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The Car Which Shall Not Be Named III (1935 Lincoln K)


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On 7/3/2021 at 11:19 AM, AB-Buff said:

Matt after you get this engine running (hopefully soon) put a vacuum gauge on the port just below the carburetor On the manifold and see what it is. Then when you install it in the car check it again. You may end up having to go through your brake system. There’s a couple of vacuum diaphragms that can go away in time. One is the adjustment that you have on your steering column there’s a diaphragm in there that can develop a leak and then there is what I call an actuator switch controlled by the brake pedal. When you press the brake on it pulls a rod which allows vacuum to go through your selector switch on the steering column to the brake booster underneath the car. When I got mine somebody had rebuilt the booster but they did not mess with the selector switch on the steering column or the actuator switch off of the brake pedal. Both diaphragms had holes in them. The car still ran well but I was losing vacuum. 5EBAACAF-77E9-44D8-AB31-044343446896.jpeg.bcf1d02b565b7b8613b668a6f605fd73.jpeg

selector, mounts to steering column F0909F3E-A26C-47EE-88C1-5AF241A3F9E6.jpeg.d84915c4ffe45cc80a89a305672f7c26.jpeg

bad diaphragm 

 

 

 

 

50912A14-77B6-4213-98AD-9030FF57DD99.jpeg

actuator mounts to break linkage

7886CA2A-6E0F-4942-90AC-C243397AC3A5.jpeg

FF3E2CF5-0ED1-49F0-A7C8-C5B19F62C70F.jpeg

 

Thanks, Lynn. My system was offline when I got the car--the booster was frozen but the adjuster on the steering column was leaking like crazy. I just couldn't make the car idle correctly. Eventually I just capped the vacuum port and disconnected the system. I'll work on getting it back in operation later. I have freed up the booster and it moves freely now, and I suppose I'll tear into both of the actuators you mention here. My brakes were actually VERY effective even without power assist and most people say it doesn't really add much anyway, so it's not going to be a very high priority.

 

Where did you get your replacement diaphragms? Brian Joseph? 

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Posted (edited)

No, I use the material I had laying around here. I’m almost embarrassed to tell you what it is but it works fantastic. I cut a piece of it up threw it in some gasoline for a couple of weeks to see if it would dissolved and it didn’t. It’s actually a roofing material called tiger paw. It’s advertised to last 20 years in the sun by itself. It worked fantastic for the diaphragm. If you want a piece I can send you some. It’s not rocket science it’s just a diaphragm and as long as the gasoline won’t eat it up and it doesn’t leak vacuum and it functions properly. It’ll work.

L

took me a while to grind a photo of the diaphragm 

96ADEEEC-DB2A-432A-9263-9E09D2F23219.jpeg

Edited by AB-Buff (see edit history)
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Had a great weekend in Auburn, IN with the AACA. Very nice show with great variety, a cruise-in downtown on Friday night, and we had a comfortable, easy drive both ways. I drove the '41 Limited and Melanie took her pink Chrysler wagon. No real issues other than the voltage regulator on the Buick gave up during the drive to Auburn (and I was able to source a replacement overnight--big kudos to Autozone!) and a flat tire on Melanie's car as we were driving to the show Saturday morning. Fortunately we had a full-sized spare so it wasn't the end of the trip. Both cars just hammered along at 60 MPH in 90+ temperatures without so much as a hiccup. If this Lincoln is even half as good as my Buick, I'll be pleased.

 

395050680_2021-07-0118_54_33.jpg.b7cc222a7ecd276e1a7e75bcf8182ee7.jpg

 

That said, I'm starting to get a little nervous. About a month to go before the Lincoln 100th anniversary show and I heard from Jim last week that we're going to have to use old-style packing because the housing is too small for a ceramic bearing. That's bummer #1. Bummer #2 is that he's still looking for a machine shop to make a new end cover for the water pump. As a result, I have started searching for a replacement water pump just for parts, but have not been successful checking with any of the usual sources. Does anyone have one laying around that I could borrow? I just need the rear cover.

 

There's a complete engine for sale with a water pump attached and they've marked it down to $9500, which is now within the tempting range. It would be a hard sell with Melanie, however, considering how much I've spent on MY engine, never mind the fact that it's a MASSIVE price tag for just a water pump. If someone has one or even just the end cap that I could borrow until we get this one one made so I can start testing the engine, that would be awesome. I'm starting to wish I'd bought that parts car out of that cache of Lincoln heaps in California.

 

Anyway, I was at the shop today to show a car and took some time to do one of the last remaining projects. There's a phenolic spacer under the carburetor and mine was pretty mushy and deformed. A few weeks ago, I ordered a 12x12 sheet of phenolic material that looks, at a glance, like a sheet of polished mahogany or something--it's quite beautiful. Up close you can see the woven cloth and resin. Using one of the carb gaskets as a template, I cut a chunk of phenolic material to size then drilled two 1.5 inch holes for the venturis and four 1/4-inch holes for the mounting studs. Easy. It fit, so I spray painted the exposed edges black to help it blend in, then installed it.

 

343323288_2021-07-0515_17_12.jpg.9306945d3eb060d68867a1218e7fc5d5.jpg  1412246551_2021-07-0515_17_04.jpg.0eade984072c71e82b6ef91e9ded281d.jpg

Phenolic material was surprisingly difficult to cut. It knocked the teeth 

off a hole saw pretty easily. Impressive. Eventually I got it cut to shape.

 

214774022_2021-07-0515_19_03.jpg.66f209106cc2bcf74a31adee3c8285e4.jpg  1593462920_2021-07-0515_38_32.jpg.6d3cd0bbe5cd057a0924c384d7365ff9.jpg
Painted the edges to help it blend in. Phenolic material obviously absorbs

paint pretty well. Maybe I'll give it a second coat. Or not.

 

What do I do now?

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Matt,

Finding a tiny ceramic seal can be difficult.

I have managed to fit ceramic seals to the water pumps on a couple of 1920's Packards where space was very tight, eg 5/8" shaft in a 1 1/4" bore dia housing.  I had to use the seat  and spring from one seal and the shaft seal from another.  I think they were a mix of metric and imperial but it worked.  If depth is an issue the spring can be shortened, Garlock will not agree with this but we are sealing negligible pressure and spring tension is not so critical.  

I have attached a sketch which may be too hard to read.  The seals were Garlock and the part numbers were:
Shaft seal & SPRING:  340HFCXXXX10

Seat:  340XXXXAKF016

 

It took a lot of searching and a very helpful person at Garlock.  The person reconditioning your pump probably can't spare the time, maybe you can find a suitable small seal.  1204264821_Waterpumpsealceramic.jpg.3ac1d093f44ec0af67ef56dad9eb8260.jpg1204264821_Waterpumpsealceramic.jpg.3ac1d093f44ec0af67ef56dad9eb8260.jpg

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Posted (edited)

Matt......here is where fifty years in the hobby comes in. Just assemble the pump with a regular packing and repaired cover. Get the car together, and to the 100th anniversary meet. Having been to them, I can tell you it will be a top ten meet in your lifetime. Having your car there IS IMPORTANT. Get the car running, get it assembled,  get some miles on it. You can go back to the water pump this winter. This is not a shortcut. Sometimes reality and timelines do not mix. Get the car running ........ get it to the meet. You can 3-D print a pattern out in the future easily. Do it in bronze or aluminum. It’s just a cover that gets painted. I know you implied it wasn’t the simplest cover in the world but I’m sure it’s pretty easy to do. Get your car in the road, you won’t regret it. Happy Fourth of July. Ed

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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6 minutes ago, JV Puleo said:

I'm curious as to how complicated it can be. Can you post a photo? If it's not too bad maybe I can knock off a "temporary" version.

 

jp

 

Wow, that would be awesome if you can do it! It's a little complicated but not outrageously so, although I'm not a machinist so maybe it is complicated. It looks like there's a bushing inside for the water pump shaft that's fed by a grease cup. The rest is fairly straightforward aside from the semi-conical shape of the inner surface. Here are photos of my broken one:

 

Cover2.jpg.f9d1e51c3726c842a6891d8bf04d6170.jpg  Cover1.jpg.866a4b378415d79c88416008609cd077.jpg

 

I bet you'd need the part in-hand to duplicate it but if you think you can do it, I can probably get it to you overnight. Thank you, Joe!

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Matt,

For the water pump parts: how about posting an ad in the "Parts Wanted" section? The CCCA section? The Lincoln section?

The increase in exposure will be better for your chances....

Best of luck,

Tom

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Matt, what is the diameter...and about how thick it is.

It doesn't look too difficult. I'd want to make it out of aluminum since that would be the easiest to work and I might have the material. I'd probably make it flat across the front. The original was cast. I could get another cast next door but that might take time - I'm not in a position to push the foundry, just happy they'll take my jobs and get them done in their own time.

 

jp

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Posted (edited)

Matt.......that’s not too hard to knock out of gunmetal. Aluminum also would work.  The external side is not critical, and the internal side is rather simple. I’m certain Joe can knock it out. He will need the entire pump and not just the cover, as the shaft hole must be concentric. It’s possible to make it out of steel also. And maybe water jet it out? They do amazing things with a four axis water jet. Time is always an constraint. I probably would do it out of aluminum in two pieces. Can’t wait to see what Joe has for ideas. 
 

PS- put a tape measure across that thing in several places, and draw a quick sketch. Looks like the dividing head he used in my White may come in handy!

 

 

One last thought......back in 1987 I needed an entire Model K pump.......and still have never seen one for sale. We repaired ours that had been pinned together. They are as rare as unicorn horns. 

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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Posted (edited)

From the pictures I'm inclined to agree...make the hub in the center as a separate part and screw it in. Then turn the outside flange off the center. I'd use my other dividing head though as it is set up to use on the drill press. I can probably get it close to dead nuts...but Matt would have to lap in the bushing with a dummy pump shaft....that isn't hard to do. If it's a 3/4" shaft, I have one here.

Edited by JV Puleo (see edit history)
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“close to dead nuts”

 

 

Everything Joe machines is DEAD NUTS............... he’s a true craftsman. And a very nice guy. Talented more than most people realize. He’s one of about five people in the world I trust with my parts/projects.......and I know everybody. 

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Posted (edited)
30 minutes ago, JV Puleo said:

From the pictures I'm inclined to agree...make the hub in the center as a separate part and screw it in. Then turn the outside flange off the center. I'd use my other dividing head though as it is set up to use on the drill press. I can probably get it close to dead nuts...but Matt would have to lap in the bushing with a dummy pump shaft....that isn't hard to do. If it's a 3/4" shaft, I have one here.

 

Joe, I'll talk to my rebuilder, Jim, tomorrow and see about retrieving the pieces. I do have one other iron in the fire, and that's asking my friend Gary at the Canton Classic Car Museum if he's got one I can buy or even borrow. I'm sure he'll let me know in the next day or two.

 

But failing that, do you need the entire pump or just the cover? It already has a new shaft and bearings and seals in it, just waiting for that cover and it's good to go. I don't particularly care how it looks since it's not terribly visible once it's installed. But if you can get the part made and have it operate, I'd be grateful. Let me know your requirements and I'll get things in motion on my end.

 

Thank you!

 

 

Edited by Matt Harwood (see edit history)
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Posted (edited)

Having the entire pump is certainly preferable. If we had engineering drawings I could probably work to them but remember, I have no formal training in this stuff so working from the parts is actually what I do best.

 

I'm curious about the threaded hole in the end...from our photo it looks as if it's just a plug that allows access to the bearing in the cover. I'd need the plug to match the thread. It isn't easy to measure inside a hole...or, if it's just a plug, I can just thread it whatever size I think best and make a plug. I take it the shaft does not pass through the cover so the bushing in the cover just steadies the end of the shaft.

 

I'm with Terry here...it's and easy pattern to make and cast. I'd make it in bronze unless the pump body is aluminum...if it is, that's what I'd use.

 

Edited by JV Puleo (see edit history)
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Matt I have been hearing conflicting stories on when the LOC will celebrate the hundredth anniversary. Everybody I talk to now says it is in 2022. 100 years from when Ford bought it from Leland. Anyway maybe there is another hundredth celebration somewhere you’re talking about? 
Lynn

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It depends who’s paying the bills, if it’s Lincoln motor company as a sponsor I’m guessing it will be in 2022. If the club is doing it without any sponsorship it will be 2021. I think they’re cool enough that they should do it both years! I can tell you this, any of the 100th anniversary meats are spectacular. I unfortunately missed the Packard event. The Pierce Arrow show in Buffalo was spectacular. I think there were about 175 cars. It was quite an event. 

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I had just talked with one of the VPs of the LOC. He said the club is planning on next year. I’m guessing it’s going to be in conjunction with Ford, probably a big event. They are planning a very nice event this year but I don’t think it’s the 100. I’ve been planning on going next year. When Matt wrote it was this year I panicked. I need to find a trailer to use to get my Lincoln there and back. I don’t have an extra $27,000 in the bank to buy a new one, wish I did. Anyway this year‘s festivities look great, But I think the official 100th is next year.

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This years or next years show does not matter, the Lincoln needs to get fixed NOW.

Not sure of the water pump's cover size, but I have a 4" diameter of 6061 grade of aluminum that is 1"+ in thickness that I am willing to donate to the cause.....in fact I will send two pieces to Joe so that he can have less stress than if he was just working with one piece.

Let's get this project done !

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I have a piece about 3/4" of an inch thick but I think 1" would be better. At least it would give me more to work with. Until I see the piece I'm not sure what it will need. Lets hear what Matt wants to do...but my address is:

Joe Puleo

c/o Mowbray Publishing Company

54 East School St.

Woonsocket, RI 02895

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BOOM! Mission accomplished! Gary at the Canton Classic Car Museum comes through again! He had exactly one of these that wasn't cracked or welded and this is it. I only wanted to borrow it to get my car back on the road and then have one reproduced over the winter, but they were willing to sell this one to me outright. I didn't even hesitate and just took out my wallet. They note that they're probably just about done restoring Lincolns so selling off their parts cache is in the near future. Now I don't feel as guilty and I'll be picking up a lot of spares as soon as they say the sale is a go. I bet there's enough stuff there to assemble a dozen Lincoln KA/KB/K chassis and keep another 50 cars on the road indefinitely.

 

Gary notes that the holes in these covers are NOT symmetrical and we had to make sure this cover was for a later water pump like mine. We went to the store room where he had--I kid you not--15 or 20 Lincoln K water pumps sitting on the shelf in various conditions and states of assembly. Sure enough, this one fits the later pump so I'm good to go. Gary recommends reaming the holes slightly oversize and using black RTV to assemble this rear cover rather than a gasket--the gasket is what makes them crack because it's too easy to torque it down unevenly. It's a precision fit and it's not under any pressure, so only a tiny bit of RTV is needed around the perimeter to seal it up. He hasn't steered me wrong yet, so I'll take his advice.

 

The other part in the third photo is something that Gary makes for all of these water pumps to bypass the built-in oil cooler. It's not really an oil "cooler" but an oil "warmer." Gary recommends removing it and they make this bypass tube to eliminate the original honeycomb block. Since we're not driving the cars in winter weather, there's no reason to warm the oil with coolant, nor any reason to add the heat of the oil to the radiator. And even though my core checked out OK, Gary said that sooner or later I'll have maple syrup in my cooling system because they are all on the verge of failure. So he gave me one of their bypass units which I'll have Jim install when he assembles the pump. I'm going to run these parts out to Jim later today or tomorrow so he can get to work assembling the pump.

 

20210707_142440.jpg.6f42fcbb3cffa01097e74f2b795f53f8.jpg  20210707_142435.jpg.76a5881eae5e52caec23a1eac36ff62d.jpg

 

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368693676_20210707_1457511.jpg.cb9951a974523bf46c69dac8db91e2e6.jpg  1762666487_20210707_1457451.jpg.c00f66d26e34a619d80e52b5068eaa7a.jpg

 

I don't know what next steps will be, but first and foremost I want to thank Joe, Ed, and and tom_in_nh for leaping into action to help me out. I'm still thinking about reproducing these covers since most of them seem to be cracked, but I'm not sure how that would work. Do it in billet steel or aluminum on a lathe or have new ones cast in bronze? I don't know if there's a market, but I can't be the only guy who needed one (I bet a bunch of folks need them and don't know it yet). But at any rate, THANK YOU for your sincere and selfless generosity to help me out. I suspect you're all a little relieved that this project won't drag you into a black hole of Lincoln, but it sure made me feel good to have friends like you who so eagerly stepped up to extend a helping hand. You have my most sincere gratitude.


Let's see what happens next. Hopefully we hear the sound of this thing running very soon...

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What is it made of? The photo of your broken and repaired one suggests cast iron. That was really a poor choice unless you have a pile of them to fall back on. Bronze would be better as would aluminum but bronze would be my first choice. If the hole pattern is irregular depending on the year, but otherwise they are identical, I'd say it should be cast without the bosses for the holes so that the proper hole pattern can be drilled. Drilling those holes is, however, not something the average hobbyist is likely to be able to do easily. I'd suggest selling the covers with however many templates are needed to get the right pattern. They it could probably be done in a conventional drill press if one were very careful.

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Posted (edited)

Matt I am glad you found a solution. In regards to the cover - I am not buying the gasket causing the cracking. It doesn't take much of a gasket to get a good seal nor a ton of torque on the fasteners. These covers were installed at the factory with no problem and without the use of gasket goop stuff or reaming the bolt holes. If it cracks some one is doing something not quite right. If the cover is precision fit with the pump body, and perhaps hand fitted - than I can see where some additional hand fitting may be required if the cover wasn't original fitted to that particular pump body. I.e. it may be slightly bigger causing an interference fit. If you force it using the fasteners (or the tractor mechanic's favorite tool) it could very well fracture the cover. Does the cover need a close location fit (LT)? Yup, but an interference fit... I doubt very much.

 

I have an assembly on the work bench that is just that situation. The top casting came from a different assembly which was indeed hand fitted at the factory as was every part of the engine -  so they do not fit quite right. I know if I try to force it I could easily break a very unobtainable piece. However, a bit of hand fitting with the layout dye and emery cloth will make it right. It should fit with no perceptible wiggle but certainly not tight since the design intent is that it needs to able to be assembled and disassembled with little effort.

 

Good quality grey cast iron or bronze - casting it would be the way to go. Machining from billet is a last resort - vastly increased machine time ($$$)  and wasted material.

Again, the pattern itself is easy - one piece pattern which as usual would include draft, shrink rate and machine allowance.  You would also want a shop drawing as well and make sure the tolerances are included and appropriate precision (only where needed) as well as the alternative bolt hole patterns.

 

 

 

 

Edited by Terry Harper (see edit history)
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This is so interesting to read and gives a bare bones insight as to what can and does happen and also what can be done to correct the situation/problem to function again. My sincere thanks to all who comment - some amazing knowledge out there that IS SHARED! We are all brothers in this - even if we do not own a similar car nor most likely never will.

Just so nice to see everyone trying to help everyone else out despite never meeting in person and being thousands of miles apart. Beyond the success of completing a restoration , you are preserving for history something that was made nearly 90 years ago, that the manufacturer expected after a few years that you would  then buy the new model that they were offering and disposing of the old unit. USED CARS how we love them!

My thanks to Matt H. for helping a friend who lives near me and I see often with some gaskets for his similar year car and model.  As the movie title of some years ago stated "A league of extraordinary gentleman" . Thank you for being who you all are . Preservationists of the first order.

Walt

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What Walt said.  This is becoming one of the go to threads here with tremendous interest and a view into how things can, should get done.  

FWIW we briefly considered this car a while back, (possible repeat 2 for 1 trade..)but things sometime happen for a reason, and Matt has time, ability and resources to do this right, I expect his reward will be an awesome tour car you do not see at every meet, even CCCA gatherings.👍👍👍

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I should have the water pump back first thing next week. It just needs assembly and a packing nut, which was a little chewed up. Jim is going to make a new one, although I gave him Gary's number just in case.

 

I appreciate all the kind words and support. That is what has kept me pushing forward on this project--I look forward to sharing whatever I've done with the rest of you, good or bad. Failures can be instructive, perhaps more so than successes and if my only purpose is to serve as a warning to others, well, then maybe I'd call that a win. I can't claim credit for the successes as I've had a lot of help from a variety of sources, but I can claim 100% of the failures which are always my own doing. As long as the successes outnumber the failures, things keep moving forwards.

 

Right now, I'm itching for things to do. I guess I could drill the hole for the lower radiator hose through the wood blocks of my "engine mounts" on the stand and get ready to install that. But otherwise, the engine is ready to run once the water pump is in place and the radiator is full of coolant. I'm waiting on a new wiring harness from RI Wiring, and they recommended that I call them to pester them about it after 3 months, so I guess I can do that. I'm just wondering how I'm going to fill this weekend--I can't bear to have nothing to do and it's killing me.

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Matt.......if it makes you feel better, today an oil change turned into a pull down of an engine. Usually I would think nothing of it. Except that my personal curse is I don't work on anything that isn't cool, unusual, and exceptionaly difficult. I have never worked on a CCCA Classic that has eight cylinder heads before..............and so starts the shit show. Good news........no gaskets are available at all...........so I get to make everything here in the shop by hand. Pass me the Rye.........I'm gonna need it. 

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Posted (edited)

Was at the shop to show a car so I did some busywork. One was sandblasting the air cleaner and valve covers on a car that's getting its engine bay detailed, but after that I wanted to do some work on the Lincoln. I dragged the buffing wheel out one last time (man, that thing's heavy) and cleaned up the hubcaps. They appear to be stainless skins wrapped over a steel core, but just the same I only used a white rouge compound on a loose cotton wheel so it wouldn't be too aggressive. My caps are just mediocre anyway but giving them a hard buff probably wouldn't make them look any better, just wrinkled AND shiny. There was a modest improvement, not huge, but it should be pretty consistent with the rest of the car's look.

 

I also just realized I have two more for the sidemounts that I didn't polish. Ooops.

 

7-10-21-7.jpg.f5101e555478f0562b210700db46e0b0.jpg
Where I started.

 

7-10-21-4.jpg.5e6882ade02274c65918aa88957a0400.jpg

Buffing wheel with white rouge compound definitely

made a difference and cut the oxidation without

removing any metal.

 

7-10-21-5.jpg.1a4c818642590a63f5dfb8bb5ca80807.jpg
Before and after (bottom two have been polished).

Not a huge difference, but a bit brighter.

 

7-10-21-3.jpg.41a36c212b0272fd24bcd3ce41bd27aa.jpg
Then I hit them with some Mother's metal polish
to bring up the shine a bit and seal them to

keep them shiny longer.

 

7-10-21-2.jpg.042860c39b39efbfc9f55d6aa9c1b088.jpg

Reinstalled the emblems with new hardware.

 

7-10-21-1.jpg.8ede424729649c2695c58bb47d79290a.jpg

As long as I had the buffing wheel out, I also hit the

oil filler cap. I believed it was aluminum but it

appears to be nickel plated. Sadly, I blew through

the plating on the very crown of the cap simply

because I got a little too aggressive. Dang.

 

Edited by Matt Harwood (see edit history)
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We're having another discussion in the shop, this time about pinstripes. Granted, it's a little premature to be talking cosmetics on a car bereft of an engine, but we've been looking at patterns and locations. The paint job is quite good despite being as old as I am, but I wish they hadn't painted all the moldings a different red--it looks a little busy. A medium gray pinstripe might break it up a bit and the gray would match the interior. I'm hoping it might be subtraction by addition.

 

So we have two schools of thought. Roman, Stephon, and I are leaning towards a single pinstripe along the main belt molding, wrapping from the leading edges of the hood around the back of the car. Like this:

 

Pinstripe_Molding3.jpg.74cbb4933fe78e12a4d77507f3c3150d.jpg  Pinstripe_Molding1.jpg.3144f5c7a78bbc6b4c96e40cb3b55501.jpg
Granted it's a bit hard to see, but one pinstripe along the main belt molding.

 

Then Melanie and Michael had an alternative suggestion: two pinstripes on the bodywork BETWEEN the moldings. One would go to the leading edge of the hood and around the back, while the other would wrap around following the molding and ahead of the windshield, then around the back of the car. Like this:

 

Pinstripe_Body2.jpg.89aa41136775150594ddd35805838f51.jpg  Pinstripe_Body1.jpg.55f94255e683b6021608e5e310f14c7b.jpg

Two pinstripes on the bodywork between the moldings.

 

I have a good pinstriper who  can lay it down in paint, but maybe I'll get some gray pinstripe tape and mock it up and see which I really prefer. Or maybe it's adding more detail where there's already too much. I guess I won't know until I see it. 

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Too much. Less is more. It’s busy with the current stripe and window detail. 

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14 minutes ago, Matt Harwood said:

OK, OK, no pinstripes. I'm just bored. I need something to do.

 

 


 

Come on down south and visit. I have some things for you to help me out on. I promise you won’t be bored......we have a bunch of cool junk we play with every day.

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2 minutes ago, edinmass said:


 

Come on down south and visit. I have some things for you to help me out on. I promise you won’t be bored......we have a bunch of cool junk we play with every day.

 

You know, I've realized something recently working on other cars in our shop--I don't enjoy working on other people's cars. At all. So it isn't the work itself that I enjoy, it's the improving my own stuff with hopes that I'll be able to enjoy it sometime soon. I don't even particularly enjoy working on cars that I technically own but will be selling, like this nice little Mustang I bought a few weeks ago which needs a detailing in the engine bay. I'll do it, but there's no excitement or anticipation in it. I look forward to working on the Buick or the Lincoln, but I had to drag myself to the shop yesterday to sandblast the Mustang's valve covers and air cleaner. 

 

I don't know why I'm like that, but there it is.

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I get that...........I think the only difference is I have more years in then you do, so I have become numb to it. Also, I have a discipline of how I fix things. I now only work on two cars at a time. One in the shop at work........and one of mine. No more having five or six cars apart. I insist on doing it my way. It takes more time to get any one particular project done, but the piece of mind is worth it. Also, with so many cars to drive, if I get a bad attitude towards a current project......I jump in a fantastic car and take it to lunch or dinner. No matter how bad your mood is after having a bad day wrenching on cars, taking it low mileage open Duesenberg up for a spin gives you a mental adjustment. “I highly recommend you try it,  you have the means!” (Ferris Buler)

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