Hudsy Wudsy

Right Hand Drive Cars in US -- How Do You Value Them?

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I have heard the same thing is true with L.H.D. market British cars that have been re - exported back to the U.K. Usually the parts to make them R.H.D. are readily available and in most cases a true bolt in.  And in most cases the swap is done, but the data plate usually identifies them as a L.H.D. market car. And a drop in market value.

 

Greg in Canada

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3 hours ago, mercer09 said:

very grateful for narrow minded individuals..........gives me better deals.

 

They are a beacon on the road that leads nowhere. Those good deals are their legacy.

 

On the RHD, I have driven some that were owned by others. They were enjoyable in their uniqueness. Visibility was not a dramatic issue. It is important to drive defensively and be able to predict a dangerous situation. If the deal came along I would exploit the negatives and buy one, but it would have to be a big car for me.

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Hi All

Well this is an interesting discussion. As an owner of an RHD in a LHD here is one owner’s perspective.

First, a thank you to Gill for the complement on my ’15 Ford Canadian RHD roadster.

Here in Nova Scotia, we drove on the left side of the road up to 1923 before switching over as did the neighbouring provinces. Ford Canada built both LHD and RHD for the Canadian markets and early on also for Australia and the UK. So for me, locating and restoring a local RHD model was high on the desirability list. I’m not the only one in the area either as there are around a half dozen or more restored RHD Ts.

So for me it was worth a small premium to acquire a RHD even when living in a LHD world. However since I live in a busy area and want to drive on the road, I did add electric brake and turn signals to the car for visibility before ever leaving the drive way.

As to the RHD vs LHD value. As with real estate, location, location, location. RHD Ts are the odd ball and sometimes less desirable model in North America. However take that same car to the UK (or perhaps Australia) where the values for Ts is higher to start with (then here anyway) and I expect that a ready to run RHD T would attract a premium over a similar LHD model in a RHD market.

The market location says it all. The LHD E Type Jaguar is more desirable here than an RHD model, but take the same car to the UK and the relative value will be reversed.

So the like most of the collector car market, location and the eye of the beholder is a big part of the perceived and market value of any car by purchaser.

Drive Safe

Jeff

Nova Scotia

Canada

Ford 15 Fall Pic.jpg

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Here in  Australia, over the years many LHD vehicles have been imported from the states, and once a pond a time, most states required all LHD vehicles to be converted to RHD but that changed IIRC in the late '80s 0r '90s. It seems there isn't (if at all) price differential between the two these days. I always prefer a RHD version.

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Thanks for sharing Jeff. That's a great looking roadster ! I hope my speedster ends up being 1/2 as nice when done. Any spare parts ? I have a R.H.D. aluminum hogs head but no pedals yet. Is your lower steering column bracket casting iron ? I have a brass one but I am reasonably sure it is a reproduction. The bracket that supports the steering column 

shaft and control rods and attaches the steering to the frame.

 

Greg in Canada, but the other coast.

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You could sell them to mail men!

 

 

John Ratzenberger

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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9 hours ago, maok said:

Here in  Australia, over the years many LHD vehicles have been imported from the states, and once a pond a time, most states required all LHD vehicles to be converted to RHD but that changed IIRC in the late '80s 0r '90s. It seems there isn't (if at all) price differential between the two these days. I always prefer a RHD version.


Living in Australia, I have had as everyday drive car a ‘64 Buick Skylark in LHD format. Sure, overtaking and some intersections area bit difficult but everything else is fine. Getting out kerbside is safer too! My current ‘63 Riviera is also LHD. No problem.

 

 My only issue with RHD conversions is how well they have been done as you do hear horror stories of how they scrub tyres and turn more to one side than the other, or the  steering arm hits the sump on full lock LH turns.

 

For what it is worth I would suggest looking at  the chain drive conversion be as the best option as all of the steering geometry remains factory standard. I drove a friends ‘78 Cadillac Coupe de Ville in both LHD and RHD format with this conversion and could not detect a difference. 

 

Sure RHD is a bit easier,, just my two bobs worth

Rodney 😀😀😀😀😀😀😀
 

 

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10 hours ago, nsbrassnut said:

Hi All

 

Well this is an interesting discussion. As an owner of an RHD in a LHD here is one owner’s perspective.

 

First, a thank you to Gill for the complement on my ’15 Ford Canadian RHD roadster.

 

Here in Nova Scotia, we drove on the left side of the road up to 1923 before switching over as did the neighbouring provinces. Ford Canada built both LHD and RHD for the Canadian markets and early on also for Australia and the UK. So for me, locating and restoring a local RHD model was high on the desirability list. I’m not the only one in the area either as there are around a half dozen or more restored RHD Ts.

 

So for me it was worth a small premium to acquire a RHD even when living in a LHD world. However since I live in a busy area and want to drive on the road, I did add electric brake and turn signals to the car for visibility before ever leaving the drive way.

 

As to the RHD vs LHD value. As with real estate, location, location, location. RHD Ts are the odd ball and sometimes less desirable model in North America. However take that same car to the UK (or perhaps Australia) where the values for Ts is higher to start with (then here anyway) and I expect that a ready to run RHD T would attract a premium over a similar LHD model in a RHD market.

 

The market location says it all. The LHD E Type Jaguar is more desirable here than an RHD model, but take the same car to the UK and the relative value will be reversed.

 

So the like most of the collector car market, location and the eye of the beholder is a big part of the perceived and market value of any car by purchaser.

 

Drive Safe

 

Jeff

 

Nova Scotia

 

Canada

 

Ford 15 Fall Pic.jpg

Here is the 1917 Studebaker display in Vancouver, where there are both LHD and RHD vehicles.  British Columbia officially drove on the right in 1920 or 1921.   I wouldn't be surprised of both LHD and RHD cars were also available concurrently in Nova Scotia as well.

 

Craig

 

39d30c4e-a695-4c2d-9b8e-42d1aaaa3577-A17

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7 hours ago, JamesR said:

You could sell them to mail men!

 

 

John Ratzenberger

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I bet this Saturn wagon was his:

Studebaker also offered the Lark 'Rural Router' in RHD configuration and Subaru also offered RHD cars for USPS drivers.  And so does Jeep today.

 

It is nice to see someone saving these 1951 and 1952 Studebaker RHD cars:

 

https://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/forum/your-studebaker-forum/general-studebaker-specific-discussion/93221-rural-mail-studebakers?90995-Rural-Mail-Studebakers=

 

Craig

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I was a 35 year rural mail carrier, I never used a RHD vehicle. I found them to be too cumbersome in trying to do my work. A coworker used a RHD Subaru and preferred that as he was a very short person. As I stated earlier in this thread I would like to find an RHD  Model A Phaeton.

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Used to have a RHD MGA. Gave the passenger a steering wheel to wave around at appropriate times.

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My next project will be a TR2 retrofitted to be RHD.  All necessary parts have been collected over the years.

 

Why?  For the hell of it.  Why not?

 

If I hate it when its done, easy enough to change back.  

Edited by Zimm63 (see edit history)

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6 hours ago, 8E45E said:

I bet this Saturn wagon was his:

Studebaker also offered the Lark 'Rural Router' in RHD configuration and Subaru also offered RHD cars for USPS drivers.  And so does Jeep today.

 

 

 

I had no idea that Saturn, Subaru and Studebaker offered RHD mail vehicles. Thanks for the education. I'll keep that in mind as I peruse the old car ads.

 

The Jeeps were the only small USPS vehicles used around here, as far as I can remember. Now they use a sort of industrial looking small van...I wouldn't call it a mini van, but it's about that size, only very angular. Don't know if it's made by Jeep or not. 

 

The old USPS Jeeps they used around here we available for public  purchase as surplus after they were worn out by the post office. As used Jeeps, they almost kind of seemed to have a counter-culture appeal in the '90's the way the VW Bug did in the '60's,  but they never caught on like the Bug did. They weren't as practical, I'm guessing. Don't know what the top speed was, but I wouldn't want to take one on the highway.

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Grumman also made mail trucks.

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Hi Greg

 

I have the same problem. A spare RHD aluminum hogs head, but no pedals. I am one of the miss-guided local T guys that tries to gather up any RHD parts that I can find for future projects.

 

The lower steering bracket should be cast iron for RHD. I haven't never seen a brass/bronze one so yours is likely a reproduction.

 

I occasionally will part with a spare, if I have enough of them. 😉

 

PM me and we can check into Canadian RHD a bit more if you are interested.

 

Jeff

Near the East Coast Port.

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12 hours ago, rodneybeauchamp said:


Living in Australia, I have had as everyday drive car a ‘64 Buick Skylark in LHD format. Sure, overtaking and some intersections area bit difficult but everything else is fine. Getting out kerbside is safer too! My current ‘63 Riviera is also LHD. No problem.

 

 My only issue with RHD conversions is how well they have been done as you do hear horror stories of how they scrub tyres and turn more to one side than the other, or the  steering arm hits the sump on full lock LH turns.

 

For what it is worth I would suggest looking at  the chain drive conversion be as the best option as all of the steering geometry remains factory standard. I drove a friends ‘78 Cadillac Coupe de Ville in both LHD and RHD format with this conversion and could not detect a difference. 

 

Sure RHD is a bit easier,, just my two bobs worth

Rodney 😀😀😀😀😀😀😀
 

 

 

Yep, agree. Many very bad conversions made back in the early days. I would only consider an original 'factory' RHD version, obviously are rare on the streets of Oz. My '28 Chrysler and '37 Dodge are original RHD.

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