Jump to content

Recommended Posts

56 minutes ago, jan arnett (2) said:

I used a Mitt once and it worked well.

The city workers used mitts to paint all the light poles every few years. Very fast and worked well with 100% coverage.

 

Craig

Link to post
Share on other sites

This car was brush painted when new. The car is a one off custom Packard 336 Sport Touring by Rollston. It is all original. When you look at the surface in the right light you can see the marks left by the camel hair brush. In 1927 the custom shops had not yet switched over to the new fangled spray gun. Old world craftsmen who had developed their skills on horse drawn carriages weren't about to change a winning formula!

20190801_124310.jpg

  • Like 5
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I used Epifanes on this 26 foot Dodge Watercar I put a new transom on in my driveway.  I painted the entire bottom over on the trailer with a creeper.  With a little thinning it flowed amazingly well, but I had to give it a couple of coats to get the best coverage.  I was amazed how smooth it came out.  There were few if any brush strokes and I wasn't even using a really expensive brush.  It laid much better than the varnish which I wet sanded and buffed when done.  I never touched the bottom.  The transom came off in one piece  so I could use it for a hanger in my garage,  but it was and is today individually planked.   When I made the sign for my business I used the same Epifanes paint and transom for a pattern.   It lasted very well with just some fading that could have easily been buffed back after 5 years of full time southern facing sun exposure.  I saved it and will hang it in the new shop when I get it more finished.  

IMG_4831.JPG

IMG_4832.JPG

IMG_4833.JPG

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

That was the transom I took off, that's why all the bungs are pulled as I was going to pull it plank by plank,  but it came out easier due to some rot in the framing as a unit so I was able to leave it intact. If you look close you can see the bottom corner was rotten and came apart when I was taking it out. Fortunately the planks on the bottom weren't. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is a photo of our 1920 Model K-46 Buick Coupe.  The body on this car was painted with a brush when it was built.  I have been told that the finish was colored varnish.  I am not sure how many coats were applied, but sanding occurred between the applied coatings.  Buick did not go to lacquer type finishes until the 1925 models.  Someone will correct me if I have the year incorrect.  Everything on this car that could go through a drying oven was baked enamel.  After 101 years the body finish is definitely needing attention.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas 

1920 Model K-46 012.jpg

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Michael-Restomod said:

In my rented commercial property I can only use rattle can paint, I doubt anyone can tell the difference. I have gotten very good at it.

 

zCAM05642e.jpg

Trickiest thing I have found with spray cans is keeping the wet line. I painted the glass doors on my shop but by the time you made it all the way around it had tacked just enough to not get a good overlap.  I figured out by the 3rd door,  that if I started and stopped at the handle area,  you couldn't really see it as your site line was obstructed by the handle so you didn't pick it up.   Nice thing is when you are done you can wet sand it all and buff it.  I've done that many times with smaller parts and you can achieve a mirror finish pretty easily. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, auburnseeker said:

Trickiest thing I have found with spray cans is keeping the wet line. I painted the glass doors on my shop but by the time you made it all the way around it had tacked just enough to not get a good overlap.  I figured out by the 3rd door,  that if I started and stopped at the handle area,  you couldn't really see it as your site line was obstructed by the handle so you didn't pick it up.   Nice thing is when you are done you can wet sand it all and buff it.  I've done that many times with smaller parts and you can achieve a mirror finish pretty easily. 

Interesting. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...