bruffsup

Beautiful tow truck /fire emergency conversions

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On ‎1‎/‎10‎/‎2020 at 10:12 AM, auburnseeker said:

I actually don't think the wrecker came from Hawkeye, there was a whole story on that and I don't think it had to do with Hawkeye.  He did have a really neat 28? Packard roadster Pickup Conversion he used to drive around that I would have loved to have gotten.  I grew up spending my Summers in Saranac Lake.  My Grandfather that was building Guideboats at the time knew Hawkeye for many years was going to take me up to see him and his cars , as my grandfather knew I was a car nut and he knew Hawkeye had quite a collection he had seen a few times.  A friend of my Grandfathers who also retired from Boat building went to work as a care taker and was going to show me a bunch of old Cars in a barn at the estate he was caretaking,  but that never came about either.  Too many missed opportunities. 

You are correct -that red wrecker is from another gentleman's estate a little further south and definitely not from Hawkeye's. He had a couple of really cool old service cars including a 12 cylinder Cadillac. The only thing he had with a boom was a monster mounted on a gigantic long Buick chassis that he used to pull the engines out of the various old wooden boats he was playing with. Incidentally, just for good record the boats that he owned over the years were just incredible and certainly far more exceptional and rare than any car that he ever owned with the exception of the Minerva. Anyhow, this picture was on the The Old Motor a while back and is one that I think would be awesome to try an emulate

PACKARD.jpg

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Matt, does this check any of your boxes? Hydraulic brakes, blackwalls, decent eight... 

Image result for 1926 duesenberg service car

1924 "A" Duesenberg service car used by the California distributor. Maybe you read the story "Full Classics Earning Their Keep" by Jim Donnelly this photo was in [December Hemmings Classic Car, 2013]. You might ruffle a few feathers showing up at an A-C-D meet with it, but you have to admit it has a certain panache. I wonder if anyone who tracks early Duesenbergs knows what happened to it.

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)
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I was told by the owner of a late 1920's Lincoln service car that Ford sent the dealers specific instruction on how they wanted them to cut down old limos/ 7passengers and fabricate the new service bodies. I guess they wanted to promote an appearance of conformity among the dealers. It would be pretty interesting to get a look at this literature-anyone ever seen/heard of this?

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Maybe you prefer an older dealer work/delivery vehicle ?   This Locomobile belonged to Walt G. for a time. Yours truly at the wheel, back in the early 1980's, shortly after Walt bought it from Austin Clark's L.I. museum. He can tell you more about it.

 

Paul

DSCN7811.JPG

Edited by PFitz (see edit history)
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The National Motor Museum in Birdwood South Australia has a Packard "wrecker" in attendance.

 

Packard Tow Truck2.JPG

Packard Tow Truck.JPG

Edited by Ozstatman (see edit history)
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From Chuck Fanucci:

 

This is my grandfather's tow truck circa 1917 Series 4 Pierce-Arrow.  This photo was taken in front of the AAA office in San Francisco, CA.  His shop was in Mountain View, CA for many years.  My father also used it in his garage/tow business in Santa Cruz, CA until it was replaced in 1944.  I remember riding in it when I was very young.  At the time, as it was right hand drive, I was allowed to sit in the front seat with my elbow on the window sill and pretend to be driving it!  It was such a thrill!!

 

Sorry the picture upload upside down...not sure how that happened.

Pierce Arrow.jpg

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On 1/10/2020 at 3:09 PM, Graham Man said:

1929 Packard at the International towing Museum in TN

https://internationaltowingmuseum.org/

No doubt neat!  But would a working tow truck of that era have all that chrome and white walls?

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This should help, Mr Fanucci selected a good rugged chassis to build his tow truck.

'17 Pierce-Arrow Series 4 tow truck - Fanucci.jpg

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Light vehicles underwent many modifications over the years too. 

When I was a teen,I spotted an old truck in a local village garage. A tall elderly gent and his wife were sitting on the porch. When I asked him if that was an old truck in the garage, he said "Naw,it's only a 1919 Ford "!  It was a turtle deck roadster with a box fitted. He drove it all over the area repairing farm machinery. It has been restored and preserved.

It inspired me years later to leave my '21 Chevy 490 as a  "field modified" pickup. When a local two cylinder John Deere club held a meet nearby, I had the correct-for-year Deere logo added to the doors. I also have a "Waterloo Boy" decal to go on the running board tool box in the spring. Deere dealers sold these until 1924,when the first John Deere tractors were offered.

1921 Chevrolet Roadster Pickup 002.JPG

Waterloo Boy sign.jpg

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here's a recent picture of my 1928 Lincoln tow truck that was converted back in the day taking off the back portion of the limo body and retaining the front of the body. Its a great runner.

RRCart018.JPG

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 "

  On 1/9/2020 at 7:03 PM, Matt Harwood said:

I have decided that I need to own a Full Classic tow truck. Very much want something like these. Maybe I'll cut the back off my '29 sedan...  "

 

 Not a Classic, but I always wanted a tow truck so I made my own.

 At least the wrecker boom is at least 80 years old.

 

 

IMG_0156.JPG

41 Ford at Moose Car Show.jpg

Edited by Roger Walling (see edit history)
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19 hours ago, durospeed said:

here's a recent picture of my 1928 Lincoln tow truck that was converted back in the day taking off the back portion of the limo body and retaining the front of the body. Its a great runner.

RRCart018.JPG

 

Wow, I love it! That must be a real show-stopper. I like that most of the conversions have pretty good proportions--the guys doing the work left enough of the front seat/cab intact to give it a proper look. I especially like this one with the Brewster windshield and padded roof, too--that way you know it was a custom body (Judkins?). Fantastic!

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The picture of the Locomobile type I express truck that I bought from Austin Clark decades ago was a 1907 chassis. the body was built by the Derham Body Company for the Ardmore Garage of Ardmore, Pa.

I found anf restored the proper brass lights for it ( sidelights it has in the picture are correct) and had a new radiator shell made to replace the dented original. I remade the correct front fenders and a new dashboard then sold the machine as I had a health hic up at the time. this is all over 35 years ago.

It is no longer a truck and was restored back to a town car. with a body of the era. It was at Hershey for sale some years ago and I do not know its current location or owner.

The fellow standing next to the Locomobile with Paul behind the wheel is Bob Patchke - Bob was a master body and paint man who taught me how to paint lacquer in the early 1970s - he and I restored the 1941 Packard 120 station wagon and 1931 Franklin Derham bodied victoria I owned cosmetically . I spent 2 + years working on those two cars to get them done - every Saturday, every vacation day , and some evenings - Bob lived 25 miles away from me. We got the two cars finished . I was teaching full time while all of this was happening , 1,100 kids a week, 6 or 7 classes a day. once I get my mind set to accomplish something I don't stop until its done.

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I know where there is a "restored" 1931 Cadillac tow/service truck that is for sale privately.  No pics at this time but if anyone is interested I could ask the owner for pics and more info. As I remember it had a professional looking body with the chrome rails.

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4 hours ago, Restorer32 said:

I know where there is a "restored" 1931 Cadillac tow/service truck that is for sale privately.  No pics at this time but if anyone is interested I could ask the owner for pics and more info. As I remember it had a professional looking body with the chrome rails.

With all this talk one of us might be interested so why don't you find out a little more if possible. 

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5 hours ago, Restorer32 said:

I know where there is a "restored" 1931 Cadillac tow/service truck that is for sale privately.  No pics at this time but if anyone is interested I could ask the owner for pics and more info. As I remember it had a professional looking body with the chrome rails.

If you go to the first post on this topic it was started by me !  I am interested!  Actually I remember buying one Ardun head from a collector /dealer in the boonies half way between Syracuse and Albany and he had in his garage a similar sounding Caddy ! It was not for sale.  This was 30 years ago in the dead of a very cold winter day and for the life of me I can not remember where the guy was. He did sell me a big box of Lotus literature which I still have !

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The following two trucks  were owned by the dealership I eventually owned.  Sadly, they were long gone.  The 34 olds pick up was built by the guys in our body shop as a parts hauler.  The other truck I believe is a 28 Chevrolet

28 Chevrolet.jpg

34 olds.jpg

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