AZMustang_1977

Classic Car Club of America approved vehicle list - complete

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Hello there,  I am new to this forum and wondered if the CCCA approved list includes FORD's from the 80's? If so, where can I find this list and/or find out if 1989 Mustangs fall in the "classic" category as of yet.

 

Any guidance would be helpful.

 

Thanks!

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Go to  classiccarclub.org/grand_classics/approved_classics_2019.html     .

 

Definitely no Fords. Only prewar  and a few '40's postwar Lincolns. Mass produced assembly line cars just don't fit the definition of a "classic" car. The term has to be one of the most misused words in the car hobby.

 

The Classic Car Club website defines what attributes are required for classic car status.

 

Jim

Edited by J.H.Boland (see edit history)
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there are a few other immediate post-war cars CCCA eligible, but a different club (aaca?) is a fit for 1980's Fords

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Classic Car Club of America is for certain select model automobiles built between 1915 and 1948.  Very exclusive in its list of cars.  

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The CCCA lists cars that they consider "Classic,"

which is the same term as "Full Classic."

As noted, they were expensive cars of limited 

production, mostly before World War II.

 

However, they don't own the word!  The word

"classic," with a lower-case letter, is widely used by

everyone else to describe old cars that people enjoy.

There is no list for that--it's what you make it to be!

 

As Steve Moskowitz intimated above, the AACA is the

club for collectible cars of all sorts.  Vehicles 25 years

old, or older, are eligible to participate in their events.

If you join the national organization, you can also join

a "region" near you that will enable you to know other

local car fans, and participate in many fun local activities.

Being active in AACA can really enhance your enjoyment

of your old car.

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On 1/13/2020 at 2:46 PM, J.H.Boland said:

Go to  classiccarclub.org/grand_classics/approved_classics_2019.html     .

 

Definitely no Fords. 

Yes, there one Ford in CCCA and possible have been one or two more  - super rare "Custom" bodies. And, there are Brewster Fords.  However, there are no Cunningham Fords.  

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8 minutes ago, John_Mereness said:

Yes, there one Ford in CCCA and possible have been one or two more  - super rare "Custom" bodies. And, there are Brewster Fords.  However, there are no Cunningham Fords.  

 

I stand corrected.

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There is a one off Ford roadster with a european body in restoration, and it will premier at Pebble in the next year or two.........it's a CCCA Classic. Cars is about a 34-36 year, I can't remember. Owned by one of the top collectors in the country.

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AZ, The C.C.C.A is a club that specializes in 1915-1948 vehicles if fine and unusual distinction. The cars that qualify for the club can be found on their website. As Steve points out your vehicle would be welcome in the A.A.C.A. As to when your vehicle would be accepted into the "Classic" category, not to hurt your feelings, I would say never.

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Snob cars

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No different than any other specialty club.  I was a CCCA member but never thought of pressing for inclusion of cars like our mass produced mid-range Jr. Packard anymore than I would think of bringing our SL to a traditional hot rod meet. 

 

OP I think was looking to get motors running here... I never get why CCCA gets bashed but other niches don't, could it be reverse snobbery? 🤔

 

 

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For sake of car collecting, it better be "all for one and one for all" - this may look like a big industry, but the ties that bind are pretty weak and it allows eating on the apple to the core (and then you throw the core away). 

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29 minutes ago, padgett said:

Snob cars


 

Yup........I like the snobby, elitist junk from the pre war era.........glad no one else likes them!

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I never had any problems working on them, or admiring them on the lawn at Pebble Beach. You buy your ticket and walk in, no net worth questions or car ownership required. Bob 

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24 minutes ago, 1937hd45 said:

I never had any problems working on them, or admiring them on the lawn at Pebble Beach. You buy your ticket and walk in, no net worth questions or car ownership required. Bob 

I admire good restoration work (as well as dedication/care) and interesting cars. 

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I was a CCCA member for many years and like any club met both snobs and highly inclusive people along the way. Other than the AACA (thank you West Petersen), their publications were and are, first rate. I think there's plenty of room for all interests in this hobby, even if you do like snobby cars!

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Funny thing: "snob" means commoner.

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There have always been many wonderful people in many different facets of vintage vehicle clubs for as long as I can remember. 

 

I grew up in an enthusiastic family of vintage car lovers. Born in 1953, I drove my first gas-powered "car" in antique car parade in 1957. Rode to my wedding reception in a little parade in a Kissel touring (now owned by Ron Hausman) in 1974, and received a 40 Ford coupe as our wedding present. So I've been at it for a while. 

 

Anyway, my parents had one old car at a time, for most our lives...mostly Hupmobiles, Fords, or etc. Over the years we belonged to the AACA (Southern Ohio Chapter), the Veteran Car Club (the folks with BULB HORN magazine), The Classic Car Club of America, the Hupmobile club, and the "Ding-a-lings" (regional antique fire truck club), and probably some others. Yet we never owned a genuine "Classic" car. We never owned a really early brass era car, and we never owned a fire truck either. But we belonged to all those clubs because of the many wonderful people who were members there. And we were welcomed warmly. Ours was a very modest single-income family during my childhood, but no one seemed to care...

 

In my many years of involvement in vintage vehicle clubs and informal groups, etc, I have met many, many wonderful and kind people. I also met a few "snobs," or other people whose company I didn't enjoy much. But even as a very small child, I remember the kindness of the vast majority of them. And I can say with some confidence that I did not encounter any greater percentage of unpleasant people in Classic car circles, or among people who owned expensive vintage cars. Wealth does not equal snobbishness, and the CCCA's interest in maintaining the special status and recognition of "Full Classic" cars does not equal a downturned nose aimed at all other makes, models, and years of old vehicles. 

 

Just my take on it. 

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Lump you stated that very very well. Especially the first two sentences of your last paragraph.

 

The assorted clubs have their focus and criteria, some are more into judging, some social activities, some tours etc. All have merit and are there for those of us who collect "used cars". which is what all of the stuff we own is! There are lots of clubs to belong to , all want you to be a member of their particular group and send in your annual dues for their organization. Some great clubs like any other organization can go from great to not so great in your opinion . I joined my first old car club in 1964. I currently belong to the Buick Club of America and their local region, as well as AACA . I am very happy with both clubs, great focus, etc. For nearly 50  years was involved in CCCA, but am no longer. Times change and people change , you have to go with a club or people that you are comfortable with, life is very very short, we have the cars we do because they make us feel good - they relieve the every day stress that we have to cope with. Go with the flow that makes you feel good because you are welcomed with open arms of friendship.

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55 minutes ago, lump said:

There have always been many wonderful people in many different facets of vintage vehicle clubs for as long as I can remember. 

 

I grew up in an enthusiastic family of vintage car lovers. Born in 1953, I drove my first gas-powered "car" in antique car parade in 1957. Rode to my wedding reception in a little parade in a Kissel touring (now owned by Ron Hausman) in 1974, and received a 40 Ford coupe as our wedding present. So I've been at it for a while. 

 

Anyway, my parents had one old car at a time, for most our lives...mostly Hupmobiles, Fords, or etc. Over the years we belonged to the AACA (Southern Ohio Chapter), the Veteran Car Club (the folks with BULB HORN magazine), The Classic Car Club of America, the Hupmobile club, and the "Ding-a-lings" (regional antique fire truck club), and probably some others. Yet we never owned a genuine "Classic" car. We never owned a really early brass era car, and we never owned a fire truck either. But we belonged to all those clubs because of the many wonderful people who were members there. And we were welcomed warmly. Ours was a very modest single-income family during my childhood, but no one seemed to care...

 

In my many years of involvement in vintage vehicle clubs and informal groups, etc, I have met many, many wonderful and kind people. I also met a few "snobs," or other people whose company I didn't enjoy much. But even as a very small child, I remember the kindness of the vast majority of them. And I can say with some confidence that I did not encounter any greater percentage of unpleasant people in Classic car circles, or among people who owned expensive vintage cars. Wealth does not equal snobbishness, and the CCCA's interest in maintaining the special status and recognition of "Full Classic" cars does not equal a downturned nose aimed at all other makes, models, and years of old vehicles. 

 

Just my take on it. 

We still have a great group in the Southern Ohio Chapter AACA and it is growing and have tour/event hosts for about every month this year. Even new officers and Gauge editor. Hopefully you can make it to some events/tours this year. I will be pestering you and West this year. 

 

Tom Muth

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Wow, some of you guy's are tough. There are clubs for just about any type of collector vehicle. Clubs for Model T's, Model A's, Tri-Five Chevy's, T-Birds Etc. The C.C.C.A happens to have true Classic cars. You wouldn't join a Packard club with an Nash. The term "Classic Car" is thrown around too much. People see a 1950 Hudson and call it a classic car, it's simply not. The A.A.C.A welcomes them all. I think Lump sums it up perfectly!

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People who get angry that the CCCA is "exclusive" don't seem to get angry that they don't let Mustangs into Corvette shows. Why?

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"Oh you know those people with exclusive cars." I always thought the root word of exclusive was "exclude". No shortage of that in geezerland. Did you give the arms crossed "Hrumph" today?

 

One short step from the balcony seat to the row of six folding chairs at any car show entrance.

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When I had my first Camaro in 1967 it had a Mustang grille emblem - the Mustang club had the best autocrosses.

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