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The Car Which Shall Not Be Named III (1935 Lincoln K)


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If you leave the coils upside down, all the spark will run out of them...........just saying.

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1 minute ago, edinmass said:

If you leave the coils upside down, all the spark will run out of them...........just saying.

 

It's OK, Henry Ford insisted that the electrical system be gravity-fed.

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23 minutes ago, Matt Harwood said:

Starter solenoid. I thought this was a fourth terminal

but it's actually a button. Is that like a remote start

function?

 

Matt, that is a button to spin the starter, and you're right it is really handy. It should have a little cap to cover the button. I've almost lost the cap on my solenoid no less the 10 times; somehow still have it. I think a valve stem cap might fit; it looks similar.

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4 hours ago, edinmass said:

Prewarnut............having known Matt for years, and how he does things, I didn’t think I needed to imply heat cycling the engine. I knew he would do it already. No need to load the unit.......just spinning it up to max RPM is fine. The times flies when running an engine. Usually we just run it for two or three gallons at a time......however it works out. I expect he won’t have any issues.........

Thanks, I think my day job keeps me too literal. I know you guys have some secret handshakes going around *laugh*

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1 hour ago, edinmass said:

 

If you leave the coils upside down, all the spark will run out of them...........just saying.

 

You can take a day or two to wipe that up after it runs out. 😂

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Now that we mention coils that brings up another topic. I’ve had issues with coils in the past like, back in 1970 something. Where the coil was mounted to the intake manifold and became extremely hot and then quit and then when it cools off a little bit started working again and so on. When I took my Lincoln out for the last drive I was on it quit on me, which I said was the ignition switch. But I pulled the coil cover off and felt them and they were extremely hot. I’m wondering if because my switch had a lot of resistance going through the switch the coils were running a slow lower voltage and got hot? Does anybody know at what temperature a coil quits to function and at what temperature?

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Posted (edited)
9 hours ago, AB-Buff said:

Now that we mention coils that brings up another topic. I’ve had issues with coils in the past like, back in 1970 something. Where the coil was mounted to the intake manifold and became extremely hot and then quit and then when it cools off a little bit started working again and so on. When I took my Lincoln out for the last drive I was on it quit on me, which I said was the ignition switch. But I pulled the coil cover off and felt them and they were extremely hot. I’m wondering if because my switch had a lot of resistance going through the switch the coils were running a slow lower voltage and got hot? Does anybody know at what temperature a coil quits to function and at what temperature?

 

Over the years, too many people claimed coil problems and swapped them out. Recently.....the last ten years or so, I have been experiencing coil failure at very high rates. Such high rates I now no longer ever use original, or even old coils. I have now begun to see modern coil failure and new defective coil problems. I have a set of original DeJohn coils that will run our P1 Rolls below 1200 rpm......any higher and running problems pop up. I have a 1940’s coil tester that will heat and load test coils......now I test every new coil before I install it. Just a month ago, I had a new defective flamethrower coil............as time progresses, I expect coil failure will continue to escalate. On tour, I always cary spare coils. Same goes for modern electric fuel pumps......they are having issues way out of proportion compared to any other component I have seen.
 

 

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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Did a little wiring tonight. The nice thing is that I'll only need five wires to make the engine run, so I was able to do most of the wiring using scraps from the shop rather than trying to make a fancy wiring harness. Since the wires are accessible and easy to see, I didn't much care about color-coding anything, although I did add a fusible link between the starter solenoid and the rest of the system, so if something goes wrong I at least have a little protection. I've highlighted the circuits that I'll be using:

 

Wiring_Diagram_Color.jpg.fbfc08406b4be52a6b6d10bb5cb13a2c.jpg

 

 

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Fusible link should protect the system if things

go VERY wrong.

 

2002580954_2021-06-0318_21_16.jpg.e85c042da6447e7e49904acd0bd15710.jpg
Wiring is basic so I didn't worry about colors.
I mostly focused on using sufficiently heavy wires,

mostly 12-gauge, although the main feed is 10-gauge.

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On 5/31/2021 at 6:53 AM, JV Puleo said:

I'm in total agreement with Walt. To me, an "expert" is the person who, after years of study, realizes what he doesn't know.

Who was it that said what you don't know won't hurt you?  

 

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I'm kind of running out of things to do until I have the manifold gaskets (Monday or Tuesday) and the water pump. I finished the wiring, bought a battery, and made some 0-gauge battery cables. I did some continuity testing of my wiring and found a bad connection, so I replaced that--good to find it before it caused mischief. I also checked voltage at various places in the ignition system and was a little confused by one of the readings. It was 6 volts on both sides of the first coil but the second coil had 6 volts going in and 120 volts on the other side. Does that seem right? Bad coil? It's not hooked up backwards, I verified that. Or is it perhaps because one set of points might be open? Any thoughts?

 

6-5-21-3.jpg.bc86cabd2eea8edf714b78c1b96d4328.jpg  6-5-21-4.jpg.a853da9ea72ca4b8e318929aa51376d8.jpg
Power from the left coil is 6.0 volts, just like the rest of the system.

 

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Power from the right coil, however, is 120+ volts. Can that be right?

 

And remember these? I bought some of that 2000-degree gloss clear and sprayed all the manifolds with two coats so they'll be ready to install next week. The look pretty good. I hope it will hold up--I don't know if something out of a can will be durable. If I tune the engine properly the exhaust shouldn't get above 500 degrees and the ceramic coating should provide some insulation. I guess we'll find out.

 

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Manifolds will be ready to install.

 

So now what? I guess I'll put it in the air and pull the wheels and start looking at brakes and bearings.

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Look at your scale........MV, not V.

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Posted (edited)

It’s also going to make a difference if your points are open or closed. If they’re closed you’ll see something close to 6 V if they’re open you’ll probably see something like .046 V

 

That’s just the opposite if your points are open you’ll read 6 V from your switch to ground through your meter if they’re closed you’ll see some millivolts.

sorry

Edited by AB-Buff (see edit history)
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2 hours ago, edinmass said:

Look at your scale........MV, not V.

That was my initial thought but it's an auto ranging meter.

 

I've never worked or experience d dual coil setup but it's possible the second coil may have some residual stored energy, so that voltage maybe a reflection of it.

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You need to buy a Fluke, and a shielded unit for automobile and aircraft service. 

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2 hours ago, maok said:

That was my initial thought but it's an auto ranging meter.

 

I've never worked or experience d dual coil setup but it's possible the second coil may have some residual stored energy, so that voltage maybe a reflection of it.

Now that I have seen the pic on my laptop screen, it does say mVolts, so its reading 1.263Volts

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9 minutes ago, maok said:

Now that I have seen the pic on my laptop screen, it does say mVolts, so its reading 1.263Volts

No Mv is three decimal places .1263 volts 

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Oops, my mistake. I didn't realize it was auto-ranging. Nevertheless, what is it telling me? Bad coil? Or just leave it and see if it runs? Both coils are correctly connected.

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5 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

what is it telling me? Bad coil?

Matt you’re not reading anything through the coil. You’re reading through the points to ground. Or if the points are open then you’re seeing voltage coming from the coil. If you wanna read what’s going through the coil you’ll have to disconnect it from the distributor.

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On 6/4/2021 at 11:26 PM, aron_budapest said:

Anybody knows what is the equivalent product here is Europe? Evapo-rust is not available :(

Are you looking for something to clean the Motor cooling system and the radiator ? 

Do not use citric Acid powder. I did it once and it ended in a leaking water pump from the citrat which has been Build in the System. It was not possible the flush this out !

 But I had very good experience after this with a cooling System cleaner bought at my local Auto supply. I ran it three days in my car with lime free rain water on a longer weekend tour. Comming Home first thing was draining all the water out and open the drain plugs on the motor Block (1966 mopar 383 Cui)

and flushed it with clear water frome in the Garden hose. The result was much better then expected. Was not expensive at about 16€ and just needed two small bottles for the 17 liter cooling system capacity. Yes 17 liter when opening the drain plugs in the motor block.  I will have a look for name and brand when you are interested. 

 

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Yes I want to flush my engine and radiator together.My car is 1929 Chrysler 65.Engine cast iron, radiator copper. I found a Protec 1501 cooling system cleaner which is just an additive to coolant. Use it for 15 minutes at idle and all will be clean....too good to be true :)

 I wait to know your product name and the result with it.

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2 hours ago, AB-Buff said:

Matt you’re not reading anything through the coil. You’re reading through the points to ground. Or if the points are open then you’re seeing voltage coming from the coil. If you wanna read what’s going through the coil you’ll have to disconnect it from the distributor.

 

Thanks, Lynn. I think I was reading residual energy from the coil. That makes more sense. Ignition is still kind of a black magic thing for me. 

 

Today I installed the radiator, a job I had been putting off. There are still a few details to attend (such as a hole for the lower radiator hose and the fan belt) but I knew it would be a reasonably big job. The radiator is heavy as hell and after doing some measurements on the frame, I knew I'd have to add some blocks to raise it up to the appropriate level. I added some supports to help keep it upright, modifying the one on the passenger side to clear the water pump drive. It's secure, but I think I'll install one more brace on top since I don't know how much this thing is going to move around or vibrate once it's running. 

 

6-6-21-3.jpg.38f74273f83eb5c44beb23de2a99328d.jpg  6-6-21-6.jpg.81316ad3b1988a3f416418f6394c8295.jpg  6-6-21-1.jpg.0d9687cf1fca237aa4329eaa566c5697.jpg

Mounted the radiator and secured it to the base. That's $1800 worth of new

radiator, so I don't want to take any chances with it.

 

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Clearances are as close to what they'd be in the 

car as I could reasonably make them.

 

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Modified bracket to clear the water pump drive.

 

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Aftermarket temperature gauge bulb fits

perfectly in the radiator port.

 

Once the radiator was secure, I put the car up on some jack stands and removed the wheels. Eight giant 1-inch lug nuts on each corner. In back, the full floating axle ends made clearances between the wheel lip and the hub so tight that I couldn't use a standard thick-wall socket and had to use a light-duty thin one. It survived and the lug nuts came off without incident. Wheels popped off without much effort, too, which was a nice surprise. The brakes look like they belong on a city bus! I'm going to pull the brake drums and have a look around inside, although I don't expect any surprises there--the brakes were excellent that one time I drove it. I would like to re-pack the wheel bearings as well. The driver's side is a little tight and the drum doesn't spin by hand, but the passenger side spins easily, so obviously some adjustment will be needed. I'm wondering if I should have the drums turned while I have them off.

 

However, at the moment, I'm not quite sure how to remove the drums--there's a large central nut, then I'm assuming the drum can be removed like any other. Any advice there from those who are more familiar with such things than I?

 

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I'm assuming that if I remove the center nut, the

drum comes off, yes?

 

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Hub caps are a little beat up, so I'll  remove the emblems,

straighten them, then put them on the polishing

wheel to clean them up.

 

 

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Hi......DO NOT run that fan on the engine while running it up. It’s dangerous and unnecessary. Just use a good size house fan in front of the radiator. It allows you to listen to the engine and identify any noises that may need to be figured out. 

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I don't know specifically about your Lincoln, but as late as 1957 Fords had the front brake drums pressed onto the hub. To remove the drum, you pry off the grease cap then you remove a cotter pin and nut on the spindle. From there you carefully pull off the hub, drum, and bearings, being careful to not let the bearing fall out by holding it in place with your thumbs. The bearings should be held in place by a grease seal on the back side. By 1965 Ford changed to allow the front drums to be removed without pulling the hub. 

Hope this helps,

Lew Bachman

1957 Thunderbird Colonial White

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7 hours ago, aron_budapest said:

Yes I want to flush my engine and radiator together.My car is 1929 Chrysler 65.Engine cast iron, radiator copper. I found a Protec 1501 cooling system cleaner which is just an additive to coolant. Use it for 15 minutes at idle and all will be clean....too good to be true :)

 I wait to know your product name and the result with it.

 

Aron, Used two bottles of the Förch cleaner in clear water for three days and a few hundred kilometers. The result was unexpected good. 

F86D60D1-9A37-4E2D-A375-36B811E3568F.png

E14D7418-0887-4CA6-AC69-FFF242C2988A.jpeg

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19 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

 

 

443889718_2021-06-0615_51_40.jpg.ae29a0ec33c2eb33da766c5df3056b01.jpg

Hub caps are a little beat up, so I'll  remove the emblems,

straighten them, then put them on the polishing

wheel to clean them up.

 

 

If these caps are like most others of the period the outer shiny part is a very thin chrome plated piece of stamped brass that is stretched over a steel backer. I'd recommend hand polishing over the buffer... 

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Posted (edited)

Had some trouble finding a properly-sized collector for the temporary exhaust system. I went to Summit Racing and struck out because it's such an oddball size, so on the way home I stopped at my local O'Reilly's, which is connected to a distribution center (seriously, the building covers like three acres indoors). They let me go in the back and sort through the bins until I found just the right piece to make my test exhaust system. The outlet on the cast iron manifold collector is 2-5/8 inches but it has the bolt circle of a 3-inch collector, which is why the guy at Summit couldn't get it right--it doesn't look as big as it is.

 

6-8-21-7.jpg.97a83d4a1e0dbe8c7f2efe91e7cb0452.jpg  6-8-21-6.jpg.58650b960d06ae9117b157cc7a993393.jpg

Found the right collector at O'Reilly's Auto Parts. It isn't a perfect fit, but it's close enough.

 

6-8-21-4.jpg.476d71597e3d1ef202a396e0847c26f5.jpg

Some 3/8-inch bolts and it will snug up nicely.

 

I think I will use my original (broken and repaired) collector and the copper Olson's gaskets during testing, since I'll have to remove some of the manifolds to get the engine back in the chassis. If the collector is going to break during testing, I'd rather break the one that's already damaged and save the good one for the finished product. Same with the Remflex gaskets. Much as I hate exhaust leaks, during testing they're no big deal. 

 

The rest of my exhaust system consists of some 2.5-inch flex pipe and the cheapest muffler I could find at Summit Racing ($18). I welded the flex pipe to the collector and I'll weld the muffler to the flex pipe once I have the manifolds installed and the collector is positioned properly. I'm curious to hear how it sounds.

 

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Welded the collector to the flex pipe.

 

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Once the manifolds are installed, I'll attach the 

exhaust pipe and muffler to the test stand.

 

My Remflex gaskets should arrive tomorrow (Wednesday) and I'll start assembling the manifolds and aim towards installing the heads and top end of the engine this weekend. I should also have my generator back from the electrical shop--when I bought the car, I was told it was freshly rebuilt but, like many of the things I was told about this car, it was actually on the verge of failure. At least I don't have to worry about it again, which is important given how difficult it is to remove the generator on this car. It's getting very close to being ready to run.

 

Now where's my water pump...?

 

 

Edited by Matt Harwood (see edit history)
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Also, I sincerely hope the anonymous benefactor who sent us an awesome package the other day is reading this (you mentioned seeing the Lincoln T-shirt Melanie bought me). We received this very cool Auto Fono unit (similar to a Highway Hi-Fi) along with a very kind note that almost brought Melanie to tears. It was a fantastic gesture and we're incredibly grateful. I'd like to thank the person who sent it, but he or she didn't sign the note so I don't rightly know who to thank. So if you're reading this, THANK YOU! You really made our week here at Harwood Motors!

 

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How cool is this?

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Woohoo! Remflex gaskets are here! I even got a part number and application listing so anyone can buy these in the future. I have five sets, with two sets going to fellow Lincoln owners (they'll go out today or tomorrow) so I have two spares. I'll probably keep one for myself, leaving just one for another Lincoln. Very excited about this. I'll be installing the intake and exhaust manifold tonight.

 

20210609_121043.jpg.11677ad510959c148d02f3d2a78689db.jpg
Five sets of Lincoln K exhaust gaskets ready to go!

Note that I had them block off the exhaust crossover
port under the carb (it can easily be opened if needed).

 

20210609_121233.jpg.2e248f368f322d89ccdbe7bc089833b1.jpg

The set even has a part number and application listing.

 

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Posted (edited)
13 minutes ago, TexRiv_63 said:

So does this engine use a single exhaust outlet and muffler or is it a dual system? If single I'm surprised a V-12 would not have duals.

 

Single exhaust, but it's three inch pipe. I doubt the engine moves enough air for dual exhaust to make any difference. I'm running 2.5 inch tubing on the test stand, which should be plenty adequate for a low-RPM, low compression engine. The exhaust is on my list of things to replace, but not until everything else is sorted and it's running properly. The exhaust system isn't in bad shape, it just uses the wrong type and quantity of mufflers (one glasspack instead of two standard mufflers). Still sounds OK and isn't loud, but I want it silent. I may just change the muffler and add a second muffler in the back like I did on the '41 Limited.

 

 

Edited by Matt Harwood (see edit history)
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Installed all the manifolds this evening. No surprises, fairly straightforward. I used the Remflex gaskets everywhere but on the collector, which will probably have to be removed when we reinstall the engine in the chassis. I used the copper Olson gaskets there instead. Tomorrow I'll hook up the exhaust system and it'll be that much closer to being ready to run. 

 

6-9-21-3.jpg.bc6f03f53dda6a47dcb734f04627b382.jpg
New 3/8" studs for the manifolds. The ends of the

manifolds are secured with bolts.

 

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Intake and exhaust are installed as an assembly on each side. I installed

the original ball socket washers and nuts and torqued them to 30 ft.-lb.

 

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Crossover manifold and carburetor secured with

correct acorn nuts. I still need a new phenolic

spacer for the carb. Any idea where I  can find one?

 

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Remflex gasket compresses just enough to
seal even irregular surfaces.

 

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I used the copper Olson gaskets for the collector

manifold since I'll be removing it again later.

 

6-9-21-8.jpg.c33def66fbb26743c480d192ee63d3b9.jpg

And that's where I left it for tonight. I'll connect the

exhaust tomorrow then work on cylinder heads

this weekend.

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