Jeff Perkins / Mn

One thing I will never understand.......

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My neighbor parks his $3000 mower in the garage and his $98,000 Escalade in the driveway.  I guess technically a bank owns the Escalade 🥴

Edited by 39BuickEight (see edit history)

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1 minute ago, 39BuickEight said:

My neighbor parks his $3000 mower in the garage and his $98,000 Escalade in the driveway.  I guess technically a bank owns the Escalade 🥴

He's probably going to Keep the mower longer than the escalade.  My truck used to sit outside until I built the new shop but I always tried to get the equipment inside.  Though the truck was not real valuable anyways.  Both the tractor and Excavator cost more.  plus last thing you want to do is have to work on the equipment if not necessary before you can do the work you had planned. 

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Local building codes can also be a problem. Around here it is an expensive , time consuming process to jump through all the hoops in order to build a city approved structure. And no easy to construct , inexpensive "pole barn " style buildings allowed. Just garages that are probably nicer / better built than many 50 year old homes in the area.  A cost generally in the $40,000 + range. But cheap plastic tarp shelters are not a problem unless two or more immediate neighbors complain. And likewise you can generally get away with thrown together " sheds " as long as they are small and not built on a foundation.

So cars around here get "temporarily " stored in all sorts of substandard, non - permanent "shelters". 

  Washington State is just 5 miles to the South of me. Not only is land very cheap in comparison to my side of the border, but pole barns are legal, common and less than a quarter the cost of a similar sized "conforming " structure in my area. All my crap sheds would disappear in a blink if I could erect a basic , sound, weathertight, cost effective building.

 

Greg in Canada

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Gal down the street has a 1970 442 Olds convertible, she wants to add a one car garage to the existing ONE car garage, $10,000 + in town fees and architect plans, and she just got the OK. Town BS makes the town money, but isn't right. Bob 

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I have a rule that will have no more cars than garage space with a door. I keep adding doors.

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Here is the second car I restored and sold I think around 1987. The new owner left it outside with the drivers window down until about 3 years ago when he gave it to his son.  The engine was stuck, flat tires, interior is covered in cat hair and ruined from the cat claws. The garage was used to store his junk and scrap metal so the car was left outside all those years. There is also a 1937 Dodge that he bought as a driver and did the same thing to. But it was just pushed out back and now has trees growing around it rotting into the ground. You can tell it has been sitting there all winter by the layers of snow on it. 

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About two miles from me sits a 68 or 69 Plymouth Road Runner that has been under a tarp as long as I have lived here(1983).  At first the tarp was clean and straight and what you could see of the car looked nice.  Now the tarp looks like it has been through a hurricane and the car has settled lower and lower on it’s flat tires.  Chunks of rusty metal hang down to the ground. In front of the house on a concrete driveway.  And on one of the busier city streets. Still proud of it I suppose.

 

Also near me that I saw again just recently are a 65 or 66 Plymouth Barracuda (been outside in a driveway for years) and also a 66 Dodge Charger that looks like it is wrapped in garbage bags.  Different locations. Both look sad and although the  Plymouth looks like it could be saved the Charger is about like the  Road Runner in condition.

Edited by plymouthcranbrook (see edit history)

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That was the only way to find a car before the internet..

 

I picked up a rare part from a guy that put it in the back yard in 1962..  outside..

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Edited by nick8086 (see edit history)

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13 hours ago, 60FlatTop said:

I chuckle at the insanity of those people every time I see a car like that. All my old cars are inside safe and protected. The newer ones that I paid a lot more for are out in the weather right now.

They are some kind of special breed, aren't they.

Bernie

Bernie, we have exact same situation here.  New stuff (mine anyway) outside.  I would argue WE are a special breed also!! 😁

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15 hours ago, auburnseeker said:

He's probably going to Keep the mower longer than the escalade.  My truck used to sit outside until I built the new shop but I always tried to get the equipment inside.  Though the truck was not real valuable anyways.  Both the tractor and Excavator cost more.  plus last thing you want to do is have to work on the equipment if not necessary

You are right, and that leads to an entirely different problem our country has.  Also, this guy doesn’t know a wrench from a set of pliers. He’s not fixing anything on his own anyway.  He is a healthy 25 year old who has a zero turn riding mower for a 20,000 sq ft lot.  He probably uses his mower less than 10 hours a year--seriously.  Hey, who am I to care what he does though?  😆

Edited by 39BuickEight (see edit history)

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My rule is: Whatever it is, if it has to be kept outside in the weather I don't want it. That even goes for the dogs, cats, horses, & chickens............Bob

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I tried for years to buy a '28 Chevy cab and chassis from a nearby farmer. He finally sold it to me,but when I had a wrecker tow it home,the long-flat hard tires nearly shook it apart. I followed along behind picking up pieces. It didn't look too bad when I first saw it.

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The car isn't worth what 40 years of indoor storage would cost. Often times, the person would be money ahead to give it away. In the small town I have lived in now for 4 months, it's a very low crime area, a guy parked a nice Harley dresser out on the side drive next to the street, it has been sitting there for 4 months now. No cover over it, it hasn't moved. Rain, snow etc. Amazingly it still looks like new.

-Ron

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22 hours ago, auburnseeker said:

He's probably going to Keep the mower longer than the escalade.  My truck used to sit outside until I built the new shop but I always tried to get the equipment inside.  Though the truck was not real valuable anyways.  Both the tractor and Excavator cost more.  plus last thing you want to do is have to work on the equipment if not necessary before you can do the work you had planned. 

Some people have to put the equipment inside, ZoningNazi snowflakes  might think their property values are failing. Bob  

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Ahh yes, we'll never fully understand the human psyche.  Is it that unusually human thing called hope?  I HOPE I can get to it, I HOPE I can do it, I HOPE I will have the time....   Or is it the male ego clinging to youth: I AM going to get to it someday.  I AM going to acquire the tools, the facilities, the skills, the cash; whatever.  To sell the hulk after all those years is to abandon the dream, admit aging, ... face mortality!  As long as the car is still in the yard, the dream is still alive.   The deterioration of a ten or twenty-thousand dollar car may be for some a small price to pay for 42 years of hoping and dreaming and feeling young, no matter how frustrating it might seem to the observer.   The stories here have occurred over and over, in every town in the country.  Sometimes I think that the after-purchase neglect could even be some twisted form of buyer's remorse.  The OP is right.  We don't understand it, we will NEVER understand it, and it will never stop.   (Thanks for indulging.  I am in a philosophical mood tonight.  And by the way, all my cars are garaged.)

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Interesting topic.  Back in 1965 I accompanied another AACA member to a farm outside of our home town.  There was an interesting open car sitting in the farmer's grove of trees (called a "woods" there), and obviously the car was going to eventually become part of the earth if it were not rescued.  Old open cars exposed to rain and snow will not last very long.  It is simply a rule of thumb observation that somehow escapes some people.  Well, it's a concept.  My friend had restored several basket cases and was willing to rescue and restore the derelict car.  Negotiations were short; the derelict in the woods and weeds was "the family car"; no way were they going to sell it.  And like at grave side services where we hear, "... dust to dust..." the treasured family car transformed back into iron ore and became one with the earth.  Some treasures are just to valuable to save.

Albert Einstein.jpg

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All of my cars being stored inside is personal choice (and an insurance requirement), They are also all paid for, insured, licensed, and except for the project car, able to leave for the left coast tomorrow.

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I went to look at a 32 Chrysler setting in a guys back yard. It had set there so long everything was rusted beyond repair but the car wasn't for sale. The whole interior was gone out of the car. There was a guy close to me who went to Hershey and bought Senior winners and put them on a car hauler and took them back to his farm where they set outside on the car hauler for 20 years. There are all kinds of collectors. Some people just want the car. To them, owning the car is it.

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On 1/19/2020 at 7:12 PM, auburnseeker said:

My neighbor parks his $3000 mower in the garage and his $98,000 Escalade in the driveway.

  I've always said most Americans have $400 worth of junk in the garage and $40,000 worth of cars out itn the weather.

  It;s one of the American ways I don't understand.

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"bought Senior winners and put them on a car hauler and took them back to his farm where they set outside on the car hauler for 20 years. " - sounds like a waste of a hauler.

 

Am strange, do not buy more cars than have garage doors . Only thing outside is my dolly (and the winch is inside). Running out of places to add doors.

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I really don't think its that hard to understand if you take a broader perspective. Take the guy who collects clocks for example. Are all his clocks restored? running? Also it is very easy to buy something with good intentions but life has many twists and turns and the best laid plans are easily overwhelmed by unplanned events. All of my daily drivers set out in the weather because they have not reached collector status yet. When a new car is purchased it goes down in value rather rapidly and generally the thought is to trade it in on a new one before it becomes an antique so why give it preferred status? Then, as stated before it can be easy to get emotionally attached to a car and not want to part with it regardless of its condition and who are you to say what is right for someone else. Many cars have been saved for the next generation because somebody bought them. Today, we are being told that the value of many antique cars is dropping and interest in the very early ones is waning. Some have predicted that in twenty years there will be no gasoline to burn in antique cars. The question might be turned to say, why are you guys putting so much money and time into something that won't last?

 

The guy that bought the car hauler full of cars had more than one Rolls setting out in the weather. He loved cars and had money to spend. When he ran out of barns, he parked the cars outside.

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On ‎1‎/‎20‎/‎2020 at 2:31 PM, Bhigdog said:

My rule is: Whatever it is, if it has to be kept outside in the weather I don't want it.

I think the worst offender of that was seen at the Lambrecht auction; hundreds of double-digit low mileage cars that sat outside for three generations.

 

My own rule right now is, if I obtain a 'new' vehicle, one of my current cars MUST go, which puts a cap on the amount I can sufficiently keep, which includes proper indoor shelter for ALL of them.

 

More horror stories here about Studebakers needlessly rotting away: https://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/forum/your-studebaker-forum/general-studebaker-specific-discussion/57888-studes-that-made-it-but-were-nonetheless-lost?56482-Studes-that-quot-made-it-quot-but-were-nonetheless-lost=

 

Craig

 

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Do not forget  about all of the cars stored for a short time in the jaws of the crusher. Sitting around outside, is still around. Lots of young car guys/ gals have learned what to do, and not to do on cars that have been left for dead. It is amazing to me, how many cars are still around. Just about every year, make and model of a production car is available on the market. As a finished car, or as a project. Yes the rare stuff is rare. It has always been that way. You can find what you want out there, just have to look. If it was not for the owner of this Hudson deciding to sell, because it just sat outside, and no one wanted to deal with it, or fix it up. I would not have been able to buy it. Thank you collectors/ hoarders.

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Edited by Xander Wildeisen (see edit history)
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