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HeyPop

Protecting the finish

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Except for the painting to the sheetmetal, I've just about got my Huckster ready to go. As much as I swear the truck will never see the rain (on purpose) ... I know I'm gonna get wet one way or another. Anyone out there have a suggestion on what to put on top of the 4 coats of polyurethane I already have on it to protect the finish against the occaisional drip? confused.gif

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HeyPop

I put only three coats of polyurethane on my oak body over 11 years ago and nothing more! Looks almost as good as day one and boy have I gotten wet over the years - by accident of course (darned weathermen). The wood has mellowed over the years and is actually starting to look like a vintage piece of oak furniture. I think if you wax over the poly - you make it more difficult to recoat someday - maybe 15 years down the line. I know I'll be too old to care by then. wink.gif

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HeyPop...I agree with TsandAs.

Urethane is one solid sealer. Commercial Art is a hobby of mine. I have lettered & pin striped practically everything over the years. (Boats, Stock Cars, 4 Fire Trucks, too many signs to even remember, all by hand with brushes. Have Air-Brushed with the same results in that the subject must be stripped clean.)

Firemen, for example: The local fire companies, like all, wax/polish the hell out of their equipment. Try painting/striping over wax. It will bead up just like water. Took me more hours to strip the wax off than it did to do the job on the 4 trucks I lettered/striped.

With today's excellent waxes & polishes, I would vote to allow the urethane to protect the wood from rain drops. If applied correctly, it is tough stuff. On the other hand, you could wax/polish it because to re-do the wood, you would have to strip the urethane off with the wax. Guess it is your call in my opinion.

Regards, Peter J.

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Now when you talk about stripping wax. I have always been led to believe that carnuba wax is okay, but you don't want to use wax that contains silicone. I have been told that silicone wax has a way of actually working its way into the metal and making it extremely difficult for paint to stick to it. I realize that for most of the purposes we're talking about show cars, but even if your waxing a daily driver, if you're car is involved in an accident that requires bodywork, this silicone wax can prove to be aggravating if you have to do a repair.

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With all the messing around and experimenting I've been doing lately with finishes, in regard to removing oily substances and waxes from paint on cars metal, I've found PPG's DX-330 works super. Read about it in the "Repaint Manual for Ford...." Definitely takes it off the hood I've been screwing with. Not real sure what it would do to wood with urethane on. Maybe I'll check it out on a old piece in the shop.Thanks for all the 'input'. smile.gif

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Never use anything on you paint with sillycone. I won't even allow the stuff in my garage because I do some painting. This also includes Armor All. A small amount of that stuf will create really bad fisheye in the finish and is really hard to completly remove. frown.gif

I prefer Maguires products. They have quite a large line of products that seem to always work as described. My car does get wetter than most grin.gif , so a good wax is required. Remember that when water beads up, that is what creates spots, it is best for the water to "sheet" and run off. It is just my humble opinion. Your mileage may vary! grin.gif

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I use spar varnish on wood exposed to the weather. It has more UV inhibitors in it since it's used primarily in marine applications. I think it has a little slower dry time than regular urethane.

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Oh no, I haven't used a wax containing silicone since I heard that (about 10 years ago). Now I use carnuba paste wax. When I was in the mustang club, I knew people who had bought their mustangs new that had never used wax on their cars at all. A lot of the guys I knew at the time used that 3M Imperial Hand Glaze and nothing else. That stuff was excellent on dark colors, it took away that hazey look and usually left the car with a "wet" look but frequently washed away when it rained. From what I was told several years ago by a reputable interior man was that Armor All was the worst thing that you can use. He told me that Armor All dries out your interior and causes cracking (vinyl, plastic and leather). His recommendation at the time was Pledge furniture polish. I've used nothing but Pledge for over 15 years and my interior is still in good shape. I'm not saying that everything else is wrong, but that's what I've used and have had good results.

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I have used the 3M hand glaze and it is real good at covering up the fine lines you get from dust scratches in your mirror shine but it burns off in a few hours in the hot sun so if you show your car at outside shows, you may need to go over it often.

as for Armor all, I have used it on my Mustang seats since about 1983 and the dash and it does make things look much better but now my car has started to show signs of neglect from the sun on the black. It looks like it is burnt and hard on the top of the seats. I don't know if this is from the hot sun being magnafyed by the glass or Armor All or what but it is time to recover the seats again. They did have some ware anyway because I did drive this car a lot but they would have been OK for a few more years if I had not left the car outside for about 3 or 4 years before the last move.I will try the Pledge idea since Armor All makes the seats hard to hold on to in a sharp curve and you should never get any of it on the wheel or you will regret it!

I have painted cars for years and have only had fisheyes on 1 or 2 spots ever. If you use a good solvent to wipe the car down before you sand on it and again before you prime it, you should be OK. I also use a fisheye aditive in the paint just in case cause those little buggers are a pain to fix!

Just my 2 cents

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JT.... YEARS (and I do mean YEARS) ago I used to detail my neighbors old Desoto woody. I removed the old finish on the wood because it was starting to get dark where the spar had started to crack and allow the water into the wood. Are the newer Spars less apt to crack from the sun? I guess thats what the UV inhibitors are for? The local paint vendor that used to supply all my paint while I was taking care of all the buildings for the Fone Co. had given me a gallon of Valspar another client had not picked up because it was too dark. I didn't use it for the same reason but he told me to keep it anyway.

My biggest concern is the cracks I couldn't close up getting invaded by water. As much as I'm a stickler for tight joints, there's always gonna be one I have to rely on the finish to seal. I don't use plastic wood or filler. Not my style.

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