Ed Luddy

1919 MacLaughlin Buick $2500 CDN

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9 hours ago, Anthony theriault said:if somebody know good knowleadgeable guys about McLaughlin I’m interested to have is information.

I forgot - sure do. There’s a newsletter group and registry set up for your car. See pictures below.

Dean Tryon edits it, and his email address is on the last line below.

Most of the members are active on the Buick pre-war technical section of this AACA forum as well. You are in the right place.

Good luck!

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Well, somehow I edited that up wrong. The question was: Does anyone know knowledgeable McLauglin guys?

The answer is above.

(Done polluting this thread - good luck)

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Hi

 

Great by, interesting car. As everyone has already said. Put the car on jacks, open then engine and transmission for inspection and go through the suspension and brakes.

 

Sorted out they are quite the car to run and drive.

 

The first thing you should is contact the McLaughin Buick Club of Canada and join it. It covers all years of McLaughlin's and will be able to provide help and contacts for more information on how to service the car. Their website can be found by Google, I'll try including it below.

 

http://www.mclaughlin-buickclub.ca/

 

Drive Safe

Jeff

Nova Scotia

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Anthony

 

What a great car!

We have a McLaughlin 25-25 that needs a lot more work than that one!

What other McLaughlins do you have?

 

Brad

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Wouu..!  Excellent find. Congrats and this will be an awesome winter project there..!

I remember my winters in Toronto fixing always something..!

Cheers ..

Apolo

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On 1/11/2020 at 4:59 PM, nsbrassnut said:

The first thing you should is contact the McLaughin Buick Club of Canada

I believe they have now folded and the last I heard they donated their library to AACA. Correct me if I an wrong please.

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9 hours ago, Joe in Canada said:

I believe they have now folded and the last I heard they donated their library to AACA. Correct me if I an wrong please.

They have donated their library to the AACA but have not yet folded. That will happen in the fall of 2021. It's unfortunate,but the same club executive has been in place for years,with nobody else willing to take over. 

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On ‎1‎/‎11‎/‎2020 at 4:56 AM, Anthony theriault said:

Hi everybody, I’m actually on my way back to home with the car and the spare engine/transmission in my trailer. It’s a 7 passenger and he’s so original. Nothing missing except 1 gauge. 
 

me and my wife don’t want to restore the car. We will clean it, make the mechanics work to tour with the car, new top, new tire and he will be ready for he’s new life. He’s sitting in a garage since the 60’s and never been started since the last owner bought the car. He have in project to restore the car but sadly he past away.

 

me and my wife Alexandra are both 29 years old and are  brass area enthousiast but we own 3 Buick McLaughlin because the company are Canadian and have a wonderful history. We live in batiscan, quebec (French parts of Quebec, sorry if my writing are not perfect I do my best)

 

Our plan with antique is to have a collection of all running, original and unrestored or good old restoration car because they are in majority incontestably real when they are like that, not assembled from scratch. 
 

I’ll post more picture of all around the car And interior Monday morning.

 

if somebody know good knowleadgeable guys about McLaughlin I’m interested to have is information.

 

many thanks anthony 

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Congratulations, I have 1912 McLaughlin - Buick model 35. I saw it at Hershey in 1972 when I was 14. I purchased it about 15 years ago from a guy  in Michigan. I hope to return it to Hershey this year. It is a fun car for touring. Good luck with yours!

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hello everybody 
 

I need 5 34x4 1/2 tire for my McLaughlin 1920 project.

 

someone have this for sale please ? 
 

i know it’s available new but that cost me the price of the car with custom and shipping so if I’m able to find that use it could be perfect 

 

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On 1/10/2020 at 10:35 AM, cxgvd said:

We forum members rarely meet the purchaser, please let me ask you how you envision the cars future with you.  I know you just got it but do you plan to give the car a full restoration for Pebble Beach, get it going and use the Buick as found, park the car in your garage, tinker and admire it, or something else?

 

I think you are in Quebec, what is the state of the early car hobby there?  I love traveling in Quebec, we did a 2 week tour of the Gaspe peninsula recently, beautiful.

 

Congratulations, and BTW is it a 5 or 7 passenger McLaughlin.  Gary

 

HI gary its a 7 passenger. i want to leave it as it is and drive it after big verification. Sadly in Quebec not a lot of early car hobbiest. 

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12 hours ago, Anthony theriault said:

Sadly in Quebec not a lot of early car hobbiest. 

What is happening across Canada is these cars are being shipped out of the country like all cars to newer ones ( over 6 moths old for warranty ) because of the low $ value.  A friend just sold his 1929 Packard that went to the US is an example. Do a search for brass model T for sale or for that matter any car made before 1916 and see how many you will find. Not too many is my guess. This is killing the hobby in Canada as there are fewer and fewer cars to go around. 

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7 hours ago, Joe in Canada said:

What is happening across Canada is these cars are being shipped out of the country like all cars to newer ones ( over 6 moths old for warranty ) because of the low $ value.  A friend just sold his 1929 Packard that went to the US is an example. Do a search for brass model T for sale or for that matter any car made before 1916 and see how many you will find. Not too many is my guess. This is killing the hobby in Canada as there are fewer and fewer cars to go around. 

I try to found a 1910/1911 touring model t since 2 years in Canada and nothing has been offered to me. 

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On 1/16/2020 at 6:51 AM, Joe in Canada said:

What is happening across Canada is these cars are being shipped out of the country like all cars to newer ones ( over 6 moths old for warranty ) because of the low $ value.  A friend just sold his 1929 Packard that went to the US is an example. Do a search for brass model T for sale or for that matter any car made before 1916 and see how many you will find. Not too many is my guess. This is killing the hobby in Canada as there are fewer and fewer cars to go around. 

 

The low $ has a multiplying effect. It not only makes Canadian cars attractive for export, but it also makes our domestic cost of living rise in relation to incomes. A great percentage of out day to day consumer items are imported and the low $ means the retail  prices rises. Canadians spend more of their income just covering the basics, and there is an ever shrinking percentage of earnings left over for frills like hobby cars. This is especially true for younger would be car hobbyists . The loss of purchasing power combined with the run away housing costs many  ; but particularly younger, Canadians face is crushing the car hobby for many Canadians.

 

Greg in Canada

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)

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On 1/16/2020 at 5:18 PM, Anthony theriault said:

I try to found a 1910/1911

Mike a friend just  bought a 10 T roadster in Lindsay last month that needs restoring . Was in longtime ownership with the owner in failing health when the wife called Mike if he was still interested in the car. 95% of the time they trade hands among people that know each other there are so few around. Found my 12 T touring on Vancouver Island through this forum.  

 

Here is a search on KIJIJI for an car  1910 to 1927 and guess what not one for sale in Ontario  https://www.kijiji.ca/b-classic-cars/ontario/1910-1911-1912-1913-1914-1915-1916-1917-1918-1919-1920-1921-1922-1923-1924-1925-1926-1927/k0c122l9004 KIJIJI is more popular than CL in Ontario.  

Edited by Joe in Canada (see edit history)
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Absolutely ! Cars like very early Model T's exist in Canada in relative handful numbers. And you are absolutely correct, most cars in this category are in very long term ownership and when they change hands it is very often quietly between people with a long mutual association .  A couple of years looking is an eye blink in several areas of the hobby.  I personally shadowed a couple of my project cars for 10 years or more before finally being offered the opportunity to purchase.

 The thing that frustrates me even more than a long purchase courtship is that a good number of the more desirable cars / projects are not advertised locally or within Canada. Unless a person keeps a constant watch on some of the specialist, International venue's you don't become aware of cars for sale that might be almost in your back yard. More than once my buying competition has been in another country which complicates things quite a bit. And in at least one case the seller had cold feet about an international sale once he grasped how complicated things would be from his situation. Ended up selling the car to me at the same price the European had offered, simple cash transaction, I picked up the car and that was that.  No worries about export documentation, international payment complications, shipping complications.  But originally he thought  the car needed to be sold overseas to get the best price.

 

 

 

Greg in Canada

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)

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2 minutes ago, 1912Staver said:

More than once my buying competition has been in another country which complicates things quite a bit.

I tried buying a restored 1910 Reo 4 cyl on the US west coast and lost out to transportation issues. That is when I decided the next time buy and then worry about transportation which I have done.  

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Transportation is often a huge problem for me personally. I like out of the ordinary cars , either early North American or 1950's/ 60's British. And my finances dictate that many potential purchases are projects. Often basket case piles of parts that are for all practical purposes not transportable by a regular car shipper. So the only solution becomes a long, expensive drive with a truck or truck and trailer.  By the time the cost in time and expenses is factored in the overall price becomes impractical. Many missed opportunity's . And as you pointed out a steadily thinning out stock of cars in Canada. It gets even worse if you look at Western Canada. I am not really looking any more, lots to keep me busy already. But it sure has been a frustration over the decades. There is still a parts car in Toronto I would really like to acquire but how do you justify a $2000.00 trip to pick up a $1500.00 parts car? The sheer overall size of North America is a real PITA at times. Especially for those of us on a tight budget.

 

Greg

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The total cost to pickup the 12 T on Vancouver Island including the $1,400 ferry ride for the transport was $4,500. I may have saved around $1,000 by going myself so it was not economical to make the round trip with my truck and trailer.    

Edited by Joe in Canada (see edit history)

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On 1/16/2020 at 9:51 AM, Joe in Canada said:

What is happening across Canada is these cars are being shipped out of the country like all cars to newer ones ( over 6 moths old for warranty ) because of the low $ value.  A friend just sold his 1929 Packard that went to the US is an example. Do a search for brass model T for sale or for that matter any car made before 1916 and see how many you will find. Not too many is my guess. This is killing the hobby in Canada as there are fewer and fewer cars to go around. 

One of the biggest factors in cars leaving Canada is the rest of the world is willing to pay more for them! I have sold a few to Europe thanks to the internet after having advertised in Ontario Canada for long periods of time. There just isn't many people here who see the value as there is in Europe and USA. With our Canadian dollar being low makes our cars more affordable  against the USA dollar.

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29 minutes ago, Ed Luddy said:

One of the biggest factors in cars leaving Canada is the rest of the world is willing to pay more for them! I have sold a few to Europe thanks to the internet after having advertised in Ontario Canada for long periods of time. There just isn't many people here who see the value as there is in Europe and USA. With our Canadian dollar being low makes our cars more affordable  against the USA dollar.

 

As I pointed out above it's not just the advantage our low $ gives international buyers, it's the overall disposable income penalty  many Canadians  are facing due to the dollar / general economy  situation. It's hard to justify money on a hobby purchase when your household is slowly loosing their standard of living due to stagnant wages, steadily increasing expenses.

  Before my retirement I had what many in Canada would consider a reasonably decent job. By the later 1990's I was actually doing quite well, bumping into the upper middle class. Then my wages virtually remained unchanged for the next two decades. Over that time as you are no doubt aware household costs for nearly everything skyrocketed. About the only thing cheap these days are consumer electronics and really how much does a family spend on that compared to things like food, shelter. insurance, taxes and transportation?

  So I conclude it is not so much for lack of interest, or not seeing the value in Canadian market hobby cars that Canadians are not buying. But rather that many, despite a wealth of interest just haven't got the disposable income they once had , and therefore have trimmed hobby spending to the bone.

 

Greg in Canada

 

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)
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21 hours ago, 1912Staver said:

  I personally shadowed a couple of my project cars for 10 years or more before finally being offered the opportunity to purchase.

 The thing that frustrates me even more than a long purchase courtship is that a good number of the more desirable cars / projects are not advertised locally or within Canada. 

 

 

 

Greg in Canada

 

Sometimes you need incredible patience.Sometimes you just get lucky.

 

I knew of a pair of curved dash Olds engines that had been sitting in an old barn for many years. I finally bought them for scrap price 55 years after first seeing them.

 

My wife and I were at a local cruise night when a chance conversation led to us purchasing our '25 Buick coupe from an estate. It was going to be auctioned in the US after sitting in a basement garage for over 35 years. My offer was accepted,as is ,where is, without their aggravation of trying to get it running,etc.

 

Once they leave Canada,it's definitely an expensive proposition getting them back.

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Agree completely, and once they leave they almost never come back. Local to me on the West Coast countless Jag"s, MG's  Triumph's, Austin Healey's, British motorcycles and similar vehicles have been sold to Australia and Europe / UK.  They have gone from being reasonably plentiful in say 1990 to quite uncommon today. Once the cars are gone or are so rare that prices shoot way up, the hobby overall suffers. Clubs wither and die, General awareness fades. And many people who might have caught the old car bug move on to something else. A few; short term, make some money and the overall hobby suffers.

 

 

 

Greg

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)
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I did bring back a nice 15 T that is my avatar from Detroit 3 years ago. It was a good price or I would not have bought it. The savings in the price help make up the 25% $ exchange. But I agree once they leave rarely they come back. 

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