John St John

Brush painting cars

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 Back when Dulux was the paint to refinish cars , DuPont offered a "Brushing Solvent" to be used with it.

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ROLLER ! TEXTURED ROLLER AND LATEX HOUSEHOLD PAINT !!

 

Back in the late 1970s while visiting the local K-Mart, the mechanics were pointing out the "ECONOMY" paint job on a mid-1960s Pontiac Catalina which was in their shop getting a new muffler. The beige Latex house paint had been applied with a 12" roller - a TWELVE INCH TEXTURED ROLLER, such as one might have used back then to apply a textured finish to a dining room wall. The paint covered the body panels, trim, bumpers, rust repair(s), everything except for most of the glass. 

 

Do-It-Yourselfers really can save some $$$$$, and can take personal pride in the end result.

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18 hours ago, JV Puleo said:

I have no place where I could spray

The poisons in automotive paints along with the environmental restrictions in many places make brush and roller painting a necessity. 

I have asthma and cannot use automotive paints that effect my breathing. 

I also do all my painting with all the garage doors open while I wearing a chemical mask.

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The first car I painted by myself after my late Brother-in-Law had moveD out of state was our 1983 Chevrolet Cavalier station wagon.  I did not have a compressor then and used a vacuum cleaner based system that I rented from the local rental company.  Did not turn out too bad but since I was a bit inexperienced in these things I got the adjustment for the amount of paint in the mix a little off. Painted it Volkswagen Signal Orange.  There was enough orange peel on it that we began calling the car “The Kelvinator” 

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There is a European paint company in the US. It is called "Fine Paints of Europe" and I believe they are in New Hampshire. I became aware of the paint while restoring an Episcopal Church. The paint smells like automotive paint. It lays down well and shines like a new penny. I am in the process now of brush painting a car I am attempting to restore authentically and am using PPG paint. The problem I'm having is the thinners are so volatile subsequent coats of paint liquefy prior coats. It never occurred to me to use Fine Paints of Europe but I wish now I had.

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Here is a roller/brush painted truck that I built and painted last year... I used Rustolium enamel.... which is self leveling...... and the second and third coats need to go on when wet.. about 5 minutes after the previous coat.... it was done out side in the sun.....

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I have never seen a brush painted vehicle where you could not tell it was brush (or roller) painted. Brush painting is appropriate in some circumstances but don't expect it to compete cosmetically with sprayed paint. Also, having painted a 26 ft boat I do not believe there is any difference between good quality automotive paint and marine paint. Different marketing, yes. 

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2 hours ago, AHa said:

The problem I'm having is the thinners are so volatile subsequent coats of paint liquefy prior coats. It never occurred to me to use Fine Paints of Europe but I wish now I had.

 

Although I've not used it myself, people for years have been recommending the use of the brushable Rustoleum.  That paint apparently doesn't have the problem with thinners that you have encountered with the PPG paint.  Another route is to use a two part paint as I have done in the past, but in the future, I'll probably go with the brushable Rustoleum.  I'm not familiar with "Fine Paints of Europe", but I think those of us on this thread would appreciate your sharing with us any information that you may find on those paint products.

 

Cheers,

Grog

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Just google Fine Paints of Europe and I was wrong, they are based in Vermont but they have satellite offices. I can buy it from a store in Charlotte NC. It is a very high grade of house paint. I was a Benjamin Moore guy before I used Fine Paints of Europe. They import from Wijzonol Bouwverven B.V.  of the Netherlands. I use rustoleum for all kinds of projects on a regular basis. The EPA has made it nearly impossible to make oil based paints in the US and Rustoleum is one of the few brands left.  Fine Paints of Europe is a step above rustoleum.

 

My opinion is, those who endeavor to brush or roller paint are not trying to achieve the same look as a sprayed finish. I am attempting it because the car I am  restoring would have been brush painted originally. I am looking for an original finish. Now I know some do it because of cost and are attempting to compare brush with sprayed but I think the sentiment is: "I can be happy with spending less money and getting less than perfect results."

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1 hour ago, Restorer32 said:

I have never seen a brush painted vehicle where you could not tell it was brush (or roller) painted. Brush painting is appropriate in some circumstances but don't expect it to compete cosmetically with sprayed paint. Also, having painted a 26 ft boat I do not believe there is any difference between good quality automotive paint and marine paint. Different marketing, yes. 

 

Getting rid of roller nap and fine brush marks is no different than getting rid of spray job orange peel. Color sanding with high speed buff will make it as smooth and shiny as a base coat clear coat job and when its well done, the only real difference between brush and spray is the thickness of the paint.

Marine vs Automotive paint. My youngest brother paints boats for Lund and he told me I could use regular automotive paint to squirt my metal flake color above the water, but free boards on down really should be done with marine paint. There is a difference and any paint will work topside. but auto paint  is made to repel water, not to cut through it and it won't hold up to serious use. As my boat spends most of its time sitting on the trailer, a brush full of Rustoleum would probably look good for years.

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I just remembered another paint from my boating days: Petit EZ Poxy, or by another spelling: Easy Poxy.  This is a single part polyurethane that, as I recall, is easy to apply by brush or roller and covers very well.  I painted the topsides (water line to gunwale) of the hull of one of my boats, and the finish lasted with a shine 7-8 years in a very harsh salt water marine environment.  I haven't priced it relative to the brushable Rustoleum, but I would consider it to be an alternative.  As I said in a previous post, I'll probably give the brushable Rustoleum a try when my next painting project comes due.

 

Cheers,

Grog

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4 hours ago, Restorer32 said:

I have never seen a brush painted vehicle where you could not tell it was brush (or roller) painted. Brush painting is appropriate in some circumstances but don't expect it to compete cosmetically with sprayed paint. Also, having painted a 26 ft boat I do not believe there is any difference between good quality automotive paint and marine paint. Different marketing, yes. 

 When I worked in a automotive paint store back in 1959, Dulux paint was sold as marine paint. only the label that was used said marine paint.

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Sometimes owners want cars restored properly, the Rene Thomas Ballot was brush painted the day before the 1919 INDY 500. It looked great on the lawn at Pebble Beach 2019. Bob 

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56 minutes ago, jan arnett (2) said:

I used a Mitt once and it worked well.

The city workers used mitts to paint all the light poles every few years. Very fast and worked well with 100% coverage.

 

Craig

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This car was brush painted when new. The car is a one off custom Packard 336 Sport Touring by Rollston. It is all original. When you look at the surface in the right light you can see the marks left by the camel hair brush. In 1927 the custom shops had not yet switched over to the new fangled spray gun. Old world craftsmen who had developed their skills on horse drawn carriages weren't about to change a winning formula!

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I used Epifanes on this 26 foot Dodge Watercar I put a new transom on in my driveway.  I painted the entire bottom over on the trailer with a creeper.  With a little thinning it flowed amazingly well, but I had to give it a couple of coats to get the best coverage.  I was amazed how smooth it came out.  There were few if any brush strokes and I wasn't even using a really expensive brush.  It laid much better than the varnish which I wet sanded and buffed when done.  I never touched the bottom.  The transom came off in one piece  so I could use it for a hanger in my garage,  but it was and is today individually planked.   When I made the sign for my business I used the same Epifanes paint and transom for a pattern.   It lasted very well with just some fading that could have easily been buffed back after 5 years of full time southern facing sun exposure.  I saved it and will hang it in the new shop when I get it more finished.  

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Not being a boat guy I have to ask why that extra back piece is there? Bob 

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That was the transom I took off, that's why all the bungs are pulled as I was going to pull it plank by plank,  but it came out easier due to some rot in the framing as a unit so I was able to leave it intact. If you look close you can see the bottom corner was rotten and came apart when I was taking it out. Fortunately the planks on the bottom weren't. 

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Here is a photo of our 1920 Model K-46 Buick Coupe.  The body on this car was painted with a brush when it was built.  I have been told that the finish was colored varnish.  I am not sure how many coats were applied, but sanding occurred between the applied coatings.  Buick did not go to lacquer type finishes until the 1925 models.  Someone will correct me if I have the year incorrect.  Everything on this car that could go through a drying oven was baked enamel.  After 101 years the body finish is definitely needing attention.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas 

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11 hours ago, Michael-Restomod said:

In my rented commercial property I can only use rattle can paint, I doubt anyone can tell the difference. I have gotten very good at it.

 

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Trickiest thing I have found with spray cans is keeping the wet line. I painted the glass doors on my shop but by the time you made it all the way around it had tacked just enough to not get a good overlap.  I figured out by the 3rd door,  that if I started and stopped at the handle area,  you couldn't really see it as your site line was obstructed by the handle so you didn't pick it up.   Nice thing is when you are done you can wet sand it all and buff it.  I've done that many times with smaller parts and you can achieve a mirror finish pretty easily. 

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