Ovalrace25

1933 Studebaker President Barn Find

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The Russian car is not a President. It has only five gages in the dash cluster, and the engine is a 6 cyl. I could be a model 56 with the six cyl or it could have had an engine swap. The fact is that I know some of the things that it's not, but not 100% sure what it is. 

 

The northern California car is interesting, but it's not a Speedway. It's probably a model 82-the engine looks like the smaller eight cyl. Hard to tell with all the smoke, but it's certainly not the right head for the Speedway. What an idiot twenty five seconds into the engine startup, and revving the hell out of it, he asks about the oil pressure, and of course the gage shows nothing!

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

 

About the Russian video... the car is part of an antique car collection that is displayed at the restaurant in Moscow. The video was posted by the restoration shop that restored the Studebaker and several other cars. The voiceover is mostly about the history of the Studebaker company, not much about the car itself other than pointing out some features. Not sure what the connection is between the restoration shop and the restaurant. I didn't watch the whole video, but that's the gist. Here's a link to pics of some of the other cars restored or being restored by the shop, including several other Studebakers: 

 

https://kmz-zavod.ru/avto/cars/

 

Studebaker vehicles have recognition in Russia, just like Buicks do in China, because everyone fondly remembers the Lend-Lease Studebaker trucks from WWII. Ask any layperson to name an old American car company and they'll probably come up with Ford and Studebaker, in that order. 

Edited by Big Beat (see edit history)

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12 hours ago, Mark Huston said:

A 1933 Studebaker on the streets in the 1957.   It is reported to have survived.  

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Yes that is me I posted that pic. Same car below at Hershey in 2018.

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13 minutes ago, coachJC said:

Yes that is me I posted that pic. Same car below at Hershey in 2018.

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Great looking Studebaker!   I am sure you have a blast with it everytime you take it out.   What model is it?

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19 minutes ago, Mark Huston said:


 

Great looking Studebaker!   I am sure you have a blast with it everytime you take it out.   What model is it?

1933 President 4-Seasons Roadster - I believe 

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That is indeed a great looking Studebaker.

 

One can’t help but marvel at the incredible changes in American car styling in just 2 or 3 years from 1930 style vertical radiator shells to aesthetically designed grills and raked back windshields. Rapid changes in styling development throughout the 1930’s. 

 

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2 hours ago, Mark Huston said:


 

Great looking Studebaker!   I am sure you have a blast with it everytime you take it out.   What model is it?

It is a 92 series President Speedway Roadster. It is 1 of 8 of the 92 series cars to exist and one of 2 of that body style. The other Roadster is in the process of being restored but was missing it original motor.

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Mark,

 

It's one of the two surviving Model 92 speedway cars. 

 

John,

 

The term Four Season Roadster was only used for the 1931 President. I get questioned often, regarding the roadster part of the name, because it is really a convertible or a convertible coupe, with roll-up windows. The reason for the confusion in terms, is that Studebaker used the term as part of their advertising theme. The 31 was Studebaker's first sporty soft-top car to use roll-up windows, and I think that they wanted the buying public to get the message, so they included the descriptive term in the model name. 

Edited by Buffalowed Bill (see edit history)

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It's been a while since I have paid attention to one, but isn't it a roadster with roll up windows (ie top is more roadster-ish than convertible coupe  at how it seals the windows when rolled up) ?

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)

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When the roadster body style/type was starting to loose favor with the buying public ( just like phaetons and touring cars were at the same time) the sales foce that was in place did not want the perspective customers who wanted open body styles to loose interest and drift to another make of vehicle. SO the "transition" word /description was a convertible roadster or convertible phaeton. The two just mentioned had roll up windows in the doors but usually were styled to look very much like a roadster or phaeton that used side curtains, rods and snaps to keep the weather out. If someone is used to a particular name for decades and it is instantly changed some confusion is possible among a good majority of the people  ie "why did they get rid of that car ( body style) I liked it!  ( but they also liked the price because that particular body style was cheaper - cars with roll up windows cost more because they cost more to produce) . Changing times and names: station wagons ( so named because they took you to and from the train station) and suburbans  became mini vans, became SUV's or hatch backs or ????  Nick names for certain features were popular as well - rumble seats were know as 'mother in law ' seats.  But I have to admit in all my years of research I never saw a manufacturer refer to a rumble seat as a mother in law seat...........................................🤐

Edited by Walt G
transposed letters (see edit history)
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Here is what Studebaker called our car in a preshow booklet in 1933.....All-Weather Convertible Roadster....

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another one of those idiots that loves the "barn find"  TV shows.  Hey if we can make it run lets do it and destroy it in the process !  But hey it "runs".

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Here are some pictures I took of one of the remaining 1933 President Speedway Model 92'sThese pictures were taken in 2013.  Beautiful car.  I would have loved the opportunity to drive one of the greatest Studebaker Presidents built.

 

  

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Edited by Mark Huston (see edit history)
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Nothing better than the rare and obscure. Satisfaction more than you can imagine. I recently drove a fantastic world class car for the first time in many, many years. Wonderful sensation beyond description. 

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This was at the Bakersfield swap meet in 2017. Impressive cars

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Just got a text message from the guy that has looked at the Studebaker. Not much help at all! Says the wheelbase is 120" (wrong) and he counted the grill slats at 44 or 45. Says he cant read the numbers on the door plate. And did not confirm a price or take more pictures. Not Easy getting information! 

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Was it ever found out if the mystery 1933 Studebaker somewhere in Northern California was a Speedway President? 4-door, 2-door ? Images? 

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