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This is Just Wrong!


capngrog
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While watching the B-J Auction the other night,  I almost snorted my beer when a "patina-wrapped" vehicle came across the block.  Here's an example of the look:

 

image.png.f1bd461139fa4c7fd3f6fd34d7713240.png

 

Talk about taking a trend and over doing it!  Patina is O.K. on certain vehicles, but it has to be real.  What's next, a patina wrap on a brand new C-8 Corvette?

 

Maybe it's just me. 

 

End of rant.

 

Cheers,

Grog

 

 

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To each his own, but to me patina is cancer, it needs to be cut out. If you clear coat it, you still have rust under your clear coat. Do we paint over rust? Not me. And to make a wrap of rust, I'll just say, not in my garage. I like fresh shinny paint.

 

Maybe I should have just clear coated all this beautiful rust. (And note no big holes in it, it is a Texas car, we don't allow rust in Texas.)

 

zCAM05645g.jpg.9c2b6534c0a0c948df6bbcc856c81803.jpg

 

 

 

 

.

 

 

Edited by Michael-Restomod (see edit history)
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2 hours ago, capngrog said:

Patina is O.K. on certain vehicles, but it has to be real.

I'm with you one hundred percent.  Patina is earned over a long productive life, not bought by the yard.  Was it Barnum that said a fool is born every minute.  Who would buy something like that?

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This article was from 2007. They went so far as to create fake rust holes in the fiberglass body and apply rust dust from an old water main. 🙄

 

https://www.hotrod.com/articles/hdrp-0704-1937-ford-patina-three-window/

 

hdrp_0704_rat_10b_z-1937_ford_rat_rod-pahrdp_0704_rat_11_z-1937_ford_rat_rod-pat

 

It also has a faux Ardun... (I'm still struggling with why you want to run an LS motor that is so ugly that you have to put a fake nose and glasses on it to disguise it).

 

hrdp_0704_rat_08_z-1937_ford_rat_rod-pat

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4 minutes ago, jpage said:

I don't personally understand what the big deal is about "patina". Personally, the rust and wear only looks like an old ratty car to me! Nobody ever describes a worn, dirty , paint peeling house as having a "nice patina"!

 

Antique furniture that has worn original finish is worth much more than if it's been stripped and refinished. I'm not saying that this should apply to cars also, but your analogy has flaws.

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Let's give this some thought...... Finished car value, $25,000. Restoration costs $70,000. Skipping the body/ paint stage saves $30,000. Cost of wrap $1,000? Everybody on here pokes fun at people wanting 70K for a car worth 25K. A wrap with patina and an old racing number/look, sounds like a smart approach to save some coin on cars with low finished values. And if you are on the front line of a new trend, you will make as much on the car with a wrap, if done right. A few years from now the wraps, will be a wrap.🤔 

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45 minutes ago, Xander Wildeisen said:

Let's give this some thought...... Finished car value, $25,000. Restoration costs $70,000. Skipping the body/ paint stage saves $30,000. Cost of wrap $1,000? Everybody on here pokes fun at people wanting 70K for a car worth 25K. A wrap with patina and an old racing number/look, sounds like a smart approach to save some coin on cars with low finished values. And if you are on the front line of a new trend, you will make as much on the car with a wrap, if done right. A few years from now the wraps, will be a wrap.🤔 

You make some good points, Xander. But we do vehicle wraps in my shop, and there is no way we could even buy the material for a grand. People see our work and come zipping into our office quite often on a whim, and ask us things like, "How much to make my whole van look like a helmet for the _______ ?" (insert favorite NFL team here) My brother once made his girlfriends' van look like a P-40 of Flying Tigers fame, and that brought lots of people into the shop. But when we tell them to figure 4-5 grand for starters, it usually sends them packing. 

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Does not surprise me on the cost, was just throwing out a number. I do like the wraps, have seen some pretty cool looking designs. Watched some people doing a wrap on a car at the SEMA show. It does not just go on in a few minutes. The patina wraps would look better in a flatter gloss. The high shine gives it a clear coat look. I would do one, would have to be the right car. Lots of cool things that can be done on these cars. Might be awhile before we see a wrapped Duesenberg.😀

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34 minutes ago, Xander Wildeisen said:

Does not surprise me on the cost, was just throwing out a number. I do like the wraps, have seen some pretty cool looking designs. Watched some people doing a wrap on a car at the SEMA show. It does not just go on in a few minutes. The patina wraps would look better in a flatter gloss. The high shine gives it a clear coat look. I would do one, would have to be the right car. Lots of cool things that can be done on these cars. Might be awhile before we see a wrapped Duesenberg.😀

Xander, 

You sure are right about the fantastic wraps on SEMA show vehicles. My brother and I used to come there on set-up day (Monday), and put graphics on our clients' pickup trucks on the show floor (Roll-N-Lock tonneau covers). After he was finished, we would wander around and sometimes watch other pro's installing wraps.

 

I totally agree on the gloss on that Caddy. Indeed, the opposite seems to be a trend around here. A graphics professional that we know bought a brand new sporty car in beautiful bright red paint, and immediately brought it to us to wrap with flat blue vinyl. This guy is a pro himself, and needed us to print the vinyl and help him install it. He explained that he wanted it to catch the attention of younger car guys in our area. Personally, I didn't understand it at all, because it merely looked to me like a car with paint damage, or a car that someone had tried to change the color of with rattle cans. But, whatever!  

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Only car I did a complete wrap on was for a color change to make it match the rest of the fleet and was a good value because of how I bought the car in the first place.  The big but is 3 to 4 yrs later of sun baked time  trying to remove the wrap without damaging the paint.   On a fleet vehicle not a bid deal but collector car yikes!  Side note why does every "patina" finish have the same green or blue base to it?

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Honestly, all these rusty or pseudo rusty cars look awful. Better not the newest, but brilliant. I would not say that this is just rubbish, but frankly, such a “beauty” deserves a place at the guys from https://junkcarsus.com/, and not at an exhibition or in a collection. It looks too bad, I hope no offense subtle feelings)

Edited by DeadInsider (see edit history)
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Just now, Steve_Mack_CT said:

Nice paint on Caddy, wonder if wrap helps preserve or ruin it?

 

 

I read or heard that new cars are getting wraps for stone chip prevention. Drive if for a few years, pull the wrap any you have a perfect original paint job. Bob 

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In the early 1970s Cadillac had a clear coat that they would spray the bottom of the sides of their new cars with from a body molding down to the bottom edge. It too was to prevent stone chips from the road surface. . When I hear of it I got some and sprayed the underside of the fenders of my pre war car with it as we had just finished the lacquer paint job on that car. It worked well, easily let you wipe off any road muck including tar with very little effort.

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There are special films made for protection from stone chips. They are clear and are usually just put over the high-risk surfaces of a vehicle, such as the front area around a grille, and other high impact locations. 

 

Putting a wrap on a car the right way is a laborious project which requires a lot of skill, an indoor place with good temperature control, no wind, and an experienced helper. Taking it off is a total pain in the, er….neck. 

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