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What is your favorite rust eater?


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You also want to be sure to get complete submersion as partial leaves a line where it meets the dry air.  I'm not sure how that may or may not affect the plating on the shell.  

Just man up and buy a bunch.  It lasts a very long time.  You'll find other uses for it.  Or sell the rest to one of your buddies for half off.  I'm betting it will look almost new as you aren't doing heavy rust removal.

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On 1/27/2020 at 3:45 PM, Roger Walling said:

Does Molasses De Grease as well?

 No. You must get the grease off first.

It will not remove paint well.

Roger , that molasses mix  is a great tip! I never would have thought. Thanks much! Only one question, does the part need to be neutralized after it comes out and if it does-what with? Can the mixture be used over again. 

I have a very large cattle galvanized water trough that has a drain off the side that will work great. Big enough and deep enough to completely submerge a couple of fenders at a time with no problem.

Edited by Pfeil (see edit history)
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I have been using a diluted molasses solution for years, its cheap and very effective. 

It can certainly be used many times over it just becomes less reactive and takes longer to remove the rust. 

Many years ago I had a set of very heavily rusted 20" disc wheels that I immersed for about  1 year in an old molasses solution.  I was not in a hurry as it was a major restoration and the wheels were not needed at the time.    I took the wheels out occasionally and hosed them down and gave them a clean with a wire brush, eventually they were 100% rust free the same as if they had been sand blasted.  The molasses solution was just about done by then.    If  holes appear it is because the rust had eaten through the steel.  Molasses does not attack the parent metal.

Molasses only removes rust not grease or paint and it is very slow .   It smells, so it needs to be well away from the house.

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2 hours ago, Pfeil said:

Roger , that molasses mix  is a great tip! I never would have thought. Thanks much! Only one question, does the part need to be neutralized after it comes out and if it does-what with? Can the mixture be used over again. 

 

 

You just have to wash it with water and dry immediately to prevent rust. Blow drying with a towel works well.

 A pressure washer works with out any light scrubbing.

 It can be used over and over again. And then disposed of on the ground or sewer.

 

 

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For parts too large to dip, wrap them in a couple of layers of paper towels.. and re-wet over a several hours, if needed. This keeps Evaporust in contact with parts and requires less material.

 

Evaporust has seen me thru 2 restorations!

 

 

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I have used electrolysis, molasses, Evaporust, navel jelly  and all will do the job if you work within the limitations of the process.  Electrolysis is the cheapest but you need a large container for most jobs and you have to be able to put an anode in the solution (I have a 55 gal drum).  Molasses as has been said it stinks and draws flies but it does work.  Navel jelly works and leaves a phosphoric coat but it is a lot of work.  Evaporust works and is reasonable priced but will flash rust and you need to keep it wet.  I use a kiddie wading pool and a fountain pump to keep large objects wet.  

 

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As promised here's the result of the 24 hr soak for the 4th emblem:

 

20200131_143144.thumb.jpg.7c7a74e3905ba242f50221e1b400ceec.jpg20200131_143206.thumb.jpg.9cd49a10b8615b74dc34b22599d8ca81.jpg

 

 

 

This last picture is of a 20's window crank that the chrome looked good to the eye when I threw it in but after an overnight soak the cracks in the plating showed up and it is quite weak now as far as adhering to the crank.  I would have described it as a driver quality piece before it went in.  

 

DSC_0086.thumb.JPG.b9846b21bf0a233e57d7f4ea11dcc3da.JPG

Edited by 3macboys (see edit history)
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22 hours ago, 3macboys said:

 

This last picture is of a 20's window crank that the chrome looked good to the eye when I threw it in but after an overnight soak the cracks in the plating showed up and it is quite weak now as far as adhering to the crank.  I would have described it as a driver quality piece before it went in.  

 

DSC_0086.thumb.JPG.b9846b21bf0a233e57d7f4ea11dcc3da.JPG

Pre WWII die cast will do this (and some post WWII) - the reality though is this part was well on its way to doing this before you ever touched it.  Time to recast !

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Matt, I have set up a system similar to yours and was about to put it together. Yours looks more thoughtful. I was going to just use enough to fill up the block and then recirculate that amount. You are using a bucket to allow more Evaporust, yes? Do you not change the fluid for days? Is it recirculating constantly?

Thanks, Jerry

Don't know how to reply to a specific post.

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15 minutes ago, Jerry with a Packard said:

Don't know how to reply to a specific post.

Hit the quote tab at the bottom of that post.

You can also highlight portions of that post and it will offer up a quote of just that highlight.

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57 minutes ago, John_Mereness said:

Pre WWII die cast will do this (and some post WWII) - the reality though is this part was well on its way to doing this before you ever touched it.  Time to recast !

This was another part that was a good test - the handle part that spins, was frozen, as was the echelon - but wanted to serve as a warning to others to maybe not tempt fate with those ones, as tough as it is, sometimes it's best to leave well enough alone.  

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Okay, I've already said I use and like EvapoRust, but I have a question: Will it hurt rubber? I have a couple of original tailpipe hangers. In very good shape, but with prominent surface rust...lot's of good metal left, though. The rubber bushings in the swivel part of the hanger look  great, but I don't know how old they are and they don't want to force them out of the sleeve and risk damaging them. I'd like to just drop both hangers in pan of EvapoRust and let them soak for a week or two, but not if the rubber will get hurt.

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Won’t touch anything but iron oxide, paint, copper, aluminum, brass, solder, absolutely nothing but the rust from cast iron or steel. The bond of non rusty ferrous metal is also left alone. That’s why this stuff is so good. 

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5 hours ago, Jerry with a Packard said:

Matt, I have set up a system similar to yours and was about to put it together. Yours looks more thoughtful. I was going to just use enough to fill up the block and then recirculate that amount. You are using a bucket to allow more Evaporust, yes? Do you not change the fluid for days? Is it recirculating constantly?

Thanks, Jerry

Don't know how to reply to a specific post.

 

My setup has been running pretty much non-stop for about two weeks now. Earlier this week, I added a heater and changed to a second 5-gallon bucket of Evapo-Rust, although the first was still amber and the second hasn't changed much at all over the past week. I think it's probably done working, although I'm going to let it run a little longer anyway. The heater keeps it running at 150 degrees all the time (the block is almost too hot to touch). The pump runs it down through the heads into the blocks, and then it drains back into the bucket where it recirculates. I figure about a  gallon is in the engine at any given time based on how much is left in the bucket.

 

Here's more detail:

 

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1 hour ago, edinmass said:

Won’t touch anything but iron oxide, paint, copper, aluminum, brass, solder, absolutely nothing but the rust from cast iron or steel. The bond of non rusty ferrous metal is also left alone. That’s why this stuff is so good. 

 

 

Thanks Ed.

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15 hours ago, JamesR said:

Okay, I've already said I use and like EvapoRust, but I have a question: Will it hurt rubber? I have a couple of original tailpipe hangers. In very good shape, but with prominent surface rust...lot's of good metal left, though. The rubber bushings in the swivel part of the hanger look  great, but I don't know how old they are and they don't want to force them out of the sleeve and risk damaging them. I'd like to just drop both hangers in pan of EvapoRust and let them soak for a week or two, but not if the rubber will get hurt.

If  the rubber part of the hangers is fabric impregnated, I would avoid the rubber/fabric part via soaking process as probably would not help, but do not know how it would dry and ...

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)
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1 hour ago, 34LaSalleClubSedan said:

Matt, what type of pump and heater are you using with your set up? Thanks, Jim

 

All the details are in my thread linked a few posts up from yours. I made a discovery today that it wasn't working correctly and made some adjustments.

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