victorialynn2

The End Of A Dream ~ Goodbye Spyder

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Today I accepted an offer on my dad’s garage that included the ‘63 Corvair. If it closes, the last of dad’s cars, excluding the ‘57 Skyliner will be gone. I had hoped to keep this one and get it running, but had to sacrifice it to ensure the contract was accepted. 

 

I had to take a deep deep breath and admit that the burdens of my fathers real estate expenses and the inconvenience of moving the car and parts, wasn’t worth it. I’ve lost enough time off work and the locals are getting tired of my relentless pleas for help. The positive is the contract doesn’t require me to do a lot of final cleanup that I thought I’d have to do. That is a huge relief. 

 

Now I’m one step closer to moving past all of this. I think my dad would have wanted me to be relieved of this burden. I feel like it just wasn’t meant to be for me to have this Spyder for some reason that only God and my father knows. Maybe it really is “Unsafe at any speed”. 😂

(Of course I’m kidding)

 

 

30A3825E-8E0D-4410-BEE8-2C799CCAC926.jpeg

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congratulations! you made a good decision. time to move onward and upward!

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I know you've dealt with a lot, a least you have the Skyliner and tons of good memories of your dad.  

 

p.s. Matt has a nice blue convertible Corvette for sale that would look nice next to the Skyliner. ;)

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Probably a wise decision on the Spyder.  The whole being able to walk away without the final clean up has alot of value as you mentioned. Plus you don't have to deal with moving the car , and parts or storing it. 

The Skyliner was probably the best of the crop and I bet you the one your Dad would have wanted to see you keep the most. 

Good luck on a quick close. 

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VL....you have done so much better than some in that situation and I am glad you are finally getting some relief from it all. I still have the lingering feeling that neither of my children will end up with my two 1931 Dodge coupes. My son does not care and my daughter hasn't the money or storage place to put them. We will see. Maybe my worrying is premature. It may work out eventually.

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John,

if its any consolation, my sons will bring in the scrapper and or throw my title collection in the fireplace.

 

we can t take it with us, so in the end- their loss.

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You’ve done an amazing job overseeing all of this. I know I couldn’t let stranger’s go through all my Dad’s stuff. It would have to be an auction with me not there.

This also, is extremely common⬇️
 

Boils my blood every time I see it. “Lost its garage space”, my rump. Loving family pushed it outside within weeks. I don’t do Craigslist searches anymore....

CDCE726E-DD1E-450F-A282-73AC0BDFD84A.jpeg

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Victoria, very glad to see that your ordeal is nearing an end.

You kept a great car and you will forever have the memories of your Father.

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1 hour ago, Ben P. said:

You’ve done an amazing job overseeing all of this. I know I couldn’t let stranger’s go through all my Dad’s stuff. It would have to be an auction with me not there.

This also, is extremely common⬇️
 

Boils my blood every time I see it. “Lost its garage space”, my rump. Loving family pushed it outside within weeks. I don’t do Craigslist searches anymore....

 

I know what you mean.

Over the years I have seen countless ads where someone is selling their dad's or grandfather's car with the note - we're not car people.  🤬

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13 hours ago, victorialynn2 said:

the burdens of my fathers real estate expenses and the inconvenience of moving the car and parts...

...only God and my father knows.

 

How good to know that you had the love and strength

to take care of your father's needs.  "Inasmuch as ye have

done it unto the least of these my brethren, ye have

done it unto me."

 

Sometimes the higher sense of things is refreshing

and satisfying when nothing else is.

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2 hours ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

 

How good to know that you had the love and strength

to take care of your father's needs.  "Inasmuch as ye have

done it unto the least of these my brethren, ye have

done it unto me."

 

Sometimes the higher sense of things is refreshing

and satisfying when nothing else is.

Agree 100%

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Thanks guys. You all have been such a source of strength and really helped me cope with all of this. I’m very grateful for my car buddies. 🤗

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8 hours ago, Laughing Coyote said:

I know you've dealt with a lot, a least you have the Skyliner and tons of good memories of your dad.  

 

p.s. Matt has a nice blue convertible Corvette for sale that would look nice next to the Skyliner. ;)

I wish as my dad had Corvettes when I was young and I love them. I will not receive enough after splitting with my two sisters to purchase that, or really anything. My sisters on the east coast have not been able/willing to help with any of this, but I know my father wants them to have something from him, as he put in his will before, of course, we knew how this would all play out. I could go after more in light of the circumstances, but I won’t. 

 

If I’d have been able to sell quickly all at once after he passed, and not lost over 4 years of income, I would have realized more. However, my only concern was that he was taken care of, which is what all of this was for, and that did happen. So for that I’m satisfied, even though this has been a major financial setback for me and has caused me a lot of financial stress in the process. Top ramen and pinching pennies has been the norm at times during all this to keep his bills paid. 

 

I’m very grateful if I am able to keep the ‘57 and that has not always been assured and still isn’t, but hopeful. 🤞

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The last clean up is the hardest .

Mother in law had a card table of full or partly full prescription pills.

If they have been opened the Cops wont pick them up.

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1 minute ago, Isaiah said:

The last clean up is the hardest .

Mother in law had a card table of full or partly full prescription pills.

If they have been opened the Cops wont pick them up.

I will still have the house to clean out and sell, but i can see the finish line. I also have a roomful if photos and trinkets that are sentimental to someday go through. I will know when the time is right, but getting Texas done will be a huge burden lifted. 

 

I tell myself that all the struggles, financially, emotionally and physically are preparing me to let go of his possessions. The relief of getting this done will out weight the sense of loss. The Spyder is one example of that. 

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58 minutes ago, victorialynn2 said:

I will still have the house to clean out and sell, but i can see the finish line. I also have a roomful if photos and trinkets that are sentimental to someday go through. I will know when the time is right, but getting Texas done will be a huge burden lifted. 

 

I tell myself that all the struggles, financially, emotionally and physically are preparing me to let go of his possessions. The relief of getting this done will out weight the sense of loss. The Spyder is one example of that. 

 

It takes time to deal with everything and all the loose ends and you did a commendable job.

It takes time to heal.

 

It took me a year before I put my dad's cars in my name and I only did it then because the registrations needed to be renewed and a very nice lady at the DMV walked me through the entire process when I went in to renew the registration on cars I didn't yet own.

She encouraged me to take the final step and put the cars in my name.

A step I avoided because it was like erasing from this world that one final piece of my Dad.

They were no longer Dad's cars.  They were mine, and although I always knew someday I would own them, I just wasn't ready for it to be so soon.

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23 minutes ago, zepher said:

 

It takes time to deal with everything and all the loose ends and you did a commendable job.

It takes time to heal.

 

It took me a year before I put my dad's cars in my name and I only did it then because the registrations needed to be renewed and a very nice lady at the DMV walked me through the entire process when I went in to renew the registration on cars I didn't yet own.

She encouraged me to take the final step and put the cars in my name.

A step I avoided because it was like erasing from this world that one final piece of my Dad.

They were no longer Dad's cars.  They were mine, and although I always knew someday I would own them, I just wasn't ready for it to be so soon.

The last time I registered the ‘57, I could have put it in my name or both. I kept it in his name, so I understand. 

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I'm glad you are finishing this chapter, finally, Victoria!

My Grandpa meant a lot to me. When he died it took 6 auctions to sell all of his property. I went to 3 of them -- more of a farewell than to buy. All I came away with was an old umbrella I bought for $10. He had a similar # of cars. None were inherited by any of the relatives, and the deal was all the auction items, from a radiator ornament to 480 acres of land, had to be purchased as any other regular bidder would. Then if we bought a 1910 Buick Raceabout or a 1936 Buick Century we would get a kickback of 50% from the auctioneer after it was over. Didn't work well for me, but everything got sold off. I guess that was the point.

---- Jeff

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)
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I know it's a bittersweet occasion for you, Victoria, but your father is looking down and smiling at you.  He appreciates all you've done.  I hope it works out that you get to keep the 1957 Skyliner.

 

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2 hours ago, Mark McAlpine said:

I know it's a bittersweet occasion for you, Victoria, but your father is looking down and smiling at you.  He appreciates all you've done. 

 

He was so worried for me. I put up a good front for him, but I was shaking inside. (He knew). The truth is, and I can only now admit this as I see the end in sight, that this came close to destroying me. The stress of it all has affected me pretty badly. I’m hoping I recover once it’s all over.  

 

I know it could have gone so much worse, so many times. Somehow I held on by the thinnest thread, thanks to people I met along the way. (I had no substantial help from people I knew before this happened, aside from an ex boyfriend I hadn’t seen in 15+ years, who accompanied me on a few of the first trips and helped with some manual labor early on.)

 

It’s still so scary, but once the garage sells, my dad will be solvent again, and consequently, so will I, as long as my new business continues to succeed. I am in awe at how I have had enough business to survive and not so much that I couldn’t juggle my responsibilities to my father. I am convinced that it is a blessing from God and my father. The business is also helping me feel like I have a purpose again, helping others. 

 

I told myself many times that if I did the right thing, somehow it all would work out, even though I couldn’t see how. It’s hard to trust in blind faith, but I really had no other choice. 

Edited by victorialynn2 (see edit history)
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VL 2-  Isn't it great to see the light at the end of the tunnel and know it;s not a freight train!  You have been an amazing daughter to your ailing father not many in your generation would have done. He may not have had the ability to express his feelings for your help and concerns but I am positive he was very grateful. You have the 57 and great memories so hold on to those and forget about all the hard times that got you to this point. Just know they made you a better person and enjoy a happy successful future. 

Have fun

Dave S 

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9 minutes ago, SC38DLS said:

 He may not have had the ability to express his feelings for your help and concerns but I am positive he was very grateful. 

Have fun

Dave S 

Thank you. At the very end of his life, when he could barely talk, the words he did say were “Thank You”. I am not sure that he even knew what he was thanking me for, maybe just for being there. I do know that he would have appreciated all my efforts.

 

Also he probably (definitely), would have offered criticism about what I could have done better, because that’s how he was. He expected a lot out of himself as well as others. 

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He was thanking you for being an awesome person.

 

I thank my wife all the time, even when she does nothing, because her mere presence in the world makes things better. I think you're probably cut from the same cloth.

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VL,

 

Knowing that you did "the right thing" despite the personal toll is the ultimate reward. While our journey was (is) not as laborious as yours seems to have been, we can appreciate, and laud the effort. Caring for aging parents, and then the residual tasks, can be taxing beyond expectation. Hopefully we offer an example for the next generation.

 

We know you had wished to retain the Spider. Our current Corvair Monza convertible brings back memories or our four previous Corvair Corsa and Monza versions. We are simply caretakers in so many ways - vehicles, family, ---

KELLY CORVAIR LEFT FRONT.jpg

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3 hours ago, Marty Roth said:

VL,

 

Knowing that you did "the right thing" despite the personal toll is the ultimate reward. While our journey was (is) not as laborious as yours seems to have been, we can appreciate, and laud the effort. Caring for aging parents, and then the residual tasks, can be taxing beyond expectation. Hopefully we offer an example for the next generation.

 

We know you had wished to retain the Spider. Our current Corvair Monza convertible brings back memories or our four previous Corvair Corsa and Monza versions. We are simply caretakers in so many ways - vehicles, family, ---

KELLY CORVAIR LEFT FRONT.jpg

Beautiful car. 💕

 

I don’t want to come across ungrateful at all, and hope I don’t. I am also relieved that I don’t have to do as much clean up. 

 

In the end I’d just rather have more pieces of him than money in the bank. ❤️

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