36Special

After 3 Years!!!

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14 hours ago, 60FlatTop said:

The car looks like a lot of attention to detail was done in the modifications. And there appear to be a lot.

 

Maybe it would be a good idea to look at the money you have in hand for the restoration and figure how much of that you could use to go through the car as is and make a clean, presentable driver of it. You might be able to sell the car for some profit to put with your restoration money and get a Buick that wouldn't need as much reversal of the modifications.

 

If you haven't owned or restored many old cars in the past you may find that is a pretty nice car to own and drive after servicing and shining. Maybe not as chivalrous as restoring, but a lot more satisfying in the long run.

 

Looks like a lot to work with.

Bernie

Bernie, 

 

Thanks for the advice but selling it is not an option. I intend to keep in the family. Part of the fun for me is going to be the restoration part. It's not about the money, because I don't plan on being the richest man in the cemetery when my time comes. My family is already taken care of when I go. I plan to pass the car down to my step son because it did belong to his grandfather.

 

I've restored a 1970 Buick Gran Sport with my father when in my late teens. Only difference with that one is that it was all there except the stock hood with the air induction openings a grilles. In fact, there was no hood. It needed a lot of TLC but it ran when I put a new battery in it so I drove it off the back of the used car lot two blocks to my home. I worked for a Buick dealer back then and it was easy to still get some stuff without having to track down aftermarket and swap meet parts.

 

I'm determined to keep it. I will start breaking it down once I get it to my garage and start tearing it down.

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6 hours ago, KongaMan said:

If you want a stock 36 Buick, this may not be the best place to start.  If that's your unshakeable goal, your best bet might be to wash it, vacuum it, get it running, and sell it for seed money to put yourself on a cheaper, faster, less challenging, and more rewarding path.

 

OTOH, wash it, vacuum it, get it running, and drive the crap out of it might provide entertainment for the summer.  Then sell it. ;) 

KM, 

 

Yeah, selling it isn't an option. Like I stated previously, I am going to pass it down to my step son regardless of whatever I decide to do with the restoration because it was his grandfather's vehicle.

 

I am up to the challenge of putting this baby back on the road.

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11 minutes ago, 36Special said:

I'm determined to keep it. I will start breaking it down once I get it to my garage and start tearing it down.

 

Take LOTS OF PICTURES!!  They will come in handy during reassembly.

 

Also this is a great place to get help.

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Its the middle of winter.

 

Start your parts search NOW, for the correct 1936 components besides the drivetrain, including instrument cluster, steering column, etc.

 

That way, you'll have it 'in stock' in your basement when you're ready for that stage of the restoration.

 

Craig

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1 minute ago, 8E45E said:

Its the middle of winter.

 

Start your parts search NOW, for the correct 1936 components besides the drivetrain, including instrument cluster, steering column, etc.

 

That way, you'll have it 'in stock' in your basement when you're ready for that stage of the restoration.

 

Craig

Craig, 

 

That was exactly my goal. Although middle of winter here in NC is pretty mild, lol. I have been researching parts options and availability since the weekend, lol.

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My advice is to find a reasonably complete 1936 Special parts car with the correct chassis, engine, suspension, steering  etc that perhaps is to far gone body wise with rust. Remove the rusty body and restore the complete chassis, engine etc. THEN use the car you now have to start to transfer/donate  its body, fenders etc onto a restored running chassis . Yes, a lot of work , but it will save you a lot of effort trying to find parts ( since you do not have a stock car to look at to see what parts you need /fit etc)

Walt

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4 minutes ago, Walt G said:

My advice is to find a reasonably complete 1936 Special parts car with the correct chassis, engine, suspension, steering  etc that perhaps is to far gone body wise with rust. Remove the rusty body and restore the complete chassis, engine etc. THEN use the car you now have to start to transfer/donate  its body, fenders etc onto a restored running chassis . Yes, a lot of work , but it will save you a lot of effort trying to find parts ( since you do not have a stock car to look at to see what parts you need /fit etc)

Walt

Walt, 

 

Does make some sense. 

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Makes a lot of sense.   You'll be money and time ahead.  Buying everything you need part by part will prove to be very expensive and consume a lot of time just looking.  I think that all you'll be able to use from the car you have will be the body and seats.  To make the car the way it now sits, the builder had to of hacked into everything else.  

 

There is a 36 - 38 Buick Club.  I'm. Getting it will be a great source of parts and information.  www.3638buickclub.org

 

The CTC Auto Ranch in Denton Texas has a couple of 38 Specials that appear to be fairly complete.  They sell whole cars as well as parts.

Edited by RivNut (see edit history)
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1 minute ago, RivNut said:

Makes a lot of sense.   You'll be money and time ahead.  Buying everything you need part by part will prove to be very expensive and consume a lot of time just looking.  I think that all you'll be able to use from the car you have will be the body and seats.  To make the car the way it now sits, the builder had to of hacked into everything else.  

 

There is a 36 - 38 Buick Club.  I'm. Getting it will be a great source of parts and information.  www.3638buickclub.org

Ed, 

 

I get it. Will toy with the idea. Will need to find something someone isn't looking for an arm and leg for that needs restoration for that. Not looking to over pay for it or I could just drop the money for one that's restored already if that was the case. Not looking to do that. I will be doing something with this car, that I know.

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I edited my previous post.  I referred to the CTC Auto Ranch in Denton, TX.  Check them out.

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Scott, I am with the folks that say JUST GET IT RUNNING and drive it for awhile.  It should be enjoyable as is.  Have some fUN. Plenty of time to make it original.  If, indeed, you must.   In the end, "do what ya wanna do."  

 

  Ben

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14 hours ago, KongaMan said:

I saw that yesterday morning. If I had $17, 000 to drop down right now and money to have it shipped here or the time to go get it, that would be an option. Restoring it I think is a better option because I can take my time with it. But duly noted. Thank you.

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19 hours ago, Walt G said:

My advice is to find a reasonably complete 1936 Special parts car with the correct chassis, engine, suspension, steering  etc that perhaps is to far gone body wise with rust. Remove the rusty body and restore the complete chassis, engine etc. THEN use the car you now have to start to transfer/donate  its body, fenders etc onto a restored running chassis . Yes, a lot of work , but it will save you a lot of effort trying to find parts ( since you do not have a stock car to look at to see what parts you need /fit etc)

Walt

It does make perfect sense!

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Just now, 36Special said:

Wow! That is GORGEOUS!!!

 

I have never seen it in person.  And I do not know the owner either.  Plus it says to CALL ONLY for details and I don't see a phone number to call.  But it does show nicely in these pictures.  I am pretty certain the interior may have the correct seat pattern , but the wrong material.   I am sure someone in our chapter may be able to look it over if it is worth exploring. 

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Couldn’t restore one for that price, it’s too bad that that many of the pre war cars don’t have a bigger following,very attractive styling.

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4 minutes ago, gdmn852 said:

Couldn’t restore one for that price, it’s too bad that that many of the pre war cars don’t have a bigger following,very attractive styling.

Couldn't agree more on both accounts.

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I love your determination.  The best advice so far is the parts car.  It’s ok to spend twice what you pay for a parts car, just to get it to you lol.  I recently completed a frame off restoration on a similar car that’s not worth much, but it’s about the journey for people like me (us?), not the value.  I made great use of a parts car.  In fact I sold so many extra parts, that the parts car ended up making me money.  That said, using proper money and time management, connections in the body shop world, and strategy, it can work.  I have under $15,000 in my car, and hours and hours of precious memories working on it with my father, along with learning the ins and out of proper car restoration.

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3 minutes ago, 39BuickEight said:

I love your determination.  The best advice so far is the parts car.  It’s ok to spend twice what you pay for a parts car, just to get it to you lol.  I recently completed a frame off restoration on a similar car that’s not worth much, but it’s about the journey for people like me (us?), not the value.  I made great use of a parts car.  In fact I sold so many extra parts, that the parts car ended up making me money.  That said, using proper money and time management, connections in the body shop world, and strategy, it can work.  I have under $15,000 in my car, and hours and hours of precious memories working on it with my father, along with learning the ins and out of proper car restoration.

Billy, 

 

Appreciate the kind words. I agree on the parts car and the fact that for me\us, it's about the journey and not the value. I have unfinished business because when I had my 1970 Gran Sport, I never got to finish that one. The car is not leaving the family during my lifetime as I am committed to getting it going and restored then when the time comes, passing it down to my step son. I am not interested in selling it. Many people won't agree with this, and to them I say, thank you for the advice, but it's what I want to do. Could I buy one that needs no restoration, sure. I could figure out how to make that happen but it's not as satisfying as when you recreate something yourself. 

 

JMHO

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8 hours ago, JohnD1956 said:

 

I have never seen it in person.  And I do not know the owner either.  Plus it says to CALL ONLY for details and I don't see a phone number to call.  But it does show nicely in these pictures.  I am pretty certain the interior may have the correct seat pattern , but the wrong material.   I am sure someone in our chapter may be able to look it over if it is worth exploring. 

918/258-9789

 

It's in the reply box in the upper left corner of the ad.

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Hello, besides my 49 Buick I also have a 71 MGB that I enjoy driving I have put more in it than it’s worth but that seems to be a common thing among MGB and Triumphs owners,we enjoy driving them,and how much they are worth is incidental. I have been interested in antique cars since the late 60,s it seemed back then people enjoyed driving their cars to shows and touring more so than the money value.

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11 hours ago, gdmn852 said:

Hello, besides my 49 Buick I also have a 71 MGB that I enjoy driving I have put more in it than it’s worth but that seems to be a common thing among MGB and Triumphs owners,we enjoy driving them,and how much they are worth is incidental. I have been interested in antique cars since the late 60,s it seemed back then people enjoyed driving their cars to shows and touring more so than the money value.

Most of the time from what I've heard, you don't ever get the money back you put in, and that's the least of my worries as I don't plan on selling it. I've got some time yet to really decide what I want to do with it, but still leaning towards the restoration.

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Just a generalization: "There are about 300 $100 jobs to do on an easy restoration". I never get time to make the list. That's easy, including time & materials.

 

As an example, I think it would be quite easy to find the remaining 150 or $15,000 worth on the '36 for sale in PA.

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