1950panhead

1932 Duesenberg J490X, Coachwork in the Style of Derham

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3 hours ago, mercer09 said:

some of those "sedans" were chopped down into pickups and used on pig farms...........

 

 

My step-grandfather, who ran a scrap yard before and during the war claimed to have scrapped "more than one" Duesenberg. I'm not sure he was remembering things correctly and I'd be horrified to learn that it was more than one or even one. Some were surely lost to scrapping during the war, but I'm sure the number wasn't huge. These were still big, expensive, prestigious cars that were only a few years old. I think the "restorers" and "collectors" of the '50s and '60s did a lot more damage to Duesenberg stock than scrapping did.

 

Now as far as making trucks out of big sedans, yes, that happened a lot and I'm OK with that. In fact, I'm on the hunt for my next vehicle: a Full Classic wrecker, something like this Cadillac (this topic is under discussion in another thread around here somewhere):

 

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All that said, sign me up for a "bitsa" or "rebodied" or "unpedigreed" Duesenberg J at a 50-80% discount. Matching-numbers fever is ridiculous at any level. Would a rose by any other name smell as sweet?

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1 hour ago, Matt Harwood said:

 

My step-grandfather, who ran a scrap yard before and during the war claimed to have scrapped "more than one" Duesenberg. I'm not sure he was remembering things correctly and I'd be horrified to learn that it was more than one or even one. Some were surely lost to scrapping during the war, but I'm sure the number wasn't huge. These were still big, expensive, prestigious cars that were only a few years old. I think the "restorers" and "collectors" of the '50s and '60s did a lot more damage to Duesenberg stock than scrapping did.

 

 

I wouldn't sweat it Matt.   About 99.5% of the time when somebody outside the hard core hobby calls something a Duesenberg,  it is almost always a Buick.

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3 minutes ago, alsancle said:

 

I wouldn't sweat it Matt.   About 99.5% of the time when somebody outside the hard core hobby calls something a Duesenberg,  it is almost always a Buick.

 

LOL! That makes me feel better.

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While my daughter was attending St. Lawrence University, up in the north country, I established a pretty good friendship with old Mr. Mace. Had I maintained the relationship I probably would have ended up with one of his cars.  My gourmong taste in cars would have handled it just fine.

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alsuncle --

 

Are you sure about a car being built around an engine rescued from a boat? I knew the late Bill Bocock of Kerrville, Texas, and he told me that he had found and bought a Model J engine out of a shrimp boat in Panama. He rebuilt the engine and mounted it on a display stand, and did intend to build a car around it, but never did. He told me he wasn't happy with the replica chassis he had purchased. Upon Bill's death that engine was donated to the ACD Museum and is still there -- I heard that it's going to be put into a chassis for museum display purposes. 

 

Was there another engine that came out of a boat?

 

I also heard that a Model J engine was rescued from a sawmill in a small town in East Texas maybe 40-50 years ago, but don't know what happened to that one. A number of Texas car collectors were aware of the engine back in the day, but everyone was a cheapo bargain hunter back then. 10 years ago I even saw the deteriorated building that the engine came out of, but the owner's elderly widow had no idea what had become of the engine.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Yes, The roadster almost had me. They were 1980 ish vintage. In Canton, New York, Mace Motors, formerly an Olds dealership. The collection has been dispersed. My favorite was the repro Auburn. Ford LTD underneath.

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The custom Cord was interesting. It may have had a history that had been forgotten, but important.

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The buildings at three locations were loaded.

 

The first time I stopped I was alone after delivering my daughter's car to her. I stopped into the cluttered showroom and met the father and son. They had a Cars & Parts magazine on the table with a hood ornament test as an article. Mr. Mace senior handed it to me and told me to take the test. Then he said "You know about cars, don't you? Has anyone told you what's in the shop?" Didn't have any idea but it was a gasp when we walked out. After that I stopped every time. He just let me look around and gave me directions to the other locations. Once my wife was with me and he had to leave. He told her "If you have any questions just ask him" and pointed at me. "Pull the door tight when you leave."  My wife said she knew I had all the answers and they both smiled with great tolerance.

 

Neat place, good memories.

Gourmong is the opposite of gourmet, I don't think Google knows.

Bernie

 

 

Edited by 60FlatTop (see edit history)

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Wow - it's been quite a while since I thought of that place.

 

(It's "gourmand,"  and not exactly opposite, more the blue collar counterpart.  Likes food, not just refined food.)

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That's what happens when the Irish grow up with Italian car dealers and marries a Danish woman with a French and English major. Concept applies to my taste in cars for sure.

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1 hour ago, jrbartlett said:

alsancle --

 

Are you sure about a car being built around an engine rescued from a boat?

 

 

No.   Hearsay from my dad who was Ted's best friend.   I worked at the shop when I was a kid but only at the very tail end of the Duesenberg production.

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The interesting thing today.......four door phaetons, D/C, are now not the "top of the list"  as they were back in the 60's and 70's. It's all about the roadster and convertible  coupe. For me, I prefer the D/C over all others........times change and so does taste.......I rather have fun with another couple in the car, and rumble seats are getting harder and harder to get in every year. Frankly, a real tourister for the money of 1.25 is a fantastic bargain.........that said, the LeBaron D/C will bring a lot more today........in a few more years things will change again.....they always do. I really like the fit and finish of closed cars.

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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Ed, John  P held onto his Lebaron Barrelside when he sold the tourster (imho Lebaron has much better colors, and ran well) which by numbers I think should be the lesser car but your comments on value are really interesting.  Also roadster vs. DCP, exactly my point, kind of a head scratcher, but it is what it is, for now!

Edited by Steve_Mack_CT (see edit history)

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Ed, I agree with you. In an open car I like something with 4 doors or if a 2 door a convertible victoria, I am not a rumble seat car guy at all. Look nice but you have to be no older then a nimble 12 year old to easily climb in and out of one. I too like the fit and finish of closed car. Town cars are my favorite body style but I don't fit behind the wheel of any one of them well at all due to long legs. Chauffeurs were not tall people as the owners of the cars wanted the room in the back for them not up front for the driver. In NY City there were fraternal organizations for chauffeurs too - Had their own clubs by country of origin - Irish, Norwegian, German. they advertised their existence in car publications that were specific to people who drive vehicles "National Taxicab and Motor bus Weekly" was one of them. they had club houses in NY City where there was some lodging and also places for a shower or a clean up between long hauls behind the wheel.

SO why do I recall all of this stuff clearly and can't remember what day I am supposed to go to the dentist without looking at a calendar?  😯  OK all of you that know me can stop snickering .

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4 hours ago, bryankazmer said:

Wow - it's been quite a while since I thought of that place.

 

(It's "gourmand,"  and not exactly opposite, more the blue collar counterpart.  Likes food, not just refined food.)

 

 

Sorta quality vs quantity opposite.  Gourmet implies high-quality, maybe exotic, food which may be small portion - gourmand implies food which may be just "meat-and-potatoes" but plenty of it.

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Gourmet or gourmand...................where I come from the nomenclature is connoisseur..............in my family  we drop the con, and just go with the sewer. That’s what happens when you grow up on the wrong side of the tracks! 😝

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Gourmet and Gourmand have same root. Simply, Gourmet means the art of prepared fine food and drink, and the Gourmand is the person who favors Gourmet food. Of course over time, Gourmand has been bastardized in modern lingo to include gluttons, but that is not it's root.  

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On 1/23/2020 at 2:23 PM, Walt G said:

😯E ...I am not a rumble seat car guy at all. Look nice but you have to be no older then a nimble 12 year old to easily climb in and out of one... 

 

There are some exceptions! Back in 2010 I was at the ACD festival in Auburn, and met an older fella by the name of Everett Kuhn. He told me that he had just sold his last ACD automobile, and this would be the first time in 50 some years that he would be viewing the parade from a lawn chair instead of from inside an ACD car. So I offered him a ride in my 29 Model J Murphy convertible coupe, figuring that he would be riding in the front seat with me. But no, he insisted on riding in the rumble seat. With a couple of us around him to catch him if he fell, Everett stepped onto the running board, and up onto the fender step, and into the rumble seat. He was 95 years old at the time!

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By the way, Hemi Joel, you're my hero. The videos of you running that J like a real car and just having a great time with it are AWESOME! Thanks for sharing the fun.

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What Matt said, are these still out on youtube?  Nice to see someone wrench on a Model J like I do with the Model A! 😁

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On 1/23/2020 at 10:27 AM, alsancle said:

 

I wouldn't sweat it Matt.   About 99.5% of the time when somebody outside the hard core hobby calls something a Duesenberg,  it is almost always a Buick.

I hate to think how many people over the years have asked me if my Cadillac was a RR

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Matt, thanks for the kind words!  I like to share my Model J as much as possible because back before I had it, Duesenbergs seemed so inaccessible. Always behind ropes in museums, never seen at any local shows. I wanted to see under the hood, crawl underneath, see up close what makes them so legendary,  hear it run, listen to it roar if someone were to take it out and floor it! The golden rule now applies. 

 

Steve, the videos are still there, Hemi Joel on Youtube. I need to make some more. Hopefully 2020 will be the year for that. 

 

Joe, I have had the same issue! My son and I had the Deusey to a show at Jefferson Wisconsin, and a teenager came running towards us from about a block away. When he got within hollering distance he started yelling with great exuberance "is that a Rolls Royce, is that a Rolls Royce, IS THAT A ROLLS ROYCE?!!" When he got up to the car my son said "it's a Duesenberg" The kids head just dropped, and he said in a disappointed voice "I thought it was a Rolls Royce" and slowly moped away. Well, at least he was passionate about a great marque. Now whenever my son sees the car, he taunts me: "Is that a Rolls Royce?"

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Over lunch today I watched the video of the car on a country road that was posted on YouTube.  The camera man swung down on the spedo but I couldn't read it. So...curiousity is killing me.  How fast was it? Oh how I would have loved to be along for the ride! That looks like a great car. I admire your willingness to drive it and share it.

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14 year old camera operator, he was just learning.   It just touched 70, then I slowed down. It's so fun to drive, like I'm sure all Duesenbergs are. 

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On 1/23/2020 at 10:57 AM, 60FlatTop said:

 

 

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As my friends plunge daggers into me or saying this - I kind of would like to have one of these replicars 

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