primer is

still intact so I'll scuff and paint.

 

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Front spring perch was by far the dirtiest and

cleaned up pretty well. 

 

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Aluminum gaiters are in great shape. I'll lubricate

 the springs and paint them as well.

 

1940_Buick_Century_61C.jpg.5021fe946c13ee7b6860c35305661a36.jpg

Then I drove home.

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Matt. thank you for the continuing narrative of what you are doing, it is an inspiration to many of us!

Time is approaching when the deep satisfaction of what you have done with your own hands will be remembered on a long drive down the road with your family.

Walt

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Matt.......while it’s easy.......you gonna pull the shackles and clean them and check for fit? The kick springs should also be checked. It will never be easier to deal with them than they are now. 

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1 hour ago, edinmass said:

Matt.......while it’s easy.......you gonna pull the shackles and clean them and check for fit? The kick springs should also be checked. It will never be easier to deal with them than they are now. 

 

Christ, more mission creep? I don't know that I'm up for that. We'll see. Fighting with a giant leaf spring doesn't sound like my idea of a fun Sunday afternoon.

 

12 minutes ago, 38Buick 80C said:

Can you attach power drill to the cable at the trans end to test it? or is that the rectangle thing end?

 

The straight flipper is on the transmission end. I also thought about chucking it into a drill but there's no easy way to grab it. I can spin the gears of the speedometer transmission fast enough with my thumb to make the speedometer move, I just can't see it from under the car. I tried setting up my phone to record it moving but there was glare on the speedometer face I couldn't work around. I'll have one of the guys in the shop watch it on Monday. 

 

I still have to take it apart at least one more time anyway--there should probably be a gasket between the transmission and the speedometer gearbox and I need to lubricate the cable with some graphite. Not sure how I'll get it up in there, but everyone says graphite is the only choice for speedometer cables. 

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9 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

 Not sure how I'll get it up in there, but everyone says graphite is the only choice for speedometer cables. 


You need this or similar

https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B0094IZ3BA/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_glt_fabc_N0SRGYAJR3GR98057F7K

Should come with a little red tube like a bottle of WD-40 does (or steal one from said WD-40).

 

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Posted (edited)

Matt.......fixing hundred year old cars that weighs  three tons is EASY.........just ask anyone who has never done it!

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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Posted (edited)

Trying to make progress just by chipping away at the little stuff--that's how I'll eventually cross the finish line. The assembly part is always the most rewarding and putting shiny new parts together is fun. So to start I installed the valve covers inside the V of the engine. I coated the valves liberally in motor oil, turned the engine over a few times to get it on all the moving parts, then closed them up. A little grease on the blocks held the cork gaskets in place and I secured the valve covers wit their big aluminum knobs, which I polished up a bit on the wheel. Turned out pretty nicely.

 

5-16-21-3.jpg.75c4129effbfbbe3d1d03cf55b3b2a1e.jpg  5-16-21-1.jpg.fc88eaf7d26de61e70b1f7b06eeacaf9.jpg  5-16-21-4.jpg.c0d6e93a98d2759b47ff5e3ce59c204d.jpg

Valve covers were easy to install and look awesome.

 

I also test-fitted my freshened distributor (thanks, Lynn!), leading me to wonder how it's secured to the block. Unfortunately, I didn't take the car apart. When we first decided to send the engine out to have the hole in the block stitched, I merely mentioned to Dr. Francini, our mechanic at the time, that we needed to pull the engine. Francini, being kind of a literal person, took that as an order and started disassembling stuff. A few hours later, the front end of the car was gone and the block was stripped bare.

 

Disassembled1.jpg.2dfb6d59775daa7cf40d89afbc418212.jpg  Disassembled3.jpg.e04584abab2192c381fd79c35d46ddab.jpg

One offhand comment about disassembly and an hour later the car was in pieces.

 

So I don't know how a lot of this stuff fits together and I don't know what supports the distributor--I went through all my parts that Francini removed (and thankfully labeled pretty well) and couldn't find anything that looks like it belongs there. So what belongs there?

 

5-16-21-5.jpg.7ebcda33b0314159f926f331e57ff5b6.jpg  
What supports the distributor?

 

Then I spent some time just looking at the wiring nightmare that I'll have to sort through. As I mentioned, my original hub-mounted steering wheel light switch is gone and my headlights work with a two-position pull-out switch on the dash. I kind of like it better that way and the work was well done so it blends in with the dash. They also used a clever dual relay to manage--I think--headlights and taillights, or maybe high and low beams. It's hard to tell. The downside is that they used all one color wire (yellow) so I don't really know which is which. There are two wires coming from the headlight switch, which appear to go down to the high-beam switch under the floor. Then there are wires coming off the relay to the remains of the original Clum switch at the base of the steering column. I don't rightly know how it's all patched together but I'll have to sort it out to install my new wiring harness. I'd like to keep the headlight switch as-is and re-use the relay, but I'm not sure how they have it set up. Need to do some more thinking.

 

5-16-21-8.jpg.00b090495f91ab8f6272c8a68831541f.jpg

Two-circuit relay appears to control headlights and
taillights, or maybe high and low beams, or

parking light and headlights, with high and low beams

managed by the floor switch. Hard to say, especially
since all the wires are the same color. Ugh.

 

5-16-21-7.jpg.9ad31822491c407127b0d0f12a0c02ab.jpg
Original Clum switch is there, but the wiring is

hacked up and spliced.

 

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I also need another one of these little wingnut things.

 

 

Edited by Matt Harwood (see edit history)
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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Matt Harwood said:

Two-circuit relay appears to control headlights and
taillights, or maybe high and low beams, or

parking light and headlights, with high and low beams

managed by the floor switch. Hard to say, especially
since all the wires are the same color. Ugh.

 

The whole point of relays like those is high and low beam. A nice big fat wire feeds it from a good source of current.

 

That source probably shouldn't have been the battery because it is on the wrong side of the ammeter, but on many of the instruction sheets it was the battery, or a starter post on GM cars, and that is also on the wrong side.

 

It removes some of the voltage drop of the switches and such, and so the floor switch (if it had one) should be on the trigger side, not the load side, and a double relay was needed.

 

I'm not saying that's necessarily what they did though....

 

 

Edited by Bloo (see edit history)
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When I had Model A Fords, I found that Bratton's typically carried the highest quality parts available. You might like this item. https://www.brattons.com/wing-nuts-for-the-terminal-box.html

 

I also think that the original headlight switch looks close enough to those on a Model A Ford that you might want to do a little bit of research on light switches from Model A Ford and Early Ford V8 Vendors. It might be easier to repair or replace the original headlight switch with easily available parts designed for a Ford of that era which would eliminate the need to modify your wiring harness when it arrives. 

 

With a quick search, I found this: https://cgfordparts.com/ufolder/cgcat.php?searchtype=Search+%23&year_choice=35&searchtextdesc=headlight+switch&searchnumber=B-11655-s&sp=Search+%23

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Unfortunately, the Clum switch isn't the problem--I think mine is mostly intact. It's everything else. My car doesn't have the knob or the parts inside the steering column to connect to the Clum switch. I don't know when or why the change was done, but they neatly eliminated all the parts on the hub so it's invisible. Check it out:

 

8299601-2-11.jpg&width=960

Original

 

NoSwitch.jpg.5d8e44baebd649b6d4c82a015545c3b3.jpg

My car

 

Sticking with the dash-mounted switch is probably simplest, even with the significant reverse-engineering needed for the wiring. I'm confident I can figure it out, it'll just take some time and maybe a little trial-and-error. I'm planning on installing a power "bus bar" like I did in the '41 Buick to supply power to things like the fog lights and fuel pump, and why not the headlights, too? Then I can pull power from the proper side of the ammeter as Bloo suggests. Just a little creativity required.

 

I'm actually much more worried about the stand for my distributor, which seems to have gone missing...

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Posted (edited)
17 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

So I don't know how a lot of this stuff fits together and I don't know what supports the distributor--I went through all my parts that Francini removed (and thankfully labeled pretty well) and couldn't find anything that looks like it belongs there. So what belongs there?

 

You throttle linkage attaches to it also, this one is 34 has the spark advance

1934-LincolnK-engine_(14).JPG

Edited by AB-Buff (see edit history)
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16 hours ago, MCHinson said:

I also think that the original headlight switch looks close enough to those on a Model A Ford that you might want to do a little bit of research on light switches from Model A Ford and Early Ford V8 Vendors. It might be easier to repair or replace the original headlight switch with easily available parts designed for a Ford of that era which would eliminate the need to modify your wiring harness when it arrives. 

 

With a quick search, I found this: https://cgfordparts.com/ufolder/cgcat.php?searchtype=Search+%23&year_choice=35&searchtextdesc=headlight+switch&searchnumber=B-11655-s&sp=Search+%23

Model "A" will not work, 1934 and 35 switch is very unique.  It has a passing beam.  Low, passing and high beam.  The passing beam turns the passenger headlight on high beam while the drivers side stays on low. difficult to find

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Found it! It must have been the first part Dr. Francini removed and he stuck it in the trunk rather than in the pile with everything else. Always in the last place you look...

 

531434215_20210517_1312001.jpg.f93451d8a1454081de1f94a45061f82c.jpg

 

I'll clean it up, make a new gasket, and give it a fresh coat of paint, then reinstall it tonight.

 

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52 minutes ago, Matt Harwood said:

Found it! ... Always in the last place you look...

 

Isn't that the truth? Glad you found it! Pretty important part, and I'm sure it would be hard to come by.

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