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The Car Which Shall Not Be Named III (1935 Lincoln K)


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As others have said - do the 36 and mothball the remains of the 35. You won't have to decide to have or have not those oil lines or worry if the threads are mucked-up etc. or if this fits or that fits. Most everything you use will be from the engine it was originally mated too. I don't know much about the Model K but my thoughts are that that engine was not stamped out by the thousands like a common FORD v8. I imagine (and I could be wrong) it was (for lack of a better term) a semi-mass produced engine meaning some hand fitting (lapping etc.) was required to maintain a higher level of quality over lesser wares. which, if true, means its all the more important that the engine is apiece. If the 36 is a nice unmolested unit than I would go for it in a heart beat. At this point your well beyond the tipping point on cost v. value and matching numbers isn't going to make up the difference. I would focus on building a honest, reliable, awesome car you can enjoy for many, many years.

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I am with the majority.  
 

20 years ago I would have suggested the “hybrid “ path of 35 bottom end with 36 top end.  
 

But today I would want the best running option, especially for a pre ww2 car under say $150/100k. 



 

 

 

Edited by Cadillac Fan (see edit history)
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When you have a choice, and here there is clearly a choice..........I always fall back on "Do it right." 

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Figure out the amount of time and money to get the 35 pieced together, sorted out and back in the car, and then don't do it...........Tell your family "I've just saved us xxxxx number of dollars, and a bunch of my time, lets take a family vacation, where would you guys like to go" and spend the savings on them.  Tell them that your one objective on the vacation is to come up with a proper name for the Lincoln, one that can stay with it going forward since you plan on keeping it in the family.  

 

I say this as a guy that understands the whole numbers matching pressure, effect on value, pedigree....etc.  I've played in the corvette world for years and in my opinion, it is overemphasized at the expense and enjoyment of the hobby.  If I ever get around to picking up a straight axle, I may purposefully avoid NM and just get a "correct engine" and pocket the savings.  On second thought, if any of you see me do this, remind me that I'm to take my family on a vacation with my "savings".  

 

Life is short, and it seems like the 36 will have you rolling down the road enjoying that car sooner.  That has tremendous value to you.  

 

my two cents.

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1 hour ago, John Bloom said:

I say this as a guy that understands the whole numbers matching pressure, effect on value, pedigree....etc. my two cents.

I have been through all this crap for 40 years as an active model T guy.  Every time I brought home a brass T the “ex-spurts” have to come by to inform me of all the “corrections” that need to be made. Having owned Corvettes also, I’ve been down that road too.

Matt, build the motor the best way you and Frank decide and the heck with whatever anyone else thinks………my two cents!

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On 4/29/2022 at 8:38 AM, dalef62 said:

Matt,

Is there only that one number stamping on the engine?  You didn't hear it from me, but why don't you file that number off and stamp the correct number on the 36 block? 

That was very common in the past and 'sometimes' done by state officials or under their supervision.  Compare the blocks and numbers...may have been re-stamped in the past.

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My feeling is that you should use the complete, good engine but I confess I think the "matching numbers" game is mostly BS. My reasoning is similar to that of F&J...and I'm thinking of it from the point of view of the gentleman who will be doing the work. I has almost got to be better from his perspective, and probably cheaper from yours, to use all the parts that have been together since new and that have not been mucked with.

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If your doing the 36 engine correctly, you may as well just do the 35. Especially since the number is on the title. At the current point, everything must be looked at…………use the 35 lower. It’s the smart move.

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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Matt,

If you're still seeking input, here's my $0.02.

 

Use the '36 engine.

Keep the 35 shrink-wrapped on a pallet for the next guy to worry about.

Joe

 

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Frank called this morning and asked for cylinder heads and head gaskets so he can do some work on the blocks. I didn't want to hold him up as long as he was getting things done, so I grabbed my spare cylinder heads, plus those NOS head gaskets, the spare crank I bought in Canada a few weeks ago, and the insert rod bearings that I received in the mail this week, and headed out to his place.

 

They pretty much have both engines torn down and are examining the parts to determine which are best to use. I told him not to worry about using my numbers-matching block and to just pick the best one. I also mentioned the buggered threads for the oil pump and he said he could fix those if that's the only issue. He understands the importance of keeping the original numbers but whatever makes a better engine is what we're doing. I could tell he was a little relieved that he wouldn't have to chase perfection if the original crankcase wasn't up to snuff.

 

20220505_124423a.jpg.b6616fff248ee2d6570426eaae7a2fb2.jpg  20220505_125130a.jpg.916d78a85173964346bd244fd2e7b646.jpg  20220505_125142a.jpg.41f7c48ca0779fe3ebcc808b147400bb.jpg

My original engine is torn down to a bare crankcase.

 

20220505_124552a.jpg.b1361db2dc1909fa59f36824169558fe.jpg 

Spare engine also disassembled. The cylinder blocks

visible in this photo are from my original engine and

won't be used for the rebuild.

 

Even Frank with all his experience and resources was not immune to broken studs in the spare engine's block, and had eight of them break just in one of the blocks (and zero on the other). He believes someone has replaced at least some of the head studs at some point in the past as two of the holes are obviously buggered up. He can fix them, no problem, but they were notable in that someone drilled them out and didn't do a very good job of it (it wasn't me!).

 

20220505_124011a.jpg.5c5705ada1c3b334fcbb536ca485f393.jpg

Replacement cylinder block with a few broken head

studs still stuck in place. Frank will drill them out

on the mill so they're straight and true.

 

20220505_124006a.jpg.b1a852305abe0d9d47b606ff1509a5db.jpg

Remains of a drilled-out head stud suggests

someone else has already been in there

dealing with broken studs. I'm not surprised.

 

Frank is still not sure which crank will be the best to use. He has the one out of my block and is trying to pull the timing chain gear off the front but not having much success. He found a factory gear puller (from 1937!) at a friend's shop, so he's going to borrow it and see what happens. He believes that the gear was probably heated up before it was installed on the crank snout, so it's REALLY stuck on there. He's been measuring journals and they're a little worn but not terrible. The Ford 7.3 liter diesel insert bearings I found are .020" undersize, which is EXACTLY the size of the Lincoln's journals, so we will try to use those if we can. However, if that doesn't work, Frank will babbitt the rods and it'll work just as well. I told him whatever he feels he needs to do to make this sucker bulletproof reliable is what I want. The inserts only cost about $150, so if they don't work, no big deal.

 

20220505_124115a.jpg.78781af948e01afd5438f7266ce1a23c.jpg

My original crank is in decent shape. Note the

puller on the timing gear and the damper

(discs) built into the crank snout.

 

20220505_124242a.jpg.45f292fe20d7f0f43fa4d358a8c02574.jpg

Journals are OK and probably good to use but if

they need to be turned too much, we have two

other crankshafts we can try.

 

The last detail was the cam, which is also in decent shape but has some very, very minor burrs on the edges of the lobes--obviously the roller lifters have been rolling on the lobes for decades and there's just a slight bit of wear. Frank isn't sure whether the cam is made of tool steel or was case hardened after it was made (likely the former) but he'll pull the cam from the spare engine and see how it compares. He'll dress the cam and if it needs to be built back up with weld, he has someone who can handle it. It's literally so minor you can't even feel it unless you drag your fingernail across it, but it makes me feel better that Frank is trying to make everything as good as it can be.

 

20220505_125134a.jpg.3fb961b2f271f9bf7bb414261be13330.jpg

Camshaft is in good condition but has some very

slight burrs on the edges where the roller

lifters didn't ride on the lobes. We'll see

if anything serious is required or if they can just

be dressed with a file.

 

Oh, and today was another milestone--I've officially cro$$ed into five figures on the engine rebuild tab. Ugh.

 

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  • 3 weeks later...
5 hours ago, bobcanuck said:

Mr Harwood ... any updates ?

 

Nothing to report. Frank is doing his thing and I don't like to be the pesky customer always checking up on him. He'll call when he has news.

 

Things will probably be slow for a while since we're waiting for custom pistons to be made and a lot of the other work can't continue until we have them. I'm sure he's got those last few parts disassembled and everything will be getting cleaned up, he'll fix the threads in the block that have broken studs in them, but until we get pistons in July, there won't be much to report. Sorry!

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I check this topic literally first every time I log in. I love the body style of this car and can't wait to see a report of it running. It's one of those cars that will always be far out of my reach financially I suspect, and I love that it has an owner that, despite the lows and the obvious pain in the neck it has turned out to be, is too stubborn to let the gremlins win and this beautiful car to die.

I'll admit that contrary to many here, I'd have settled to see it resto-modded. The comments of crushing it spooked me. LOL

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  • 1 month later...

It turned out that the head which was missing on the Canadian engine was the head that was bad on his engine, leaving him with no working engine.

I built a wood funeral pyre in the middle of my pasture out of downed lumber (12 ft high, and 36 ft in diameter).  Matt came to NC with his Lincoln and all spare parts  and  we used used my tractor to place the Lincoln and every spare part on the pyre.

 

A little gasoline around the diameter of the pyre, Matt lit a $100 bill and then threw it on the base of the pyre.  118 minutes later and the Lincoln is a pile of melted metal in my pasture, and the sandy soil in my pasture turned to glass the heat was so intense.

 

Bye Bye Lincoln.

 

I will upload the video to my YouTube Channel shortly.

 

Joe

 

P.S.  Matt said I could use the melted steel to sand cast the Harwood Perseverance Trophy. 

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This has been an interesting and eye opening thread. I give you a lot of credit for sharing all the gory details, I might have been tempted to respond to inquiries by saying only,"I'm working on it!"  I guess that working on any old car is much the same except that your expenses are more than 10X's the numbers that I'm used to. Now I know why guys get excited about barn finds, if they were set aside 40-50 years ago they were spared the series of bodges that would have been used to keep them on the road. In a bit of defense of those past mechanics that filled your engine with half assed makeshift repairs, they were just trying to keep the car running enough to take to car shows and exhibits. If you consider that the value/ cost equation is bad in your situation now, remember what it must have been like in the 1950's before these cars had any current value and any potential value was just a pipe dream.  

I think that you are on the right path and I hope that you will one day be able to enjoy your car. 

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Admitting a mistake in an online forum of experts is, in my opinion, both difficult and rare. Add in the fact that Matt has an amazing reputation on this forum AND a business, makes his openness extraordinary.

 

One day when I travel to Florida for a conference, I am going to go visit him.  I am guessing that he is quite a character.

 

Keep it up Matt.

 

By the way, I am serious about sand casting a trophy. I have so many ideas!  LOL.

 

Joe

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7 minutes ago, Professor said:

Admitting a mistake in an online forum of experts is, in my opinion, both difficult and rare. Add in the fact that Matt has an amazing reputation on this forum AND a business, makes his openness extraordinary.

 

One day when I travel to Florida for a conference, I am going to go visit him.  I am guessing that he is quite a character.

 

Keep it up Matt.

 

By the way, I am serious about sand casting a trophy. I have so many ideas!  LOL.

 

Joe

 

This should be on my wall:

 

mistakesdemotivator_1024x1024.jpeg?v=155

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Matt is in Northeast Ohio, I visited him there on Tuesday this week……….

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Ohio… okay, maybe no visits.  I once worked for an electronics company based out of Cleveland.  I don’t remember anything positive about any of my trips to Cleveland… I hope wherever Matt is, is better than the land of the Cleves.

 

Matt… you need to move your business to Florida so that I can visit.

 

🙂

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  • 4 weeks later...

Frank called and said he was still waiting for pistons, but he's been busy cleaning, machining, drilling, tapping, and boring. I didn't go to his shop, but he did ask for another payment so I put a check in the mail. I'm now into this engine by about as much as I paid for my last new car, and we're not even done. Here's what that looks like:

 

This:

20220505_124552a.jpg.741eb5c2363aa0cacc1aad8dcc7c8c45.jpg

 

Cost about as much as this:

TourxMod3-7-21.jpg.eb7c715fd2e2a9c143847fa210ea78ac.jpg

 

And just trying to remind myself why I'm doing this:

blackwalls2.jpg.4cccdf74174533b0f53ae7103a77e15c.jpg

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12 minutes ago, Matt Harwood said:

Frank called and said he was still waiting for pistons, but he's been busy cleaning, machining, drilling, tapping, and boring. I didn't go to his shop, but he did ask for another payment so I put a check in the mail. I'm now into this engine by about as much as I paid for my last new car, and we're not even done. Here's what that looks like:

 

This:

20220505_124552a.jpg.741eb5c2363aa0cacc1aad8dcc7c8c45.jpg

 

Cost about as much as this:

TourxMod3-7-21.jpg.eb7c715fd2e2a9c143847fa210ea78ac.jpg

 

And just trying to remind myself why I'm doing this:

blackwalls2.jpg.4cccdf74174533b0f53ae7103a77e15c.jpg

I can see the problem, it needs white walls....😁

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16 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

Frank called and said he was still waiting for pistons, but he's been busy cleaning, machining, drilling, tapping, and boring. I didn't go to his shop, but he did ask for another payment so I put a check in the mail. I'm now into this engine by about as much as I paid for my last new car, and we're not even done. Here's what that looks like:

 

This:

 

 

Cost about as much as this:

TourxMod3-7-21.jpg.eb7c715fd2e2a9c143847fa210ea78ac.jpg

 

And just trying to remind myself why I'm doing this:

 

Tell me more about that great looking Buick!

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8 hours ago, TexRiv_63 said:

Tell me more about that great looking Buick!

2019 Buick Regal TourX. It's actually a German Opel built under contract and fitted with Buick badges. Only built for three years, so if you want one you'll have to find a used one. Melanie bought this one for me in 2020 as a surprise gift to replace my aging Cadillac CTS wagon. The Buick and I got off to a rocky start but it has been largely trouble-free for the last year and it has really grown on me. It is hands-down the best long-distance travel car I've ever owned, including my beloved Audi allroad. It just eats up pavement effortlessly at insane speeds. It's also big enough for our whole family, gets 30+ MPG, has all-wheel-drive, and with a few upgrades like the 20-inch wheels and lowering springs, it's a capable handler. A very satisfying car. It gets lots of complements and "What is that?" when I'm in parking lots, so I take that as a good sign that this is a cool car.

 

Next upgrade is removing all that black plastic and installing a Buick Regal GS nose since mine was damaged in the winter when I skidded into my garage door frame.

 

36079658_2020-10-0613_59_34.jpg.57813044a12d572ff9e7b9380428c56a.jpg  310323555_2020-10-0614_05_44.jpg.72520d37946333147130c339f31da887.jpg

 

The plan to ditch the plastic cladding (once I'm done paying for the Lincoln engine, I guess--one project at a time):

280072482_10219865531204373_1322605134997675438_n.jpg.8b1e0ad0103d5e104cce55d9ae9c6766.jpg

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1 minute ago, Matt Harwood said:

2019 Buick Regal TourX. It's actually a German Opel built under contract and fitted with Buick badges. Only built for three years, so if you want one you'll have to find a used one. Melanie bought this one for me in 2020 as a surprise gift to replace my aging Cadillac CTS wagon. The Buick and I got off to a rocky start but it has been largely trouble-free for the last year and it has really grown on me. It is hands-down the best long-distance travel car I've ever owned, including my beloved Audi allroad. It just eats up pavement effortlessly at insane speeds. It's also big enough for our whole family, gets 30+ MPG, has all-wheel-drive, and with a few upgrades like the 20-inch wheels and lowering springs, it's a capable handler. A very satisfying car. It gets lots of complements and "What is that?" when I'm in parking lots, so I take that as a good sign that this is a cool car.

 

Next upgrade is removing all that black plastic and installing a Buick Regal GS nose since mine was damaged in the winter when I skidded into my garage door frame.

 

36079658_2020-10-0613_59_34.jpg.57813044a12d572ff9e7b9380428c56a.jpg  310323555_2020-10-0614_05_44.jpg.72520d37946333147130c339f31da887.jpg

 

The plan to ditch the plastic cladding (once I'm done paying for the Lincoln engine, I guess--one project at a time):

280072482_10219865531204373_1322605134997675438_n.jpg.8b1e0ad0103d5e104cce55d9ae9c6766.jpg

In Australia its called the Commodore. Interestingly, in '78 GM Holden copied the German Opel to begin the Commodore nameplate and the last one was also a direct copy of the Opel.

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18 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

2019 Buick Regal TourX. It's actually a German Opel built under contract and fitted with Buick badges. Only built for three years, so if you want one you'll have to find a used one. Melanie bought this one for me in 2020 as a surprise gift to replace my aging Cadillac CTS wagon. The Buick and I got off to a rocky start but it has been largely trouble-free for the last year and it has really grown on me. It is hands-down the best long-distance travel car I've ever owned, including my beloved Audi allroad. It just eats up pavement effortlessly at insane speeds. It's also big enough for our whole family, gets 30+ MPG, has all-wheel-drive, and with a few upgrades like the 20-inch wheels and lowering springs, it's a capable handler. A very satisfying car. It gets lots of complements and "What is that?" when I'm in parking lots, so I take that as a good sign that this is a cool car.

 

Next upgrade is removing all that black plastic and installing a Buick Regal GS nose since mine was damaged in the winter when I skidded into my garage door frame.

 

36079658_2020-10-0613_59_34.jpg.57813044a12d572ff9e7b9380428c56a.jpg  310323555_2020-10-0614_05_44.jpg.72520d37946333147130c339f31da887.jpg

 

The plan to ditch the plastic cladding (once I'm done paying for the Lincoln engine, I guess--one project at a time):

280072482_10219865531204373_1322605134997675438_n.jpg.8b1e0ad0103d5e104cce55d9ae9c6766.jpg

That one is a surprise, very good looking car. I will admit to paying no attention to Buicks and most other new vehicles for about the last 25 years, sorry I missed this one. Good call on ditching the cladding, it looks much better all white.

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