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Found this Buick Roadster with dual side mounts at an abandoned sawmill town called Tula in Michigan's western UP.

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

Not the same car. The OP car appears to be a '28 model based upon the smooth crown fenders. It also appears to have been some sort of a coupe, an enclosed body style. Looks like  an enclosed base of a windshield. I don't have the proper reference books, or the body code numbers could probably identify for certain the year and body style.

 

The one Jeff P (hey there Jeff!) posted appears to be probably a '26/'27, it appears to have what I would call "double crown" fenders. It also appears to have what is left of an open car windshield. That roadster could maybe still be an interesting car to restore?

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Odd, that Buick appears to have been abandoned after only five years.

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Abandoned after only 5 yrs? Naw, with the population density of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula in the 1930’s it’s doubtful anyone would’ve bothered to register it. Probably only ever driven farm to farm....


Looking back at incidental car photos in the family albums, I’ve seen a lot of 1930’s plates on photos taken right through the 1950’s in the higher populated lower peninsula. IF they had a plate at all.

 

(1926 Chevy converted into a farm truck pictured below. Forget the date - 1940’s. No plate. No lights. Driven into town once per week. Thanks for the excuse to post it🙂)

 

99E0C4C7-E409-43CA-A7D0-8B86D45C6617.jpeg

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Enjoy reading these sorts of finds and anecdotal stories of cars in the past. reminds us all of a different era, when especially in rural areas, life moved along very slowly. Either of the Buicks would be great to see pulled from their hiding spot and displayed in some respectful manner.  

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I grew up in the Upper Michigan back woods and a lot of vehicles had no plates.  When I was around 20 I had a 38 ford stake truck that I never licensed and I'd even take it to town occasionally and park on the main street.  The starter was shot but it started real good with a hand crank.  The good old days of double clutching, mechanical brakes, hand windshield wipers, no directionals and constantly patching tires.  Many logging trucks were never licensed because they just traveled from the woods to the nearest railroad siding or sawmill and never saw the highways at all.  A guy who lived down the road from my folks had a 24 Ford stake truck that he made wood with.  When I got old enough I would go help him and it was a blast bouncing down the woods roads in that thing, although sometimes it got wet or dusty inside because it had no floorboards.  Later on he traded it off for a mid 30's Terraplane joker.  Which finally broke down in the woods behind my old house and it stayed there for several years.  I moved away and I wonder if it's still there.

 

Edited by Section10 (see edit history)
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Job number 7710 is a 1928 model 58 2-door coupe.

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On 1/15/2020 at 4:53 PM, Gunsmoke said:

Reminds us all of a different era, when especially in rural areas, life moved along very slowly. 

 

I agree, Gunsmoke, that these historical anecdotes are interesting.

I read quite a lot from old books and magazines, and have reprinted

some historical articles for our AACA region's newsletter.  I also

know a centenarian or two.

 

I think it's a myth, though, for today's populace to think small towns

are "sleepy" or that life was slow then.  Transportation was slow and

sometimes arduous, but people had just as many cares as today, and

sometimes had to work longer and harder than those of us in today's

convenience-laden society. It wasn't a care-free life with every evening

rocking on the porch, unless a person was 4 years old at the time.

The farmers harvesting with long hours of hard work, even at night;  

workmen with a 6-day work week;  pioneers happy to travel 10 miles

in a long day;  wouldn't tell us that their life was easy or slow!

 

Covered Wagon--Mormon Pioneer Heritage.jpg

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)

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I believe those are Studebaker’s being pulled by the oxen

Have fun

Dave S 

Edited by SC38DLS (see edit history)

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John, I didn't intend to suggest for a moment that rural life back then (and even now) did not involve long hours or hard work, and even in many cases hardships of all sorts. But, the term "rat race" was not an accidental term, it was used by many to describe the hectic, frenetic and some might say crazy pace of urban and big city life, both back then, and today, a race involving commuting to work, trying to quickly climb the ladder of success, and a constant desire to outdo or out-earn the next guy. The same "slow pace" in rural areas applied to growth, where population and development in most small towns would be virtually unchanged for generations, and even the same families lived there for generations. It was indeed a lifestyle many still fondly remember and miss in spite of some shortcomings. 

 

Great picture of the "Wagon Train", slow moving all right, anyone recognize the valley, anyone on here who can photoshop it from being tilted 15 degrees?

Edited by Gunsmoke (see edit history)

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I suppose you could call me a senior citizen by now.  Yet I'm not too ancient.  It happened that I grew up in an environment that was largely obsolete even when I was in it.  My parents had me late in life and my world was very rural and quiet and almost locked into an earlier generation.  Old cars, old boats, old darned near everything.  Now new stuff I don't relate to even though I can somewhat run a computer.  I am more modern now but even though that old life was harder, it really was better in a subtle way.  Very hard to elucidate but still real and I'm old enough to compare the differences.  Much of modern is very good but it all comes with a price.  Sometimes that price is uncomfortably high.  My wife cooked on a wood range from the time she married me.  A year and a half ago we gave it up and I still don't think she's forgiven me for it.  Old ways get into your blood or it is in your blood from the beginning.  Either way, leaving it behind is somewhat painful and I think a person is somewhat poorer after it's gone.  There is a lot I know and can do that very few people are aware of or even care much of anymore.  The world really has changed. 

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Gunsmoke, I believe the above image of the “Wagon Train” is the Mormons descending down Echo Canyon into Salt Lake City. 

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Thanks AzBob, and in return, here is the photo "straightened".  Causes some changes in format, and a bit of detail loss at edges. It was about 10 degrees off. 

 

1covered Wagons Mormons, Echo Canyon. (7).jpg

Edited by Gunsmoke
added more detail (see edit history)
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I’m telling you the Mormons are driving Studebaker’s not Buick’s. 
Dave S 

Edited by SC38DLS (see edit history)

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